Hot answers tagged

93

To add to DA01's great answer, here's the history of cursor arrow. The link also links to a well known document from Xerox with further explanation, from which I took the image below. However, this document doesn't explain the reason behind the tail. This being said, the reasons for tilting explain why tilting was needed. Now I'll take the same image ...


81

It hurts the eyes Certain colors and color relationships can be eye irritants, cause headaches, and wreak havoc with human vision. Yellow, pure bright lemon yellow is the most fatiguing color. Why? The answer comes from the physics of light and optics. More light is reflected by bright colors, resulting in excessive stimulation of the eyes. ...


74

Instruct Having something like this doormat outside your front door will 'permission prime' your guests on your expectations about shoe removal. Reinforce Having your shoes on a shoe-rack on the inside of your flat will further reinforce your expectation.


73

Basic users first I assume this isn't a color theory app. If this is intended to support quick color selection with a sub-set of power users, a hybrid palette chooser / builder will work well. Make ‘easy’ easy Start with a palette-based chooser with reasonably sized swatches that simplifies the user's job of making a fast selection. Google has ...


53

It's an arrow: pictograms of arrows have mostly always had at least the arrow head and the shaft: Whoever drew the cursor as we know it was drawing an arrow. It became the default standard. You are right, it probably would work without the shaft (or tail) just as well. It's just that it's not what the UI designer chose when it was created and we've ...


52

Well, you can write the predicted year of death based on user research, or you can say "TBD" :). And more seriously - it would be a good idea to develop two templates for this item, one for dead presidents and another one for those who are still alive. The "alive" one shouldn't contain the "Died" field at all. The downside to this is that it may not be ...


50

Practical origins defined our tastes When car finishes became shiny (because they weren't always) [1,2] due to the availability of the required technology and paint materials, it was mostly for practical purposes - cost effectiveness, weather resistance, rain run-off, aerodynamics, ease of cleaning. Consumers found the attention-grabbing gleam of a shiny ...


46

It is not uncommon to take your shoes off in Europe (at least in the UK and Belgium where I've lived). However, just sticking up a sign might be seen as rude / impersonal. If all else fails it's best just to ask people to take their shoes off. Assuming that your place is clean their shouldn't be any objections (unless they've got hole in their socks). As ...


39

Is it true? No. Nor is it true that it's good UX. It's a visual design question that can only really be properly answered in context...and part of that would be how it works with the overall page design. In the particular context of the cited question... ...it is asking very specifically about Red on Pink That's a very specific combination and ...


26

I'm not sure there's any objective answer to this one, because it'll depend too much on the demographics of your clients. I'll give my subjective two cents though! If they're not graphic designers or extremely tech-savvy, I'd want to go for the most intuitive solution, which to me is the second one. In my mind, the thoughts of a user would probably go "I ...


22

Place the search box above, right Since the search applies to the list, place the search box and its label at the top of the list, on the right. The magnifying-glass icon is optional. Here are some research-based guidelines for search that back up this answer in a round-about way—these guidelines are for web sites rather than applications. A few other ...


22

You've somewhat discovered the answer to your own question. The best time to include development in the design process depends on the development team you are working with. Your initial intuition is correct...get the developers in sooner than later. Ideally, they are a part of the design process from the beginning. They have insights and ideas that can ...


21

Of course you can ask people, and of course you can put up a sign, but this is a UX question, not a . In an interaction design we wouldn't be happy putting up signs, or telling people how to behave: we want an environment that makes the desired behaviour automatic. I can't think of any any way to force this absolutely, but I think we can get pretty close: ...


21

The iPhone 5/5s/se size. There are three key reasons: More people today still own the smaller 4-inch model than the larger models. That's also not likely to change thanks to the lifespan of the iPhone and the recent release of the iPhone se. So unless you are targeting only people with larger phones, best to stick with smaller and scale up, not the ...


17

The Sharing Mockups stage is too late Assuming you want the developers fully engaged and understanding the reasoning behind the design and decisions made then you should have them in a UX Design Workshop - before mockups are done In my typical workshop I'd Explore related User Stories Itemise concepts user will be thinking about Do multiple UI ideas ...


