Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Of the sites you mention, there's no good design or usability reason they are left justified. It's probably inattention to design and/or adherence to legacy design. (FWIW: You don't need a wrapper to center a simple webpage. You can do it with body {width:960px; margin:0 auto;} in the CSS.)


6

... also, sorry for thread hijacking, but I think it would be worth mentioning the gestalt principles and Andy Rutledge's excellent series of articles about using it to make the visuals more 'navigatable': Gestalt Principles of Perception 1: Figure Ground Relationships Gestalt Principles of Perception 2: Similarity Gestalt Principles of Perception 3: ...


5

Motor Decision, not Goal Decision The Hicks-Hyman law is traditionally about deciding on the motor response, not the outcome goal. As you note in Examples 1 and 2, the users already know the outcome goal (close the window, set “Country” to United States) often before they even see the menu. In experiments validating Hicks-Hyman, often the experimenter gives ...


4

So I've been thinking about this, and I think we can model it with a combination of Fitt's and Hick's laws. Assume that the quick buttons are unordered, so time to find the correct one is linear The menu is ordered, so it's the logarithmic Hick's. The user first looks to see if it's on the quick button menu, and then looks on the menu. The distance moved ...


4

I would start by reading The Universal Principles of Design a indispensable book in my opinion. There is also some science to what we find pleasing but there is probably plenty of work to be done in that field. Check out Keith Langs video The Science of Aesthetics.


4

I can't speak for what other websites you are seeing "increasingly switching to color based buttons and interaction elements", as it's not a trend I've noticed exactly, but as for Bootstrap - as the Bootstrap twitter blog states: Bootstrap contains nothing but CSS, meaning there are no superfluous images, Flash, or Javascript. All that remains is ...


4

One of my favorite concepts from design is: Great design isn't when you run out of things to add, it's when you run out of things to take away. The concept of a minimalist approach in UX, from personal experience and various sources, is about removing those elements which get in the way of the user's primary goal. Take most modern browsers, which have been ...


4

I'd say Hicks law refer to stimuli recognition rather than searching. Recognition processes work at cognitive level, so people are right saying about cognitive decision time. This processes rather simple, as it is pointed in the papers. In complex situations decision involves not only cognitive processes but takes long-term memory, reasoning etc. This is ...


3

I don't have a scientifically backed answer, but it seems to me that the key aspect of Hicks law is that the decisions be significantly non-obvious. For example, if I'm at the grocery store and have to choose from 10 brands of peanut butter, that's going to take time for a lot of people as there is no obvious one choice. They need to study labels, prices, ...


3

Would anyone feel differently, I wonder: I find a lot of the feel for left-aligned web sites is connected with small, rectangular components. Much like a spreadsheet, that starts off in the top-left corner, and spreads out more strongly in a vertical/downward direction than horizontal/rightward direction. Moreso than small/rectangular elements, I'd expect ...


3

In my point of view the header should stand out in contrast of the content. Keeping the header clear and simple makes it much easier to find out who the site belongs to and what you can do there. If you compare Usability First to Amazon website - I find Usability First easier to navigate. Amazon takes much longer to understand and luckely they have a huge ...


3

The question can't be reduced to a visually distinct header. The rule of thumb for navigation controls is the same controls in the same place throughout the site. A visually distinct navigation menu helps the user recognize the controls, and tell apart content from navigation. Whether it should be distinct is usually determined by esthetics more than ...


2

Whether you are using icons or colours on buttons, the reasons should be the same - you're trying to communicate something by using them. Comparing icons to colours and asking which is better will get you the age old response. It depends. They are different and each may be a better choice in a different situation. Generally, colour draws attention to ...


2

A substractive filter makes sense when you have a limited amount of results to start from (e.g. filter for finding email in Gmail and Microsoft Outlook). An additive filter makes sense if you are searching in a near infinite range and want to bring back a finite amount of results (e.g. default in Google search). The most accurate results are received by ...


1

Actually, Hick intended to predict kind of both, assuming that the time to act is of similar complexity order throughout options (i.e., you have to choose between two menu items which you will click, not one click and one keystroke). He does not seem to differentiate search and decision; to mention your examples, as one knows which country they want to ...


1

Both Nielsen and less is more are saying the same thing. And it's neither minimalism nor maximalism, but perhaps maximin: maximizing the utility from minimal space. The less is more is about prioritizing the information/functionality that is most needed by the user up front and presenting the less used information/functionality in a less obtrusive way than ...


1

Ok, so I am going to disagree and agree with both approaches. Personally I believe that Tufte's famous ink usage idea is idiocy from the start. This philosophy is one without thresholds or balance. It literally values information density to the point where writing your reports on a grain of rice would be considered ideal. Information density is bad ux if ...


1

Both viewpoints are really saying the same thing: that every bit of information on a page should convey some useful information. Whether it be Tufte's idea of ink density or the redesign of major websites to contain only a few large buttons, both are intent upon stripping the design down to the barest frame necessary to serve their purpose. Additional ...


1

The decision to left align or center align is best determined by the type of website. Data driven sites left align for maximum screen width. Task based websites and applications rely on muscle memory so left aligning better supports users. Applications are increasingly cloud based so they feel like websites (Salesforce app-not the website), and usually left ...


1

Legacy. In the past, the browser treated the top left corner of the page as the origin and built the page from there. On smaller screens, the top left corner of the page will always appear (and thus it's good to make your design built so that you know the user will see it (and thus your navigation) from the beginning rather than risk it being hidden from ...


1

Indeed, centered-content design has more visual "white-space" around it which can make it appear more symmetrical. However, there is generally no difference in the informational value and interaction when the layout is centered. In most cases it's very subjective - just the result of a designers opinion.


1

Well, if pulling some starting data for the beginning of a subtractive process isn't too intensive I think that it has some advantages. With a subtractive process the user is presented with more information about the data. This information might help them decided how to filter and narrow down on what they really want. This way users might have less of a ...


1

There are design principles called Proximity, Alignment, Repetition and Contrast. See The Non-Designers Design Book by Robin William (recommendable). She uses the term contrast in a large sense: not only contrasting colors, but also contrasting font sizes, font families etc ("different things should look different".)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible