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0

You can use the shopping cart design pattern, which most users are familiar with. You can do something like the following : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

I found this particularly insightful : http://www.colormatters.com/color-symbolism/global-color-survey. After taking the survey, the results were as follows. Over 130,000 people from all points on the globe took the survey. Here are the results: Happy - Yellow Pure - White Good Luck - Green Good-tasting - Red (tomato) Dignity - Dark Blue High Technology ...


1

When clients say they want to transmit something, I normally ask them for examples of what products, logos or slogans they have in mind at that time. My idea of luxurous may not be exactly the same of my client, so through examples and exploring more of their public I can have more of those informations. Maybe people from one country think golden colors ...


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I think a missing piece in the answers so far is constraint. Elegance is impossible without constraints. UX is all about designing a UI that accomplishes the desired functionality while meeting or beating all the constraints (effective use of screen real estate, minimizing mouse clicks, reducing the need for training or help files, etc.).


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It is subjective word... I think that people are using it when they want to say something is fine. What's fine? That's also a good question. Fine is highest of highest grade without exaggerating but keeping the real value of what is there... PS: I am writing this post while drinking a glass of fine wine or maybe not...


1

It all depends on your audience. Professional designers? Yeah, they'll make sure the graphic is awesome. Professional artists with management and social media teams? Of course they will. Your average user? Absolutely not. They will grab whatever photo they usually use or some random one from profilephotoplacewithglitter.com and be done. If you want ...


1

For me, elegant design has the following qualities: It accomplishes its purpose in the simplest way possible. It's easy to use and doesn't cause frustration. It's aesthetically pleasing. It elicits the desired emotions. It doesn't do anything unnecessary.


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I'm very interested in this question and there are some good answers. However, could someone cite a website which they feel demonstrates these qualities. For example, to use a few staples....is facebook elegant? Is twitter elegant? Both are packed with functionality but in my opinion FB seems to me to be bloated. FB 2004, although much more primitive was ...


13

To me, elegance is the combination of three features: Simplicity, coherence, and powerfulness. This can be applied to a design concept, aesthetic appearance, interaction design, and underlying code. Simplicity. Simplicity means few elements. It could be a concept that’s easy to explain in a few words, a visual design with few colors, lines, and shapes, an ...


1

It is definitely subjective to a certain extent and perhaps the best way to understand it's intent is to ask for an example whenever someone mentions an elegant design. However, I think one can by default assume that elegant has the same connotations online as it does offline; as clean, minimal, and beautiful as possible.


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Elegant should mean slick design, polished to be simple and beautiful in one time. But as every word, that is connected to people perception, it is too subjective and personal, so it can mean different things for different clients and customers. So you just need to ask more questions, to understand, what does the word "elegant" mean in each specific case =)


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Elegant design is the visual equivalent of concise writing/speaking, in my mind. The aim is to convey as much as you can using as little as possible. Complete. Simplicity.


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In my opinion, in an 'elegant' design both the looks and interactions are visually pleasing, as is the user experience. Also, for it to be elegant, it should be clean, organised, feel spacious and shouldn't use too many colors/fonts. It should just feel like it's complete.


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From my own experience, an "elegant" design is a design that not only looks visually pleasing, but also has a very good user experience. Personally, I don't think a design is elegant enough without the user in mind. If a site isn't usable, then how can it be considered successful?


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I do not understand what do you mean by goals. Is it the UX aspect of the application or features for an application? In my opinion, the Business have a say in what can be delivered when it comes to the features. This does not mean the users requests are ignored, but kept in backlog which will be pulled back at a later date to implement and deliver. This ...


1

I think you're making comparison with how timeline is being presented in real life. You could ask the same question why Facebook, Google+, or any other timeline based apps, present the latest event at the top and past events below. First and foremost, in designing how information is being presented to the user, we need to understand what the user is most ...


1

I've not used Google Glass but I'd imagine that since the cards feel like a band around the head, then swiping backwards should feel like you're physically swiping the cards into the past (as if to throw them behind you) in order to be able to see what's coming up. Conversely swiping forwards has to do the opposite. So it's probably a mistake to see it as ...


1

This question is more about project management and change management than UX. But it's a well known situation in UX-non-mature organisations. I've met it twice personally. It is a long path for you to build up awareness for users and to establish design processes that merge business as well as users needs. Look out for UX maturity docs - how to reach it ...


0

Generally business managers consider usability as a low priority issue. Managers know that employees do not have any other option but to use the available software. What managers do not know, is the indirect costs of low usability. A low usability software can reduce employee productivity, increase strain and anxiety, increase errors etc. Subsequently ...