15

All the color pickers you list are based on variations of the HSL / HSV (hue, saturation, lightness / value) color representations. Thus, their main differences are not in color theory, but simply in the placement and shape of the controls. That said, the second color picker in your list has one major disadvantage compared to the others: it doesn't have ...


15

tl;dr Social confirmation is a good thing in most cases. Don't give up on it until you've exhausted all your options. Then try, try again. Reviews are not a required feature Not every site has the volume or customer interest to generate a lot of [good] reviews. I have personally seen this in two contexts: A product line that was primarily ...


11

@DavidGrinberg has a good point about most users not caring about having more than a small number of colors to choose from. However you can cater to both that group and people who want more choices with an interface supporting progressive enhancement. Microsoft's provided one with Windows for many years. I had trouble finding newer screenshots in English; ...


11

Review's aren't always necessary or helpful I disagree with other posters who espouse the view that social reviews are desirable per se and one should exhaust efforts to enable social reviews on a site. There is nothing magical about social reviews: they are simply another design feature of a site which has pros and cons, and serves an objective. Reviews ...


11

Start with subtle clues, slowly becoming more direct. As is commonly advised to writers; show, don't tell. People like making decisions on their own, but they also generally want to make others feel good. And especially in new environments and situations, we mimic. It's all about gradually going from subliminal cues to explicitly stating the intended ...


10

You may find this thread relevant. In a nutshell, it's a legacy design trait from typewriter days, and there hasn't been much reason to change it. Why are keyboard keys staggered? This is largely a case of path dependency. Originally keyboards had to have a staggered layout to fit the mechanical linkages between the keys and the levers. After ...


9

Standard health-and-safety advice is to have your eyeline level with the top of your monitor: So extrapolating that out to TVs - Typical sofa's have seat height lower than office chairs. ~40-45cm (17-18") off the ground. Example (there are loads like this on Google Images): So you need to have the TV lower to accomodate that, especially as they're ...


8

In general, it's much easier to scale a design up from a smaller screen size to a larger screen size. So I always start with whichever is going to be the smallest device. When you're scaling up, you can always add whitespace and have a balanced design, but you have no such option when scaling down.


7

Trends... There has been a general positive trend over the last 15 years for designers to take on larger and larger scope of responsibilities within the product development process 15 years ago in the "Microsoft" era of formal software development, human-computer interaction, visual design, or information architecture were specific disciplines in design, ...


7

I don't know where you might find the sort of specific data you're looking for; if it exists, it's likely to be proprietary, internal research done by petrol companies (maybe you could ask your supplier?). But I think you'd need to be cautious with that data anyway, because it's bound to depend a lot on your specific situation. There's no doubt that, all ...


7

Leftmost column for left-to-right readers and vice-versa. Left-to-right readers will see the checkbox at the very beginning of scanning the row. So they will start scanning knowing that there is a possibility that cells can be selected in bulk (or at least their subconscious knows since it has registered the checkbox). Later on, if there is a need to ...


7

To answer this question (as well as many other on UX) we have to start with user stories. Story A. User requires frequent access to navigation elements and these elements are in the header. Then, yes, it's better to fix the header and don't let it go with the scrolling. Story B. Critical information is displayed in the header. Then it's better to keep it ...


6

This is a complex situation and I feel like a lot more info is needed. However, there's a part where an answer can be provided, and it's whether to mix (or not) the times. And the answer is NO. Check your own screen capture: you have 22h, then 14d and even 13m. And according to your description, these times are measuring different actions (one is for a ...


6

look at how your finger points it could also be a wrist. people also see based on shapes and the cursor as is has more breaks and easily stands out on top of pages than a triangle. Also a right handed person pointing explains the direction of the cursor. Read more about it from the question why the cursor is tilted and not straight


6

Yes, there are two universally accepted academic UI guidelines: Nielsen usability guidelines and Shneidermann's Also, a you can use the Hicks law and Fitts law. However, you said the "minimum physical size of a touchable UI element" - this is actually wrong because according to the Fitts law the bigger the object the faster a person can reach it. ...



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