Hot answers tagged

21

Of course you can ask people, and of course you can put up a sign, but this is a UX question, not a . In an interaction design we wouldn't be happy putting up signs, or telling people how to behave: we want an environment that makes the desired behaviour automatic. I can't think of any any way to force this absolutely, but I think we can get pretty close: ...


20

The iPhone 5/5s/se size. There are three key reasons: More people today still own the smaller 4-inch model than the larger models. That's also not likely to change thanks to the lifespan of the iPhone and the recent release of the iPhone se. So unless you are targeting only people with larger phones, best to stick with smaller and scale up, not the ...


8

In general, it's much easier to scale a design up from a smaller screen size to a larger screen size. So I always start with whichever is going to be the smallest device. When you're scaling up, you can always add whitespace and have a balanced design, but you have no such option when scaling down.


5

First, ensure that any data entered by the user is being temporarily saved. It's horrible to go to effort of filling out a long form only to have everything erased because a session timed out or you accidentally left the page. Consider using inline validation and perhaps encouraging statements. They shouldn't be patronizing or too chummy. But showing a ...


5

I suggest you have a look at the article "Icon Classification: Resemblance, Reference, and Arbitrary Icons" by Jacob Nielsen. According to Nielsen, there are three broad categories of icons: resemblance, reference and arbitrary icons. His studies seem to suggest that: Resemblance icons usually have the best usability, though an arbitrary icon can be ...


5

Why not just ask your guests to take off their shoes as they come in? Unlike a sign, it can't be interpreted as being pushy. At least in my experience, I've never felt that someone asking me to take off my shoes is being uptight, and I've never seen or heard of someone being annoyed by being asked to take off their shoes. I don't think I would pick up the ...


4

Emotional design is a term popularised by Don Norman to explain why "attractive things work better” to address the criticism of his previous book that he was advocating 'usable but ugly' products. 'attractive products trigger our creativity and ultimately expand our mental processes, making us more tolerant of minor difficulties. What he is saying is ...


3

Some recomendations on getting the higher conversion rate with the long forms: Make the labels clear for users. Dont't make them think (a lot), work on the language and tone Group the fields in a logical way. So the users a) focus on some aspect (Address, Contacts, etc.), b) have a rest after filling some set of fields, c) enjoy when some part of ...


3

Additional to Midas answer; Emotional Design is very broad question and there are many sub-category of emotional design. As in appraisal-stimuli theory, the product and concern of the user point leads to appraisal that evokes an emotion. Designing with such a mindset can be described as emotional design or design for emotion. Designers need to block ...


3

Delays are significant for UX. Some solutions and patterns used in UI which work smoothly (feels instantaneous) with BASE to be problematic with ACID due intolerable response delays.


3

This is an extension to Andrew Martin's answer, and the short comment discussion. I point to Andrew's answer as the short and simple correct answer: Database construction and manipulation should never affect the UX design. The rebuttal to Andrew's correct answer is one that we hear all too often: ground realities are different. Database design and ...


3

Database design is critical! As are all architectural decisions. This is why a software architect should be a part of the UXD process. The choice of back-end architecture isn't something the UXD can decide, but user-facing factors can be evaluated from a UX perspective. These database considerations will impact product experience: Is the product highly ...


3

Database construction and manipulation should never affect the UX design. The design of the database should facilitate and optimise whatever processes the server-side operations require. As this takes place server-side it should have no impact on client-side and therefore no impact on UX design. The only possible impact a database could have on UX is if ...


3

This is one of the main areas of interest in semiotics and as such, it's vastly covered, although there are 2 main theories from which posterior theories emerge. These theories have more than 100 years and are the theoretical support for modern design, starting from first wave of linguistics , then Bauhaus and coming to these days. To make it short, these ...


2

If your portfolio is going to target tech savvy and creative people, I guess its ok to go experimental. A diagonal or a more unique approach would impress this group of user. However if you intend to show your website to a broader group of users, you might want to tread on the safe side. A more conventional layout such as layout 3 would appeal to them and ...


2

Those are two sets of related but different concepts; mental/conceptual model, and framework/roadmap. The difference between a mental model and a conceptual model is described well in this article. Mental Model v Conceptual Model A mental model represents a person’s thought process for how something works (i.e., a person’s understanding of the ...


1

Typically users want quick answers to questions. Users want the good filtered from the bad. On a sales website you would not expect a travel company to expose a holidays negative points. A comparison site you would expect an immediate comparison in the form of a 1/5 or star rating. Then maybe 200 character synopsis. The user has already made a decision to ...


1

To me the difference between a product designer and an UX designer would be that a product designer deals more with the question of what the product should do, while an UX designer deals with the question of how the product should deliver what it does. In other words: product design is about what benefits the product should bring its users - and UX ...


1

Product designer - Designing the product so that it is robust in terms of design able to accommodate various requirements, scenarios, features and user flows. like an ecosystem where stakeholders can expand and optimize the product easily using what's already there. e.g. the product already been designed to accommodate a new module, with minimum redesign ...


1

Good question. These are very closely related in product teams. UX designers will typically conduct user interviews and other various user testing methods to get in the minds of the product users. It's designing with the mind in mind. UX designers should be dependent on users for a design layout. Product designers work closely with ux designers in that ...


1

It will be better if it mateches with the UI. Its a good UX. For example, when I use Photoshop extensions or plugins, it comes with their own UI, Which makes me think that accidently I opened a different application. If you follow the same UI design guidlines that will sync with the application.


1

A conclusive opinion on this case would be subjective. However, it can be safely noted that over the years the jack has apparently found a position which provides users the best experience, the topside. By not placing the jacks on either the left or the right sides, the phone could be classified as truly ambidextrous, and would be easier to handle. The ...


1

A value proposition creates value for customer segment through distinct mix of elements catering to that segment's needs. Value can be quantitative (Price, speed of service) or qualitative ( quality, experience..). Some value propositions may be innovative and create a new or disruptive choice to people while some value propositions are similar ...


1

Emotional design is to design with an emotional intent. All design is emotional, but by focusing on personal concern/values and meaning, designers intend to evoke targeted emotions by taking directed design decisions. We are not able to design the emotion in itself, therefore it is common practice to talk about 'design for emotion'. We create the context in ...


1

I'd give a try of placing a shoe cabinet straight against the door (of the hallway size allows that, of course) so that you'd have to pass by its side on entrance. In this case, the shoe cabinet would act as a barrier on the entry and would naturally remind of itself by stopping the natural pathway course.


1

My home is a shoe-free zone as well. Our family uses a shoe rack and our guests typically leave their shoes in a pile next to whatever shoes we used that day. Whenever we'll having groups of people over we tell them in advance, "...oh and by the way we're a shoe-free home just so you're not thrown off we when you see the big pile of shoes by the door".


1

Supporting legacy browsers can add significant costs to development and those costs compound when considering maintenance of the code. Legacy browser support shouldn't be as problematic if your methods of building the site/application make use of progressive enhancement. For example, CSS is great when browsers ignore features it can't support. Nothing ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible