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42

Don't do that, there are different approaches to filling out values, and for some it would be disruptive. For example if the user just wants to change the last digit... A good, non-disruptive alternative would be a small "clear input" button.


39

I believe there's some sort of misconception here. How good a design is is not in correlation with how expensive or premium something seems. A design can't be "too good" for its users. In the package of design (the art of applying knowledge and best practices into a solution) knowing one's target group and speaking to that target group accordingly is also ...


35

You could have the input value selected when the user clicks on the input. This way the user can just press backspace or start typing to change the value or copy the value instantly.


35

While for the end-user, the "less-is-more" theory tends to be a huge win, you've got to get into the client's shoes to get where this opposition comes from. The short answer is: they want to 'get what they're paying for.' I usually find myself in the sometimes awkward space mediating between board members, designers and the rest of the development team ...


22

If the data is tabular, then I see no reason why one shouldn't go with tables? After all, the whole purpose of table element is for showing such type of data. But if your query is how to make the tabular data look more beautiful, then read this article - http://darkhorseanalytics.com/blog/clear-off-the-table/ In nutshell, it follows the principle of 'Less ...


21

Ryanair (Eurpean Airline based in Ireland) used to trade on their 'we are very cheap and we provide absolutely no frills at all' service And used to have a suitably cheap and nasty website to match ( all garish colours and animated gifs ) Since they changed strategy recently to not ""unnecessarily piss people off (see quote below from their CEO ) " ...


18

Most games succeed by taking a good game design and combining it with a compelling theme (Taking over the world, building a real estate empire, or solving a murder--to name a few obvious examples). Without knowing much about your game, I would say it would probably benefit from adding some kind of theme that will make it less abstract and inform the visual ...


14

Probably, the main reason why clients are afraid of empty space is because they feel it exists because there was nothing to put in it! You can explain the following reasons why empty space is important: Allows easier readability of the content Prioritizes information and can bring actions into focus Conveys a sense of elegance and sophistication and ...


14

To me, elegance is the combination of three features: Simplicity, coherence, and powerfulness. This can be applied to a design concept, aesthetic appearance, interaction design, and underlying code. Simplicity. Simplicity means few elements. It could be a concept that’s easy to explain in a few words, a visual design with few colors, lines, and shapes, an ...


10

I'm sure you already know yourself why whitespace is good on the design side for making things feel uncluttered, but this information doesn't tend to help non-designer-folks want to get on-board with the lack of stuff. Talking in terms of priorities and KPIs. I've experienced much the same, and what I've found is that when I talked about things in terms of ...


10

The key to good UX in game design is not only to make it easy to interpret and enjoy, but to make the physical design cohesive with the conceptual design of your game. It is difficult to completely understand the significance of the failure paths and consequences without fully understanding the game objectives. While the circle representation is simple and ...


9

I did the exact thing you are looking to do. I worked for years as a web designer and started adding the UX skills as it went along, seeing that this field was really opening up. I now work for a company that builds pretty complex software for the commercial insurance industry and find myself involved in listening to the business development people talk ...


9

It's better to be consistent with other games rather than doing it opposite for the sake on being different. As we read from left to right and go the opposite direction when deleting, undoing. I believe this is the reason why it is so. We have certain mental models like this set up and going against them creates a kind of friction in the user. Imagine ...


8

My interpretation is that people are getting used to the new world of computer interfaces and they don't need metaphors to hold their hand anymore. Something doesn't need to look exactly like a button to know you can press it. We need far less information to recognize the buttons, so we can now get rid of some of the noise. It a very common pattern when new ...


8

...to see if it is useful for our company to put some extra attention into our designs for those who are colourblind. It's not just colour-blind users who can't see certain colour combinations - actual blind people can't either, so you need to ensure data isn't represented purely visually. Webaim have some useful info on this topic that covers off the ...


8

Can you be a Web and UX Designer or a Web Designer with UX skills? Yes. (Seems like I should elaborate. In general, there is no one definition for 'UX' designer. Yes, some do only wireframes. Some do wireframes and JS. Some do JS and icon design. Some do branding and user testing. Some do research and interviews. There's a large range of skills that ...


