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8

The world of screen sizes and resolutions are is a world of chaos. We could try to design for different devices ending up with many mockups, but it wouldn’t do any good. Instead, we try to design against a grid system only dependent of the width. The boundaries will change over time, but the general thought is to design for three different layouts: Desktop, ...


4

If you're designing 20 variations of the same interface, something has gone wrong. To be honest, I think it is a little bit of a myth that designers are increasingly having to redesign their layout because the size of screens has grown. The number of devices sure has grown, but layouts for different size screens has always been an issue. What my workflow ...


1

Most wireframing / prototyping tools aren't platform specific. They're a blank canvas and you can use them for any platform. There's a significant group of mobile-specific tools which you can't use for desktop sites and apps, but beyond that I don't think there's any difference. An overview of some of the tools can be found here.


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I don't think there is a specific framework for dealing with that. It's difficult enough to do it for one system, over which you have control. However, a normal full design process (it may be skipped in some kinds of agile) will have you define the scope, context and interface of your own system very early, before you start with tasks and scenarios. This ...


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I don't think such a methodology exists because of the following reason. Each device has its own set of restrictions in terms of size, accessibility, interaction etc. Every technology behemoth advices us to create a separate native app for that particular platform. As an example you could see any native Google app (like gmail) running differently on ...


4

I'm going to interpret your question as "UX: can anyone show me whether it works?" The best example would be the $300,000,000 button. In short, an ecommerce website was designed to ask users' to register before purchasing. By changing this to allow customers to purchase without registering, the company earned $300,000,000 more that year. And $15m of that ...


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How about combining them by singer? [a][b][c][d][e] Elvis - (13 songs) Ernie Wood - (2 songs) Browsing is helpful for users who are not familiar with artists. For those who are familiar and looking for specific songs/artists, search function would be best.


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There's no rule here. In general, though, if you're writing paragraphs, then you're likely not 'getting to the point' as fast as typically warranted via a bulleted list. As for when to use ordered vs. unordered, that's a bit easier: is there a particular order to the points? Then consider ordered.


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To answer the question you would need to look at two things in particular: Best practice for bullet points Optimal length of characters per line Best practice would suggest that the purpose of a bullet point is to summarize or create an easily scannable list of items. The more you increase the length of the content in that bullet point item, the more you ...


1

InVision does this beautifully as long as everyone sticks to it. In InVision you get to upload images of your design, create interactive prototypes and share them as web links with clients and colleagues. People can comment in line (that is, as with PDF's create comment bubbles projected on the design), and you as the owner can view the process in a timeline ...


1

I know this might sound very basic, but I just keep track of everything through Google Drive. I will sit down with a client and discuss what makes the most sense. During that process, I take a ton of notes and talk through the things with the client that they like and don't like. For example, if a client tells me they don't want Feature A because of X, Y, ...


4

I have not worked in the New Zealand market, so I can not speak specifically to that context, but I will include a few notes on the core principle that you are attempting to overcome -- Localization. Aspects of localization include technical aspects of the local market, making the product behave appropriately in the national market, and addressing specific ...


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You could user a "user" icon for a manually generated document, and a "computer" icon for the automatically generated ones.


2

Starting as a designer with a fresh psychology degree and little design skills whatsoever (but a huge passion for design) I stuck to minimalistic designs even when it was not fancy, way before it was cool. In my own time I learned how to play this card right so that my designs didn't seem boring and blank, but rather sophisticated and elegant. It is ...


2

Minimalistic. I say this because I have always hated interfaces with thousands of effects for no apparent reason, flashy colors/too many colors, and things like that. I hate it because it is just too much. While the developers could have been working on the software itself, they put way too much effort into it, making it look far too unprofessional. Take ...


1

If Google changed their homepage to fancy design from the current simple one, would it make you like it more, thus visit more? Answer is obviously a big "No". Similarly, UX of your website should be dictated by your target users' needs. So, I would say, design approach (whether minimalist or fancy) is not the main criterion on improving the UX of your ...


5

I recently wrote on article about this for UX matters entitled "Do more pretty and professional looking websites result in an increase in conversions?" Firstly, tread carefully. There are lots of examples of this unintended effect where conversions have decreased despite the visual impact of the change being qualitatively positive. Remember Digg.com? When ...


0

In terms of labels above vs. to the left, it really comes down to the length of the labels and field values. In terms of visual style, both are uses, but consider as well that there may be better solutions. We've found that actual boxed input fields test better than the iOS7 'invisible field' style. We also prefer them aesthetically.


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Both styles work but I'd offer a 3rd style: a subject header that says what the form is (ie. Sign Up) with the given text fields that have sub-text filler that you type over. That said, I agree in part with @skwokz though I wouldn't worry about the size so much. Option #1 provides clarity and space, and more clarity because of the font used (black text ...


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The vast majority of people enter a gas station from only one direction already; people have a very strong statistical tendency to enter a gas station by turning right (rather than crossing traffic turning left). This leads most people to be entering from the same direction. They can only access one side of the pumps without turning around on the station's ...


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I actually tend to do the opposite. The first one I use for simple form (but honestly hardly ever use this format) and the second I use for more complex or longer forms. The reason for this is that for the first style, you very quickly run into issues with field label length and you ended up with varying heights from different fields which very quickly ...


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I know of no (substantial) difference between "notice" and "information" messages. I would suspect these terms come from different sources (like different UX guidelines, or UI frameworks) and differ only because nobody cared to think about them both. Such messages relate information about the system state or activity to the user - progress, completion - ...


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You are dealing with communication vs information question. The two words 'information' and 'communication' are often used interchangeably, but they signify quite different things. Information is giving out; communication is getting through. Sydney J. Harris So messages that provide infromation (info messages) could esclate to warning if you ...



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