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166

Here in Finland the main reason is this: Image source Road markings are used to denote speed limits but never as a primary mean. And as Jung Lee points out, re-applying road paint is labor intensive, especially here, as studded tyres usually erode most of the paint in one or two winters. Edit: The Finnish law actually states that road markings, such as ...


90

To add to DA01's great answer, here's the history of cursor arrow. The link also links to a well known document from Xerox with further explanation, from which I took the image below. However, this document doesn't explain the reason behind the tail. This being said, the reasons for tilting explain why tilting was needed. Now I'll take the same image ...


70

Basic users first I assume this isn't a color theory app. If this is intended to support quick color selection with a sub-set of power users, a hybrid palette chooser / builder will work well. Make ‘easy’ easy Start with a palette-based chooser with reasonably sized swatches that simplifies the user's job of making a fast selection. Google has ...


53

It's an arrow: pictograms of arrows have mostly always had at least the arrow head and the shaft: Whoever drew the cursor as we know it was drawing an arrow. It became the default standard. You are right, it probably would work without the shaft (or tail) just as well. It's just that it's not what the UI designer chose when it was created and we've ...


52

Well, you can write the predicted year of death based on user research, or you can say "TBD" :). And more seriously - it would be a good idea to develop two templates for this item, one for dead presidents and another one for those who are still alive. The "alive" one shouldn't contain the "Died" field at all. The downside to this is that it may not be ...


41

I would say there are a couple of aspects here Line of sight : Though while driving your line of sight is mainly on the road, the main point of focus is at object ahead of you straight ahead (e.g. a vehicle going ahead). Hence writing the speed signs on the road would have to require the person driving to focus down and assimilate the information which ...


41

You read as you approach. Theoretically. In reality, levels of visual acuity mean that some people (like you and I) can read the whole block at once. Another reason that painting information on the pavement isn't always ideal. Here's a good visual for how this is designed to function in practice: The trick is (as the image above shows) the spacing of ...


27

If the data is tabular, then I see no reason why one shouldn't go with tables? After all, the whole purpose of table element is for showing such type of data. But if your query is how to make the tabular data look more beautiful, then read this article - http://darkhorseanalytics.com/blog/clear-off-the-table/ In nutshell, it follows the principle of 'Less ...


27

I'm not sure there's any objective answer to this one, because it'll depend too much on the demographics of your clients. I'll give my subjective two cents though! If they're not graphic designers or extremely tech-savvy, I'd want to go for the most intuitive solution, which to me is the second one. In my mind, the thoughts of a user would probably go "I ...


25

It depends on what behavior is being changed Milton Glaser created the following illustration he calls "The Road To Hell", which shows gradients in design ethics: For most cases in The Road to Hell, the design objective is to convince users to buy something. But the illustration shows that the nature of the product and the type of designed behavior can ...


23

Besides the snow-covered roads—a very clear reason but only applicable in a small number of cases—there are several vision-related explanations. The first one is simply geometrical. On an empty road, a traffic sign remains for a long time close to the centre of the driver's field of view (where vision is sharpest) and can be seen from far away. It gets off ...


22

Place the search box above, right Since the search applies to the list, place the search box and its label at the top of the list, on the right. The magnifying-glass icon is optional. Here are some research-based guidelines for search that back up this answer in a round-about way—these guidelines are for web sites rather than applications. A few other ...


22

You've somewhat discovered the answer to your own question. The best time to include development in the design process depends on the development team you are working with. Your initial intuition is correct...get the developers in sooner than later. Ideally, they are a part of the design process from the beginning. They have insights and ideas that can ...


21

Do signs printed on the road offer a significant advantage for the user over signs on a post? Let's make a matrix: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- | On Road | On Sign ...


20

In complete agreement with the other answers, but to provide an alternate viewpoint: If you were driving at night, your headlights will reveal the beginning of the sentence before the end.


