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Based on the answers of the question that you have linked, the answer actually is it depends. I have seen both the techniques use effectively. First example would be Medium. Here a single column works beautifully as the whitespace helps to retain focus and gives ample breathing room even for long reads. This is modern web's take on reading articles. ...


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It is important to understand how people read when they are online. After many research, using heat maps, it has been found that people do not read but scan. Research have shown that around 66 characters a line makes a faster and comfortable reading. Today users have many choices, they are in hurry and they will switch immediately if they don't get what ...


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I used to work in print and it was generally known that the optimum line length was about 11 words - the reasoning is that, as you extend the length of the line, it becomes more difficult for the reader to return to the beginning of the next line - This naturally affects the speed that the reader can navigate they way through the text and affects ...


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For those who wants to know what was the final result of my work, I'm posting an image here: I put two buttons in the system menu to access this form: one for the incomes (in Portuguese, "Entradas") and other for the outcomes ("Saídas"). As well, I put an icon and a big text in the top representing this to make the user aware of the transaction being ...


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The use of multiple columns for text comes from newspaper layouts and the time constraints involved in the days of physical type which was arranged by hand, where using multiple columns to a page allowed space to be changed easier should a new story break or an advert need to be placed/removed. So it could be another hang up from an older medium that ...


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Having a context menu is nice for a shortcut, but in this instance may be causing more frustration than help. Can you change the location of where the action is performed to something like 1) select the object and 2) find the action on an action bar. Something like this: This buys you some time because the user has to move their attention and cursor from ...


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Not showing anything before the check was done - violates the immediate feedback heuristic. Show the menu immediately but change it in anyway (enable or show some actions) once you know what's possible could disorient users - the interface changes but how the user suppose to know what's happening and when the shown options are really the ones? Although ...


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Here is the closest thing I could find to Windows desktop app UI guidelines for touch interfaces: https://msdn.microsoft.com/library/windows/desktop/dn742468.aspx From the top of the document: Fortunately, if your app is already well designed, providing a great touch experience is easy to do. For this purpose, a well-designed program: Ensures ...


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In addition to stats, a list of recently worked on items or previous searches can fill the void and provide a useful set of links to assist users in (re)finding items.


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I think not just for the first time. For every time you can have a wallpaper or big bold text giving a hint of the application. 1. With wallpaper Example. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups But the Google search page is the best example. 2. Without Wallpaper In case you don't want Wallpaper: Try this with a ...


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Add a start form, a place search box, and a list of previous searches made by the current user (under the search box). I think that many people do the same searches every day. A summary statistics page would be a nice solution. It’s very interesting to know some numbers and performance stats.


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They were replacing buttons with hyperlinks for no other reason that to be "with it". Did the UX team actually say that was the reason for replacing buttons with hyperlinked text? I can think of other reasons why they'd do this. Maybe there are too many buttons of equal emphasis on the screen and they wanted to create hierarchy by leaving the most ...


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I'd say keep things within the mental model of the users: hyperlinks redirect users to screens/ pages (I'm leaving this page; I can open this in a new tab, etc); buttons perform some kind of action that may or may not also include change in navigation. Hyperlinks (which are a different color to capture users' attention) could be used as references to take ...


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Probably not Hyperlinks and buttons have very different UX suitability: Hyperlinks Hyperlinks are suitable for space constrained situations (e.g. inline text, toolbars, or menus) or situations where buttons would be too intrusive (see this for example). Hyperlinks are also popular in consumer (non-expert) applications where a designer wants to highlight ...


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UX teams should not be doing anything because it is "with it." They ought to be determining how people are using the application; what they're trying to do while using it and coming up with ways to make the user's interaction with the software be as effortless as possible. Sometimes things are disruptive such as going from a DOS based system (yes they still ...



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