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-1

Definitely avoid pairing red and green together on your website. It'll give low contrast between the two colors because color blind users will see them both as yellow. Why You Should Never Pair Green and Red Together on the Web


5

...to see if it is useful for our company to put some extra attention into our designs for those who are colourblind. It's not just colour-blind users who can't see certain colour combinations - actual blind people can't either, so you need to ensure data isn't represented purely visually. Webaim have some useful info on this topic that covers off the ...


1

If you choose to be a "web designer", who do you think will use the websites you design? Users? And wouldn't their interaction with your web site be their experience. So isn't being a "web designer" really, fundamentally being a User Experience designer? I'll go one further and say that in order to truly be effective in designing the user experience, you ...


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Lots of great answers here. I'd like to add- Many people who go into UX Design come from tons of different backgrounds. I've seen people switch into it from Psychology, Marketing, Copywriting, Development, and even engineering. Anyone who thinks they know how to empathize with the user. I myself came from a Graphic Design background. The role of UX ...


0

As a UX Designer, here's some observations from myself and some of my colleagues in the field. UI/visual design and UX/IA require very different skillsets you should try working on a project doing both to decide which you enjoy more I should probably define my terms so there's no confusion UI/visual design: This is your traditional "web design". Dealing ...


1

I think you'd want to be a web developer with UX skills. I think by default a web designer would have UX skills (although several don't :-P) because good web design is often and rightfully judged by usability. The design portion is where the UX starts, but don't discount UX in terms of development. Learning how to correctly serve content through code to ...


0

I don't think you you should look on the long run right now. You have to test every role to see which one fits you best and after a few years you can pick something to become an expert in. Try getting a role in an early start-up. You will have the pleasure to do everything from concept and planing to finishing products + maintaining and optimising. After ...


2

Straight out of college you are more likely to get a visual design job than a ux job. Better to go with what you are planning: web designer with ux skills. The upside: Having a web/visual focus will give you an impressive portfolio, which will speak louder than any concepting or write up. Keep learning ux - it will pay off in the field, and in time will ...


7

I did the exact thing you are looking to do. I worked for years as a web designer and started adding the UX skills as it went along, seeing that this field was really opening up. I now work for a company that builds pretty complex software for the commercial insurance industry and find myself involved in listening to the business development people talk ...


2

I think it sounds like you want to be a Web Designer with great UX skills. A web designer who is able to reinforce his designs with reasons behind the layout and implementation. Certainly something which would land you a rad job in an agency, and in an ideal world you would have big involvement with a dedicated UX team, certainly in concept stage, and would ...


8

Can you be a Web and UX Designer or a Web Designer with UX skills? Yes. (Seems like I should elaborate. In general, there is no one definition for 'UX' designer. Yes, some do only wireframes. Some do wireframes and JS. Some do JS and icon design. Some do branding and user testing. Some do research and interviews. There's a large range of skills that ...


-1

I highly recommend not using red and green background for buttons. Use blue as the primary action like in Bootstrap and gray as the secondary action button.


5

I wouldn't rely on colours for the various reasons already given in the answers here. I feel that what you are really looking for is more suited to the play / pause paradigm, so perhaps the most intuitive way to handle this is to imitate the icons used to play / pause music and videos. On youtube and other video sites, a pause icon is displayed on the ...


0

1) What's the best font size? You need to not just think about font size, but the font itself, since some fonts are more readable than others, especially at a distance. Some fonts are also easier on the eyes when printed (serif fonts) instead of when displayed on-screen (sans serif fonts), with other fonts having the opposite quality (more readable when ...


1

1) What's the best font size? As big as possible. The best way to test this would be to get details of the installation. Then print out screens, put them on the wall, and step back to the distance that most users would view it in person. 2) Is light text on a dark background easier to read from a short distance or is dark text on a light ...


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I would design the interaction such that each task includes an optional survey that is considered part of the task. That way, randomization will not break the link between task and survey, because they are considered one unit and will always travel together.


1

Well, I was struggling with this problem. I don't recommend to use log scale, first not all users will understand this scale, second one, if you have values that are close the difference between them won't be noticeable on the graph. I recommend two solutions: break graphs: but we need to remember to change the scale, scale must be adjusted not to the ...


0

You know a layout has good spacing when: Overall, the UI surface feels comfortable and doesn't feel cramped. The space appears uniform and balanced. Related elements are close together and unrelated elements are relatively far apart. There is no dead space between controls that are meant to be together, such as toolbar buttons. ...


2

You're focusing heavily on the word "accuracy", but you're discussing the topic of skills. In an educational setting, the word "proficiency" better represents the goals of teaching, and teachers often measure proficiency by reporting the students' accuracy on tests. I would try to use the more appropriate word, as it will help reduce confusion. Also, ...


1

Instead of "defining simplicity" in terms of other people's publications or studies, try focusing on your company's goals. You may find the definition is less important than the results. One of the first problems you're likely to run into is a rejection of external studies. Sadly, I've found that otherwise intelligent people will dismiss those studies ...


1

Why not order skills by accuracy? Order shows the pattern.


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From what I can tell, there isn't much context to the percentages that are presented. What are they percentages of? For example: "Skills to be improved - Subtract within 20: 30%". 30% what? If it's supposed to be Accuracy, it's not called out or made apparent anywhere. You could call it out or simplify the concept a bit.


2

Why not try visually showing their progress? Also, the color of the bars can change as the progress changes, RED= 10-35% Orange=36-70% Green=70%-100%.


1

Comments look quite prominent in this design. That is fine if you want to emphasize discussion around the answer, but if the answer itself is supposed to be the main point of the site, I would make the comments smaller and highlight them less--perhaps removing the gray highlight or nesting it inside the answer. If you want to de-emphasize the comments, I ...


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You can choose to set a primary and secondary call to action. Example from LinkedIn: This provides a single and obvious confirmation action the user can take without the disrupting concern for accessibility, cultural bias and decision confusion which can come from splitting the options by colour alone. Also, how it is written in the example above is ...


-1

In areas the read left to right, having the continuation or move forward button on the right, and the go back/abandon button on the left is popular. There are example for and against. Windows in particular is an offender as the Cancel button is on the right, or in whatever position the developer felt like. Red or green both have pros and cons discussed by ...


0

There is a clear distinction: Helvetica is a type family. Helvetica Bold is a typeface. 12pt Helvetica Bold is a font. I remember the definition this way: Family > Face > Font



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