Hot answers tagged

1167

Both ways seem to pose a false-positive paradigm. This can be simpler and not have to force the user to spend time making sense of the color-to-label association. Simply make the "Delete" button more prominent. Make the "Cancel" button less prominent. In regards to the labeling within the buttons, there is no need to put much context into what essentially ...


267

I'm not so sure you should be thinking only in terms of red and green. Red has typically been associated with danger, potentially dating back to the middle ages (citation needed). A quick Google image search for "delete" yields almost entirely red images. To me (and to bootstrap) green indicates success, red indicates danger. As deleting is a dangerous ...


193

Looking at this from a slightly different angle, where possible you could consider removing the confirmation entirely and switching instead to an "Do/Undo" process. This method is often used across the Google services: It has the advantages that it's culturally neutral and more efficient for the user (one-click rather than two to delete). Disadvantage ...


166

Here in Finland the main reason is this: Image source Road markings are used to denote speed limits but never as a primary mean. And as Jung Lee points out, re-applying road paint is labor intensive, especially here, as studded tyres usually erode most of the paint in one or two winters. Edit: The Finnish law actually states that road markings, such as ...


116

I'm guessing they viewed the button on the right hand side as the primary action button as it's closer to the users thumb, with the button on the left for secondary/less-used action, as it's slightly further away from the thumb (more of a physical exertion on the user). They then may have wanted to label them accordingly - so A for primary button, B for ...


110

With all due respect, I think every answer so far has missed the mark somewhat. First of all, based on the Context section of your question ... Context Before deleting an album, the user is asked to confirm the action. ... we can deduce that this is not a success or error modal, but rather it is a confirmation modal, which implies a warning or ...


92

To add to DA01's great answer, here's the history of cursor arrow. The link also links to a well known document from Xerox with further explanation, from which I took the image below. However, this document doesn't explain the reason behind the tail. This being said, the reasons for tilting explain why tilting was needed. Now I'll take the same image ...


74

Instruct Having something like this doormat outside your front door will 'permission prime' your guests on your expectations about shoe removal. Reinforce Having your shoes on a shoe-rack on the inside of your flat will further reinforce your expectation.


73

Basic users first I assume this isn't a color theory app. If this is intended to support quick color selection with a sub-set of power users, a hybrid palette chooser / builder will work well. Make ‘easy’ easy Start with a palette-based chooser with reasonably sized swatches that simplifies the user's job of making a fast selection. Google has ...


58

I was on the Excel team when this was designed. Backstory If you remember the version of Excel right before you could have multiple worksheets, that version had a concept, IIRC called WORKSPACES, that let you link multiple worksheets into a workspace which could be opened and closed together. The idea was that if you had 7 spreadsheets, one macro sheet, ...


55

I think the process of producing software is much more efficient if the designers (or those that contribute to the design) have a strong technical understanding of the medium. For instance, in designing a website it helps to understand what can be achieved via CSS because if you design things that can't be expressed with CSS and require images instead (or ...


53

It's an arrow: pictograms of arrows have mostly always had at least the arrow head and the shaft: Whoever drew the cursor as we know it was drawing an arrow. It became the default standard. You are right, it probably would work without the shaft (or tail) just as well. It's just that it's not what the UI designer chose when it was created and we've ...


52

Well, you can write the predicted year of death based on user research, or you can say "TBD" :). And more seriously - it would be a good idea to develop two templates for this item, one for dead presidents and another one for those who are still alive. The "alive" one shouldn't contain the "Died" field at all. The downside to this is that it may not be ...


47

I would argue the answer is neither. Firstly, your assumption that an analog and digital clock take up the same space is wrong. Analog clocks are circular, and fit a square, while digital clocks are more rectangular, unless you intend to have an unintuitive layout. Allowing a user to pick one or the other means having wasted negative space horizontally ...


46

This is a similar question to the one about ATMs, and a similar approach could be adopted. Since modern machines can detect that there is an original on the glass (or in the ADF), it would suffice to prevent access to the copies until the original is removed. For that, the completed copies would have to remain inside the machine behind a door which is only ...


46

It is not uncommon to take your shoes off in Europe (at least in the UK and Belgium where I've lived). However, just sticking up a sign might be seen as rude / impersonal. If all else fails it's best just to ask people to take their shoes off. Assuming that your place is clean their shouldn't be any objections (unless they've got hole in their socks). As ...


42

Don't do that, there are different approaches to filling out values, and for some it would be disruptive. For example if the user just wants to change the last digit... A good, non-disruptive alternative would be a small "clear input" button.


41

I would say there are a couple of aspects here Line of sight : Though while driving your line of sight is mainly on the road, the main point of focus is at object ahead of you straight ahead (e.g. a vehicle going ahead). Hence writing the speed signs on the road would have to require the person driving to focus down and assimilate the information which ...


41

You read as you approach. Theoretically. In reality, levels of visual acuity mean that some people (like you and I) can read the whole block at once. Another reason that painting information on the pavement isn't always ideal. Here's a good visual for how this is designed to function in practice: The trick is (as the image above shows) the spacing of ...


39

For anyone mathematically inclined, the answer is to use a log scale. For non-mathematical people, you may be better off showing a break in the chart and then the extreme value.


39

It depends on what is more vital for users — «love to retrostyle» or effectiveness (speed of reading without mistakes). The following illustration from Handbook of Aviation Human Factors represents how effective are digital visualizations of altitude in comparison with classic analog gauges both for expert and novice users:


39

I believe there's some sort of misconception here. How good a design is is not in correlation with how expensive or premium something seems. A design can't be "too good" for its users. In the package of design (the art of applying knowledge and best practices into a solution) knowing one's target group and speaking to that target group accordingly is also ...


36

While for the end-user, the "less-is-more" theory tends to be a huge win, you've got to get into the client's shoes to get where this opposition comes from. The short answer is: they want to 'get what they're paying for.' I usually find myself in the sometimes awkward space mediating between board members, designers and the rest of the development team ...


35

Users are more likely to think twice before clicking on something that is red. For which one of the two options do you want them to think twice before clicking? Which one of the two choices will potentially trigger more irreversible events? Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red#Warning_and_danger


35

You could have the input value selected when the user clicks on the input. This way the user can just press backspace or start typing to change the value or copy the value instantly.


34

It's not psychology; it's purely physical. The reason is that the perpendicular ridges are easy for pedestrians to walk on, but bumpy for cyclists; and the in-line ridges are easy for cyclists and harder for pedestrians. Note that this is at the entry of the cycle lane. It's not designed to alert cyclists that their lane is ending; it's designed to make ...


32

To answer your questions very directly: Is it acceptable to have a 4.0-like layout on older versions of Android (e.g. 2.1)? Yes. It's fine, in general, to use Holo styling on earlier versions of the platform. There are certainly elements of the Android 4.0 interaction palette that may be a bit jarring to users at first (for example the contextual ...


29

If the data is tabular, then I see no reason why one shouldn't go with tables? After all, the whole purpose of table element is for showing such type of data. But if your query is how to make the tabular data look more beautiful, then read this article - http://darkhorseanalytics.com/blog/clear-off-the-table/ In nutshell, it follows the principle of 'Less ...


28

Disable the submit button as soon as it's been pressed and show a message (or similar) to indicate the action is being processed. Disabling the button prevents repeat clicking and feedback lets the user know that something is happening. Sometimes it can seem a bit like the feedback comes back too quickly, and users can feel more comfortable if they see a ...



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