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I believe there's some sort of misconception here. How good a design is is not in correlation with how expensive or premium something seems. A design can't be "too good" for its users. In the package of design (the art of applying knowledge and best practices into a solution) knowing one's target group and speaking to that target group accordingly is also ...


22

Ryanair (Eurpean Airline based in Ireland) used to trade on their 'we are very cheap and we provide absolutely no frills at all' service And used to have a suitably cheap and nasty website to match ( all garish colours and animated gifs ) Since they changed strategy recently to not ""unnecessarily piss people off (see quote below from their CEO ) " ...


4

Since you are selling something (you mention online shop), this could be a risk. Some research suggests that users may opt for uglyness over a design that is 'too good'. In a simple study comparing two banner adverts, the one with the crude design and bad fonts achieved a click-through-rate of 0.11% compared with only 0.07% for the more professional ...


3

Whether they have a right to do so is purely a political/corporate org/process question. Whether they should or not is entirely dependent on their abilities/expertise. In either case, the challenge is how do you handle it as the UX person? Some suggestions: always have business partner input formatted in the form of a user story if possible. The idea is ...


2

I try to ask as much about what the user does instead of what the user might want. For instance, if I'm trying to improve a user's workflow, I'll ask: clarify what the user is trying to accomplish what is the current workflow? what is the hardest/most annoying/time-consuming part of the workflow? what are the users current hacks to get around the ...


2

My experience is with a range of complex applications needing a significant UX rework. The corporate UX strategy group concluded that our users give us a large degree of latitude for change providing that the quality of UX work is very high. To understand this better, consider the reasons for resistance: Changes in the way system operates Creates loss ...


1

Well if you look at Product Owner's (PO's) role from the SCRUM perspective, it's the PO job to write stories that indicate what users wants to do and why, then prioritize the list of stories and provide additional requirements as needed. In terms of how the user's goal is accomplished, which includes the UI & technology, that's really not the PO's job. ...


1

(Not so much a fully stand alone answer, as an interesting affirmation of certain ideas expressed already in other answers) There is a Dutch supermarket chain that throws a lot of money at market research and data analysis (at least compared to the other chains here). Their own brands follow a nice marketing trick where they offer three product versions in ...


1

I think we should understand that design is not a thing: design /dɪˈzʌɪn/ noun purpose, planning, or intention that exists or is thought to exist behind an action, fact, or material object. a plan or drawing produced to show the look and function or workings of a building, garment, or other object before it is made. a decorative ...


1

To add to AndroidHustle's answer or present it more theoretically, it seems that design can't possibly be too good. You can think of design as the practice of communicating something in the presence of some constraint. Assume a design is some embodiment of "optimal", at or past a threshold of what may be considered "too good". This presents a situation where ...


1

You have quite information-loaded application. This could negatively affect user and lead to bad usability. I'd recommend to use progressive disclosure pattern, in a way it is defined in the article: Progressive Disclosure- the best interaction design technique? Progressive disclosure is an interaction design technique that sequences information and ...


1

The best metaphor I've used for this type of project management breakdown is the layered pages metaphor. Basecamp uses this to great effect. When you move into a project, the deeper level appears as a page layer floating above the last level. This way you maintain a sense of depth and location, and the titles of the deeper layers become links back there, ...



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