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In order to show data is related in the same table there is a 3 step process. Put the data next to the related elements (you did) Show some classification of which data fields are related (you did) Tell the user why its related! Because it may not be obvious See my design. You could alternate colors between the related fields and maybe when they hover ...


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Your current approach is heading in the right direction. When your users use this data regularly, they will already know the relationship between the groups. Switching background color is one way of creating contrast between groups. Other ways would be to use line separators and white space. One thing you can have do to make it more obvious is by ...


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Use grouping horizontal lines and eliminate the verticals one. Horizontal lines helps to lead the eye along the line, while vertical lines become a barrier along the eye path:


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It looks fine to me, I believe the terminology "we host a version for you" isn't great, perhaps:


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Joel is not always right... The article conflates two different arguments in support of bloat. It makes the case that: Resource bloat can improve software because (a) it allows developers to ship faster; (b) it allows software to support more features, and (c) bloat is relative, meaning that if computing power grows faster than resource bloat, then in ...


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Bloat by size and efficiency is very different to a bloated feature set Feature Set In the argument around optimal set of software features, add adding "everything" in the Kano model provides a strong way to manage the coverage of features for a population. Enables one to strike a balance between "all the features for everyone" and "enough features to ...


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Its a nice question! I agree there is confusion among many people and drawing a line between all the branches is difficult. Reason being all the branches mentioned overlaps at one point or other. The answer actually lies in the names but due to their overlapping nature people do get confused. Even the companies while writing job descriptions. Understand, ...


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App design is new as a profession so I have borrowed wisdom from a much older profession for getting design perspective: method acting. User stories, psychographics, and personas are very common approaches to the initial/ideation phase of app design. I've found that they are helpful descriptive approaches, but I've found it more powerful to spend time ...


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I think the following activities can help to expand the perception of every UX professional: Usability testing (as much as you can) Constant research (new studies, trends, recognized blogs, etc) Participating in communities like this! Knowing your app use cases.


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You're right in not making decisions based upon your own assumption. What you could do is usability testing with actual people. The best test would be conducted with 5-7 (or more) testpersons from the actual targeted audience in an environment they will be using the app or at least in an environment where they are comfortable. If you don't have time to ...


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Use BrowserStack and test them all. It's the right thing to do. It's a VM environment that you can get for less than the cost of one phone.


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Generally, I would pick the previous (current minus 1) generation ...although the decision will of course depend on the specifics of the app. Reasons: Apple does a lot of testing on the current vs previous generation. So apps that run on the previous generation are likely to also run on the current generation. There is a VERY large tail of users on ...


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How long will development take? Do a SCRUM type approach--you and 3 others come up with the time you think creating the application will take. Average those numbers. Then consider the timeline of new iOS device releases. (IE: Does it happen every 3 years, every 2 years, etc?) What iOS device will be relative when it launches? It will be easier to find the ...


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Very easy: The latest and newest device your budget allows. Technology will always go up and won't downgrade, so the older version you get, the less it will last. Another option is an iPod Touch + an iPad so you can cover a wider range of screens for around the same cost of a phone. But of course, you won't be able to use anything related to phone, so take ...


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Apple must provide a visual clue if it cannot send a text message. Why not leverage that? Just googled (as I don't use an iPhone) and Apple uses an exclamation point. See: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204065


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Android offers you the opportunity to use a Toast, iOS doesn't have such a feature. Apple actually tells you to serve people an AlertView whenever you want to show an error occurred.


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You are the one who is running in your business circle. Think about all the times you've accepted a business card. What did you do with it? What did you like about it? Match those expectations. In the US we use business cards almost like personalized stationery sometimes. If someone hands you a card and says "call me on Tues" you write call Bob on Tues. on ...


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It really depends so much on you – what you want your business cards look like / feel like – it's your business card and ideally it should speak for you, represent you, your ideas, your style. Just two thoughts on those two 'recommendations' you quoted: You're working digital? Feel free to put a QR code on your card! Other people find QR codes on business ...


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1) Decide where the instructions come. If the first 5 fields are simple and don't need any help I would omit instructions on top. My inspiration was to be as contextual as I can. 1 2 3 4 5 Instructions 6 7 2) Visually, I like instructions identified on the right corner with either a prominent font, OR a color OR maybe a background. (Use only one or two ...


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With the surge in mobile/tablet access and the rapid advancements and usage of voice services I would say yes of course. It conveys a smoother user experience and you are always better designing with a forward thinking mind frame


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First off, take a breather my friend! I have recommendations for you. Firstly, identify the market. Who are they selling to? The demographic, the age, novice users or not, gender, etc. Figure out who they are. From that, build your personas (ex: "John doe is a middle aged man who rarely has time to check his desktop computer, and that's why he's always on ...


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I would say definitely sacrifice the images on mobile. Don't think of it as a sacrifice though, just an efficiency :-) You'll never cater for the full breadth of mobile devices with a large menu and images - keep it simple and get the users where they want to go. By the looks of things the links have very concise titles so the images are just for aesthetic ...


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this is for a student project so I am just looking for ideas on how data from all of the requirements gathering and evauations are collated, there does not seem to be a set format


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Some good answers above but some could be problematic. See the following: Things to avoid and best practice: Firstly, in your examples the first option is better - blue is well known as an actionable link (just look around this stackexchange page!) so having the page you're on as blue wouldn't be ideal. However, putting the current page link in Bold (or ...


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Your UI designer will make a colour scheme, which usually defines the colour of a clickable item. It might be contextual, and it would probably need a hover state colour as well. But as Tohster has said, relying on colour alone is an accessibility problem. There needs to be an additional cue, and you have to leave it up to your UI designer to make it for ...


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None of the above Colored fonts are used widely and varyingly in interfaces nowadays so it's not a good idea to rely only on color to differentiate clickable elements. This is especially true for navigation elements (versus, for example, inline links) Color-only approaches present accessibility problems for the color-blind. Alternatives There are ...



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