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You need to respect the decision of the party that is footing the bill. If the business does not give user input proper priority that is a matter between the business and the user. If you bypass the business to give user input a higher priority you are going to lose. The business is not going to respect those actions and without business buy-in and ...


0

I really like the approach Slack has taken with "hot spots" showing up as you start using the app. While it's annoying after you've been through it a couple of times (joining a new team site triggers the walkthrough for each specific team), it's very effective with how it introduces the functionality.


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You have a particular set of skills, as does marketing. You're concerned about the twenty percent that gets it, and they're concerned about the other eighty percent. The two perspectives are complementary. I wouldn't assume that your users know their data types as well as a programmer or mathematician would. Why not use "number" with a single input, ...


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I think marketing have a point. I'd invest in doing some initial face to face user research to actually understand what your customers want and what they understand.


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What about labeling it "Whole Numbers"? Also I suggest an A/B-Test on this: One with "Integer", one with "Whole Numbers". Which performs better? Btw about question mark icons: I ran a usability test for my bachelor thesis. Findings: No one considered reading the question mark info, even though the answer to successfully ending a task was completely ...


1

You should say to the marketing team, that if the customers are attorneys they have the obligation of knowing what an integer and a decimal are, because a cause can be lost on a court, just from not having the right words proffered. In the Law and Rights area, the attention to the little linguistic details in the text is very important.


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If the majority of the advanced search users are familiar with the difference between "Integer" and "Decimal". (And will I recommend you perform a quick user test to confirm this assumption.) Then consider putting in a small thing to explain terminology for the minority. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It's ...


3

Put it to them this way: these days, the word "integer" gets taught at elementary level. Most people are going to know what it means. I do see their point for more technical terms though - if people aren't going to understand, you have a problem. A possible solution is to add a clickable question mark icon next to technical terms that produces a definition ...


0

I suggest using multiple activities. You could check the form after every activity and make elements bigger which makes your UX better. This way there could be +/- 5 inputs in one activity. Once done the user could click on a nice big next button. (Since they have never used android before this makes it easier.) The activity then checks the data and if ...


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I think the best example of eliciting user feedback in recent years is the facebook like button. It's so easy to like a photo or story you like that it seems to have become the defacto method to like something. Pandora has extended this with the thumbs up or down. Now if you are looking to extend it a little further you could have a drop down on the thumbs ...


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Check this out: http://inspired-ui.com/tagged/walkthroughs These are mostly showing first-time-use scenarios, but the same idea can be extended for new features.


0

The cord on headphones is usually on the left, so it makes sense for the mic to be on the left too so that the mic's cable doesn't have to cross all the way over to the right side, thus reducing the wiring/complexity. That's my guess anyway. Why the cord is on the left, I don't know.


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A good way to introduce new features to users in mobile app is to use instructional overlays or coach marks (a transparent overlay of UI hints). Take a look at this article to see some helpful guidelines on how to implement these UI hints: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/mobile-instructional-overlay/


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I personally try to avoid going in with a fixed number in mind. Instead I treat it as a continual process where we carry on interviewing while we're still learning new things (sometimes called the saturation approach). The point where we're start hearing the same stories repeatedly is the point where we move the focus from research to analysis and ...


0

My thinking is along your theory #1. As some people have commented, the microphone can also be on the right side, which indicates to me that this isn't an absolute design standard. It seems to be more convenience based then. So what is convenient about it? As stated in your first theory, it frees up space, allowing for uninterrupted interaction with the ...


0

While referring specifically to usability, the following article by Nielsen states that five are already enough to find out a lot of issues. This is close to the 8-12 rule mentioned by danimu: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/why-you-only-need-to-test-with-5-users/ I also remember reading about a "rule of thumb" for qualitative research that goes like this: ...


0

Swarm has a solid branding reason, as shown above, and there are surely a couple who use it for a futuristic feeling, but for most sites, it boils down to novelty. It may feel more exciting, like when sites started using circles rather than squares to contain faces. (To be fair, there's a iffy but real case for circles as more humane.) But there's nothing ...


2

Academic studies tend to say between 8-12 is optimal for qualitative research. However if you are targeting discrete groups of users (e.g. teachers and students) you may need 8-12 of each discrete type. In my experience, the cost starts exceeding the benefit after about the 8th participant. The following factors should also be taken into account: ...


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As for the UX aspect of this question, I'm going to have to say I very much doubt their effectiveness. If anything, perhaps it's because they cut off a slightly smaller part of the image within the same square dimensions: Having said that, I'm pretty sure Swarm's reason for using hexagons relates to their branding, which draws from nature's very own ...



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