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I believe that the number of columns in this table is the real decider. Without an example table this is all conjecture, I would recommend adding an image so people understand what you are asking. However, that being said, lets' examine your table interaction. Examination: Based on your own words, "EDIT" is the main control. If we are dealing with simple ...


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Its a fairly broad question to be honest, I' start by looking around at both playforms UI patterns to identify the differences between the two before you start to research, sketch and prototype and test this will make it easier when you come to design and prototype it. Assuming you mean mobile (not tablet) the main thing is getting the screen size right in ...


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You could use Googles Material Design as inspiration here. While you describe the component you're designing as a table, it also sounds similar to a list pattern. When designing lists, material design guidelines recommend placing the primary action on the left and secondary actions on the right. https://material.google.com/components/lists.html#lists-...


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Typical number of rows is likely to be the decider. For example, if you have a few rows, Edit buttons might look ok, but if you have many rows each with a Edit button then this might over dominate the visual design, so hyperlinks on column one would lead to a cleaner, less dominant visual design. I personally prefer to use hyperlinks on the primary piece ...


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It depends whether you want the user's profile to be their face or not. On one hand, the client is right - it would be harder to fit a group photo into a circle, or many photos that aren't just faces. There's a reason camera's take rectangular pictures, after all. So if you want users to have profile pictures that aren't their face, than a square seems the ...


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It would depend on the 12 characteristics of your objects. Do they have a chorological sequence? You could use a timeline view. Do you have dependent data? May be the tree structure would suit. Or it could be cards or expandable lists etc. More importantly, what is the primary use-case for your users? What's their intent?


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A table is just fine, but there's an awful lot you can do with a table! Just because information is in a table doesn't stop you making it easy to scan, see connected information, identify groups, emphasize important items, and generally ensure that the data itself is in the foreground and the 'table decoration' itself fade into the background. The ...


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I think one of the toughest things to parse here is the typography. All that extra tracking plus all-caps is making this look like a jumble of individual characters, instead of recognizable words.


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Another **possible fix ** could be just swap the position of the form in the second case (where few addresses are already there). And make the entire address chunk/div clickable with different prominent states (hover, selected). Also you can change the visual style of showing it as possible options(in this case the position of the radio button). In the ...


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The design as you show it assumes people want to add multiple shipping addresses and then choose one for the current order. I think this is not the typical use case. Adding a new shipping address is needed only if it is not yet in the list of existing addresses: Either this is the first shipment, or the current order should go somewhere else. Having this ...


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You can ask the user to name the address by something at the end of the check out. So that for the next purchase, s/he can directly select the address from a drop down. In case of new address a specific and prominent button will be present with "Add New" label.


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These guys did a thorough research and came up with the Design Tools Survey You should find all your answers here : http://tools.subtraction.com/


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It is not that important if you already have a lot of design experience. If you don't have much experience then the HFI course will arm you with some useful skills and knowledge. Also, if you are looking for a new job, it might be that the HFI Certificate is the only thing that separates you from other candidates. As for other alternatives, there are now ...


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A fun way to do this is with one sided borders with colors that indicate where a user might be on the page. I have used this with a slight transition to the border width increasing on click/transition. heres some code for ya: .active{ background-color: @activeGray; border-left: 4px solid @ghOrange; transition-property: border-left; transition-...


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It's always a good idea to provide users with feedback and to indicate where they are/packages are in process. So the idea is right, the only issue I can see (maybe you didn't indicate it in your example) is that it will be hard to tell what has happened and what is happening. Basically what stage the package is in. I would suggest to use something like this:...


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"Tools", in the context of an image editing application, are typically local operations. That is, they are actions that the user does by clicking (or pressing) on the canvas (e.g. draw, select, erase, zoom). It's generally understood that you select a tool, and that the selected tool governs how the user interacts directly with the canvas. On the other ...


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If 'Advanced Settings', sits under 'Tools', then you could use the gear icon for Tools and the three dot icon for advanced settings (...) It's kind of like opening the toolbar, and then you can dig deeper into the toolset if you want. I think any kind of 'expand' type icon could work here. You don't really need to find an icon for advanced settings, just ...


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The terminology you are using is incorrect. Instead of terming Image Processing functions consisting of Hue, Saturation, Contrast, Brightness, etc as Advanced Settings, a better option is to name it Edit or Tune Image. Why? Because major photo editing apps do this. Instagram and Snapseed both use an Edit icon for tuning the image with image processing ...


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To me, the advantage of the balloon tooltip is that the small triangle points directly to the element that it relates to, which reduces ambiguity in a crowded user interface You can argue the user knows where his mouse/finger is pointing, but one scenario it's actually useful for is disseminating screenshots that don't show the mouse pointer or supply ...


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Solely based on my opinion, I think there are very few cases where adding the excerpts would be more valuable than just good titles alone. The only great examples of excerpts over titles that I've seen are usually reporting articles like the New York Times, or Scientific American or short story forums like THRESHOLDS. The content is what makes the excerpts ...


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Overlay the like count on the item If everything's got a count, even if it's zero, it's clear that the number relates to the specific item. You could also add a thin footer to each image and have metadata, e.g. likes, in there. An important point here is that UI design is about trying to subtract from the interface, not add to it, so you should have a ...


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Any brightly coloured background is a bad UI, for physical and physiological reasons which I expanded on in this answer Should software for 8 to 14 year olds be colourful and "childish"? As for how to draw attention to an error message against a pink background: you need to increase the contrast between the red background and the pink background. ...


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I don't think there would be a paper on this, but an obvious example to consider would be the client/customer and vendor situation. Some people argue that using the word customer reinforces a professional relationship and therefore reduces the appearance of 'friendliness', and hence sometimes the term client is used to put them at a higher status in a ...



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