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1

The more cruft you can cut, the more efficient you can be in conveying your message.


2

What a great question, Niklas. I'm a huge fan of minimalism so I took a chance to write an elaborate answer. First, I beg to differ: the art movement and the design style are not the same thing. “Minimalism” as an eponymous art movement has formed in 60s, after the WWII, taking it’s roots in various precessing art movements such as Constructivism, ...


2

Advantages - Minimalist Web Designs Have Faster Download Speeds Easy Maintenance People Do Not Like Pop-Ups Helps the Focus on Content Convert Better White Space Helps Your Website “Breathe” Easier Navigation Fewer Server Resources Less Maintenance Easier Responsive Web Design


0

I am developing a card-like interface right now, and it's tested internally to have 100% success vs. our current data-grid design. I embarked down this path when it came to light that our primary use case was not comparing data across cards, but performing actions on each. I endeavored to retain some measure of alignment, which I think goes a long way toward ...


1

The basic tenant you are selling is ROI - Return on Investment. UX is not fast and it is not cheap. So what's in it for me (says the CEO)? One organization that has done a good job of putting together material that explains the importance of UX is Human Factors International. They don't say anything that isn't said in plenty of other places, but they have a ...


0

You may not have to engage the CEO directly. I have experience where really good Visual Designers often think that they have UX "under control" - and it's just a subset of getting visuals right. They believe they have created something extremely usable. And they do care - they just don't believe they need a UX pro. So to influence staff with this ...


4

Your CEO probably knows already that Marketing is a pretty precise craft that operates with data like KPI's and metrics. What he doesn't seem to know is UX does wonders for just that. Best UX practices, applied to the website/app design, will guarantee that Conversion, Retention, pageviews, visits and all other important metrics will go up. And that the ...


1

This might help http://blog.intercom.io/why-cards-are-the-future-of-the-web/ Its from a year or so ago, but it does touch on a few key points regarding organization of cards. In a card organization pattern, the information is typically sorted based on the user, where they are coming from, and any other information the user has provided ahead of time to ...


6

When sorting anything either a Vertical or Horizontal list of items is preferred. (but not both) A vertical list is my personal preference as many devices are built to easily scroll up and down (i.e. mouse wheel, smartphones, etc.) among other reasons. Sorting Cards in a Grid First of all, this is a great question so go ahead and vote it up now. ...


1

Well, if you have a limited set of options, you could opt for something like Google's action button in the new Inbox app. The user would have to press one button (the icon representing 'doing something'). Pressing the icon will give you the options: having lunch in a meeting teaching preparing a lecture ...in the form of icons (optionally with ...


2

"All" option to the left of the "#" would be an easy fix. If you're thinking about adding more advanced functionallity in the future - namely multiple selection, consider doing it this way: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I really like this option for complex filters.


0

Not sure if this is quite what you're looking for, but for novel approaches - it may be worth looking at implementing simple elements of "gamification"? While still a bit of a buzzword, the idea itself revolves around a simple concept: increase engagement by rewarding basic, boring or otherwise undesirable tasks. https://usabilityhub.com award "karma" ...


1

This was discussed on Car Talks this past weekend. One of the brothers (forgot which) mentioned that German engineers have, for years, considered that placing it on the passenger side was superior for emergency situations when you have run out of gas and you need road-side fill-up. By placing it on the passenger side there is less chance of being hit by a ...


0

My 2 cents. It takes longer to walk around the car to fill up when the tank is on the passenger side of the car. (maybe 1 or 2 secs?) If you drive 150,000 miles at get 25 mpg you will buy 6000 gallons of gas. If you have a 12 gallon tank you will fill up at least 500 times. Over the ownership life of the vehicle this can mean you waste over 8 minutes just ...


1

You've got the right idea on keeping your contrast strong with plain white and black. Textures and shadows can distract a bit. I would try yellow text on black, or deep red on white. Yellow, Red and Green are typically the attention-grabbing colors used in "new! sale! free! shiny thing!" type elements...and as long as that same color isn't repeated around ...


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sparked by rajankz, I am thinking of perhaps doing alternate coloring on columns . .. yep that worked: http://www.textfixer.com/tutorials/css-table-color-columns.php


1

Have you tried using colors? if colors are not an options, then different shades of grey with different variations of weights should help. remember, just because one column is important that does not mean other columns do no needs any effects(like less important columns could be made thinner or with different shades grey to reduce importance) My suggestion, ...


0

I'm going to go the other way and say: Hide buttons that are unneccesary. Keep the visual bloat as minimum as possible. To me, a disabled button means that I need to select an option to enable it. An example of this is to check the "I read and accept the EULA" checkbox, which must often be checked before the Next button becomes available. Another example is ...


1

No, they should not be hidden, and not only because of consistency, although that is important, but also because if you hide them, you will hide what system can do from user. User should know Saving is generally available, even though it is disabled at the moment (therefore there are some conditions user must comply with to enable this functionality). ...


1

Based on the brief, initial details you've shared here, I recommend definitely not hiding those buttons, even if they're not immediately relevant to the user in whatever view from the wizard you're considering. Whenever we can provide users with contextual, visual queues that do not distract from the overall goal action, but actually enhance it, we should. ...


4

As a user I would prefer the Next button to change to Save on the last screen. Short of that, I would prefer disabled Save with a tooltip explaining why it's disabled. Although, it is possible to have < Back and Next > buttons on a separate row, so they don't move when a new button suddenly appears in the next dialog..


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The question I would ask him is What are the particular downsides to designing it the way I suggested The changing of back and next buttons is never really a good thing in a series of steps. The key word is consistency. Definr defines consistency as: Logical coherence and accordance. A harmonious uniformity or agreement among things or parts. You ...


0

If I was the user, I would prefer your solution. Consistency in this context means that the same buttons should be on the same place. Having "the primary" button highlighted is consistent as well - deciding the meaning of "the primary" is an important decision for the whole team though, I would say that "Next" is the primary button for a wizard, which would ...


2

My experience is with a range of complex applications needing a significant UX rework. The corporate UX strategy group concluded that our users give us a large degree of latitude for change providing that the quality of UX work is very high. To understand this better, consider the reasons for resistance: Changes in the way system operates Creates loss ...


3

Whether they have a right to do so is purely a political/corporate org/process question. Whether they should or not is entirely dependent on their abilities/expertise. In either case, the challenge is how do you handle it as the UX person? Some suggestions: always have business partner input formatted in the form of a user story if possible. The idea is ...


1

Well if you look at Product Owner's (PO's) role from the SCRUM perspective, it's the PO job to write stories that indicate what users wants to do and why, then prioritize the list of stories and provide additional requirements as needed. In terms of how the user's goal is accomplished, which includes the UI & technology, that's really not the PO's job. ...


2

I try to ask as much about what the user does instead of what the user might want. For instance, if I'm trying to improve a user's workflow, I'll ask: clarify what the user is trying to accomplish what is the current workflow? what is the hardest/most annoying/time-consuming part of the workflow? what are the users current hacks to get around the ...



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