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7

In most cases, forms are made of native elements and the look and feel is therefor (ideally) determined by the operating system. Mac OS has a different way of showing something is disabled if you compare it to windows. Here are two text fields of Windows XP and Mac OS X with native behavior: vs. I would advice you not to change this behavior for several ...


13

Generalising between platforms I would go with the following basic guidelines, they further emphasise a disabled field with a grey background. Normal (with a value) Black text, white background, black border. Normal (with a placeholder) Grey text, white background, black border. Disabled Grey text, slightly lighter grey bg, grey border. E.g.


6

Some things I have seen done before in this scenario: Make placeholder text green instead of grey (user input is in black) Placeholder text is in italics (user input is in normal text) Put angle brackets around text, eg. < your name here >. (This one is somewhat "technical", i.e. something a programmer is more likely to understand) I would suggest ...


0

I'd take this approach: Put the actual, editable options in TAB 1 Put a clone of the options in TAB 2 but make it read-only, and add a label stating "You can change these options in TAB 1" (you also could put there a link to TAB 1!) You happen to realize those same options are relevant in TAB 3 too ? Put another read-only clone there too, no tweaking ...


0

If you end up putting the shared options on both tabs, you could: Style them differently (for example put them in a box with a black border or with a coloured background). Put them at the bottom of the tab, after a horizontal rule separator. This would make them stand out from the other options, and the colour especially may help remind the user that ...



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