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2

You could look into other kinds of components, like accordions and carousels to show more content without resorting to modals. Accordions work well for expanding list entries to show more detail. You might also consider a toggle switch to change between a detail view and a summary view. As John S mentions, be cautious of using modals. They are best reserved ...


3

Are these actual windows? Can you arrange them, stack them as you please and size them as you please? Dock them? You're not actually building windows if you're only building a big modal that covers up your entire screen and forces the user to hit "x". At that point the question is - "Is putting a giant modal that covers up all navigation and context a good ...


0

My guess: folders are legacy for desktop applications. The reason is: humans can handle only one level of hierarchy in an instinctive way. This was shown over-and-over again on various cognitive tests. Monocline grouping, as termed by Alan Cooper in About Face, while referring Donald Norman, seems to be the natural way of organizing things. Abilities of ...


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I interpret your question to be the following - if that's wrong, forget this post :-( Why are all settings put into one single dialog, with a left side navigation, instead of providing a menu structure which allows to open (amodal) windows for different kinds of settings (e.g., viewing preferences vs. file locations, "diverse functional groups" in @tohster ...


3

There are many reasons why UX designers make this choice A few observations: Settings are usually "out of flow" from the main app. For example, a music app's main flow is selecting and playing music. Settings like file locations, album artwork settings, and themes are not in the main workflow of the app. Settings are visited less frequently, which means ...


2

I believe it is wrong to give a warning that the caps lock is on because after all if a user already typed in his email/username before entering his password he probably knew its on. Additionally some people have passwords with many capital letters in them so they use the caps lock instead of the shift key. Its not your responsibility to tell a user to ...


1

This is quite interesting question to be answered. It is the very first heuristic by Nielsen Norman which states "visibility of system status- the system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time". I want to focus on responsibilities of UX practitioners, we should always see things from ...


2

Showing on the screen that Caps Lock is ON is a good practice. This is because you never know which actions user will perform while handling your system/website. Consider a novice user by mistakenly pressed caps lock and as it is not shown on the screen he is trying to enter the data/password. At the time of submitting he will surely be frustrated and ...


27

Indicating the caps lock is on is a design pattern used for passwords. When the passwords are hidden and every character is only represented by a dot, users might not know they're typing capitals where they shouldn't. It's easy to overlook the fact your caps lock is on. For example, I'm used to typing with ten fingers. While typing my elbows are set quite ...


3

I think the feature is very useful for password fields where you cannot see what you are typing and it gives you comfort to know you are typing the intended characters. Of course, most keyboards have a led that is on when you have the caps lock active, but it's nice to be reminded in the context of the form. This is a good practice because most password ...


0

One solution is to initiate the query when the user's mouse enters the row. Then cache the data in case the user uses the context menu. This means a fair amount of unnecessary network load, but that might be preferable in your case. You could also throttle it back so the query gets sent X milliseconds after mouseenter, but only if the mouse is still within ...



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