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18

Personally I'm a supporter of sites with a mix of the two. Fonts should keep the same size both in landscape and portrait. It should merely be distributed differently depending on the current screen width. As you've also showed in the mockup for A. I feel that also scaling the text is like surrendering to a notion that "-ok, we know the text is very ...


16

This is delicate, and should be a sound judgment by the designer. There is no right or wrong, neither is there a convention (yet) to rely on. But there are a few things to consider, like zooming in just widening the page, which I feel is useless. If I want to zoom I can snap-in on the text getting it in a more readable form (both in Landscape and Portrait ...


12

This blog post tries to answer the question by looking at the orientation of the screenshots of different apps in the app store. It looks like your are designing a windows 8 app (your are referring to a metro app which could also be a windows phone app) it is too early to tell whether the stats for this platform will be different. About 64% of apps are ...


11

There are different approaches to device oriented design, and you can implement one of several design patterns to choose from. The first one that comes to mind is the fluid design, which (simply put) just reorganize the elements to a better view. Some, less important elements, are hidden as the screen width gets narrower and vice versa. Next is the ...


9

Let me add a late answer: after the content has loaded, do not let rotations trigger breakpoints. If the user rotates the device accidentally, their most immediate task is to reorient themselves and re-find the content they were viewing or reading at the time of rotation. But a breakpoint trigger, the user is suddenly presented with an interface they don't ...


3

Since you mention you're designing for Metro/Windows 8, the best resource I can link you to is Optimizing for both landscape and portrait from the Building Windows 8 MSDN blog. The most significant quote for your question is this one: We initially thought that landscape or portrait orientation was mostly influenced by personal preference. Each person ...


3

The question "on what orientation do people prefer to hold their tablets at?" is very similar to the question: "Do people prefer landscape oriented photographs or portrait oriented photographs"? There is no correct answer to this question since it depends entirely on the actual picture. In case of tablets: it depend on the application. In contrast to a TV or ...


2

Design for the content to fit within nicely within a range of widths, but don't assume any specific viewport widths. The content should determine the breakpoints for rearrangement and adjustment, not the currently popular device sizes (which is constantly changing). For some content/applications, the layout structure will change (and elements added/removed ...


2

For starters, I am a little puzzled as to why you say that some Mobile OS's dont offer the option to prevent rotation. To my knowledge Android has the option among the basic default settings to prevent rotation as shown below : With regards why there is a need for supporting both the portrait and landscape view in mobiles, I recommend reading this ...


1

I have extensively used all three options: 1) rotation impossible unless you perform some complicated menu selections, such as with an Android device in the locked mode or a Sony reader, 2) rotation on user's cue (Palm T|X had a symbol in its OS bar which rotated the screen on tap, always visible) and 3) accelerometer-based automatic rotation. From personal ...


1

Most of the problems with unintended rotation are caused by applications with bad rotation processing or by OS with not-precise sensors or too slow rotation rendering. Generally, if you rotate your device accidentally, you just rotate it back with no consequences. Maybe OS should predict user intentions smarter. I think, rotation lock is a kind of ...


1

Just a quick thought - there is a number of situations, that might make the locking necessary: When the application uses some accelerometer mechanisms and pivoting it may result in interface to switch to another orientation (upside down or landscape<>portrait) When your application gives access to a lot of content, you may consider it as well. One can ...


1

I'd consider the root of the issue. If the larger text is easier to read, then make the text in both views the same larger and easier to read size. Screen size, pixel density, and distance from the user's eyes is not changing when you rotate, just the orientation. Therefore, layout might change but not something as granular as font size. There are other ...


1

For consistencies sake, I'd ensure that the page on a device that started in portrait and is rotated to landscape is the same as if I'd started on landscape in the first place. If a user visits your site on two different occasions and it's different because of what orientation the user started out with, she's going to be confused. At which point I'd argue ...


1

I'll just add my 2 cents, I had created 5 iBooks in Portrait mode and just acquired the iBooks author manual for tips and tricks (The Ultimate Getting Published Guide) They say that they're experience was not good when creating in Portrait Mode as certain text box did not appear in Portrait Mode. They also say that Landscape viewing is what most people ...



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