8

Your CEO probably knows already that Marketing is a pretty precise craft that operates with data like KPI's and metrics. What he doesn't seem to know is UX does wonders for just that. Best UX practices, applied to the website/app design, will guarantee that Conversion, Retention, pageviews, visits and all other important metrics will go up. And that the ...


8

The world of screen sizes and resolutions are is a world of chaos. We could try to design for different devices ending up with many mockups, but it wouldn’t do any good. Instead, we try to design against a grid system only dependent of the width. The boundaries will change over time, but the general thought is to design for three different layouts: Desktop, ...


8

There is certainly value in ensuring continuity between an organisation's print material and website. For one thing, if a customer goes to a link promoted on a leaflet and the resulting website looks completely different, the experience feels disjointed and lacks credibility. It's important for a brand to have a consistent customer experience across all ...


7

What about something like a revs dial or speedometer? Doing it this way you can use the bar to indicate the good / bad ranges of values (colour and text), and use a pointer to show the value. Something roughly along these lines: The same concept can also be applied to a linear bar


7

Have you considered simply inverting the direction of fill to indicate which is the desired motion? Your original for 100% is the target: And when 0% is the target: EDIT: As the above is probably not really intuitive for most people, I would consider a simple nondescript token in the corner of the goal end. Here I selected border color, and ...


7

When sorting anything either a Vertical or Horizontal list of items is preferred. (but not both) A vertical list is my personal preference as many devices are built to easily scroll up and down (i.e. mouse wheel, smartphones, etc.) among other reasons. Sorting Cards in a Grid First of all, this is a great question so go ahead and vote it up now. ...


7

Removal of the failure track would be preferable, since it clutters the card, and causes a lot of "look-up" work for the reader. The combined circle is the direction I believe you should go, however; as you have stated, having multiple dice roll numbers on the circle is to much information for a single circle. My solution is to have a (Dice Roll | Failure) ...


7

Per Nielsen Norman: Chrome is the visual design elements that give users information about or commands to operate on the screen's content (as opposed to being part of that content). These design elements are provided by the underlying system — whether it be an operating system, a website, or an application — and surround the user's data. What ...


6

Lots of great answers here. I'd like to add- Many people who go into UX Design come from tons of different backgrounds. I've seen people switch into it from Psychology, Marketing, Copywriting, Development, and even engineering. Anyone who thinks they know how to empathize with the user. I myself came from a Graphic Design background. The role of UX ...


6

Empty ("negative") space can be useful in design, to unclutter a layout, draw attention to important elements, etc., as well as simply not overwhelming the viewer with information overload. Think of 19th century museums with hundreds of paintings in a room, literally cheek-by-jowl covering the walls from near the floor to nearly the [high] ceiling. Contrast ...


6

As for the UX aspect of this question, I'm going to have to say I very much doubt their effectiveness. If anything, perhaps it's because they cut off a slightly smaller part of the image within the same square dimensions: Having said that, I'm pretty sure Swarm's reason for using hexagons relates to their branding, which draws from nature's very own ...


5

I wouldn't rely on colours for the various reasons already given in the answers here. I feel that what you are really looking for is more suited to the play / pause paradigm, so perhaps the most intuitive way to handle this is to imitate the icons used to play / pause music and videos. On youtube and other video sites, a pause icon is displayed on the ...


5

My solution for deleting things is a button with a trash icon which opens a little popover. I think this is a good solution because: no disturbing dialog, everyone hates confirmation dialogs! confirmation is required. no accidential clicks user has only to read two words, no annoying question red color indicates that it is really deleted, you can empasize ...


5

Two well known articles from the by Jakob Nielsen commenting the results of usability tests on tablets running flat designs and windows 8 http://www.nngroup.com/articles/tablet-usability/ http://www.nngroup.com/articles/windows-8-disappointing-usability/ Both point in the direction that flat design leads to a loss of visual affordances. My two cents. ...



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