17

The Sharing Mockups stage is too late Assuming you want the developers fully engaged and understanding the reasoning behind the design and decisions made then you should have them in a UX Design Workshop - before mockups are done In my typical workshop I'd Explore related User Stories Itemise concepts user will be thinking about Do multiple UI ideas ...


15

All the color pickers you list are based on variations of the HSL / HSV (hue, saturation, lightness / value) color representations. Thus, their main differences are not in color theory, but simply in the placement and shape of the controls. That said, the second color picker in your list has one major disadvantage compared to the others: it doesn't have ...


12

In addition to the ones mentioned by others, here are additional considerations: Road paint is more labor intensive to install initially. Road paint is more labor intensive to maintain as well because road needs to be repaved every few years and/or potholes filled. But more importantly, road paint is slippery in wet weather. (well known concerns among ...


10

Couple of reasons: When driving there are often cars ahead, so anything written on the road can be obscured. The same is true with street signs, but it's not nearly as bad. Drivers look forward and straight. Signs are usually off to either side of the road, where both a driver and passenger can see. Thus the signs are a little easier to view for all ...


10

You may find this thread relevant. In a nutshell, it's a legacy design trait from typewriter days, and there hasn't been much reason to change it. Why are keyboard keys staggered? This is largely a case of path dependency. Originally keyboards had to have a staggered layout to fit the mechanical linkages between the keys and the levers. After ...


10

@DavidGrinberg has a good point about most users not caring about having more than a small number of colors to choose from. However you can cater to both that group and people who want more choices with an interface supporting progressive enhancement. Microsoft's provided one with Windows for many years. I had trouble finding newer screenshots in English; ...


8

There is certainly value in ensuring continuity between an organisation's print material and website. For one thing, if a customer goes to a link promoted on a leaflet and the resulting website looks completely different, the experience feels disjointed and lacks credibility. It's important for a brand to have a consistent customer experience across all ...


8

Per Nielsen Norman: Chrome is the visual design elements that give users information about or commands to operate on the screen's content (as opposed to being part of that content). These design elements are provided by the underlying system — whether it be an operating system, a website, or an application — and surround the user's data. What ...


7

Extreme Environmental Conditions Similar to conditions in Finland, as shown by @locationunknown, locations in India suffer problems as well. Where monsoon damages roads every year. Imagine speed limits and other markings on road would never be seen on these roads. Other constraints here in India, why speed limits are not on road is the sheer ...


7

I don't know where you might find the sort of specific data you're looking for; if it exists, it's likely to be proprietary, internal research done by petrol companies (maybe you could ask your supplier?). But I think you'd need to be cautious with that data anyway, because it's bound to depend a lot on your specific situation. There's no doubt that, all ...


7

Leftmost column for left-to-right readers and vice-versa. Left-to-right readers will see the checkbox at the very beginning of scanning the row. So they will start scanning knowing that there is a possibility that cells can be selected in bulk (or at least their subconscious knows since it has registered the checkbox). Later on, if there is a need to ...


6

There are certain sports where a neck-proximate pocket would make sense, but given the shape of this particular pocket I'm almost positive it's decorative and not functional. For road cycling, where a rider is crouched, side or chest pockets are hard to reach so a neck-proximate pocket could provide betterUX. For climbing, a climber's chest is often close to ...


6

Your current approach is heading in the right direction. When your users use this data regularly, they will already know the relationship between the groups. Switching background color is one way of creating contrast between groups. Other ways would be to use line separators and white space. One thing you can have do to make it more obvious is by ...


6

The job of a UX designer is not to make sure the product makes sense, it's to lead the user to the end goal. For many of us, that's to get the user to buy something or spend money in some way. The question of ethics plays little role there: to drive the business you need revenue, and that comes from a UX that promotes making purchases. That said, it is ...


6

"If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses." - Henry Ford I understand the dilemma. I do agree with @Jamezrp. We as UX designers/engineers are between the function of the system, business objectives of the firms we consult/work with, and the most importantly the user who is going to use the system to meet his personal ...



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