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Content is one of the biggest headaches on any large website, and especially in large enterprise environments with multiple stakeholders. Document until it stops saving you time This means putting a lot of time and manpower in to doing something that you are always being told NOT to do, so expect to be challenged and questioned. Decision If it's an ...


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Yes. Your information architecture can be presented as wireframes or prototypes that show the particular pictures/elements you will be using (this will be medium fidelity) If you only have a little time before the first meeting, it's ok to show a tree diagram for the information architecture and then explain what to the stakeholders what to anticipate for ...


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First of all, there is a need to prove it does have a negative influence on usability. So yes, test or study is due. It might uncover marketing team was right or that nobody was right. Then there is a question on what exactly you mean by "what to do with this". If this is about go/no go, it should be a decision of the Product Owner. If the marketing is ...


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Definitely test test test and film the users reactions to the feature. A film of a user completely dismissing a feature will win over any decision maker...


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Work with the team that introduced the feature to understand their underlying goal. Collaborate with them to conduct user research to determine whether the feature meets their underlying goal, as well as what its impact is on the user experience. Collaborate with them to identify solutions to the problems that are uncovered in the user research and work ...


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Before my answer, let's just clarify: MVP is about sending a product to market really really quickly, in order to gather as much information about business benefits and user needs as possible, and using that information to change and improve the product in a series of rapid iterations. Yes? If so, you will need two processes. 1: A long-term process that ...


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Aggressivley limit scope The 2-week iteration has been grossly abused in the name of Agility®. Iterating on something in two weeks doesn't mean you have something ready for users in two weeks. It just means you completed a defined scope. So the trick is, set yourself up for success. Carefully prepare for that iteration by selecting a piece of work that is ...


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The team I work on uses 2-week sprints and for its presentation relies on internally-built as well as third-party UI framework components. But those are usually for some "common" changes and features. Something new and top-notch cannot fit in a 2-week UX design period at all...


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Test it That's all there is to it. Every feature has to have a purpose. Clearly state the reason behind this terrible thing marketing did and identify a way to measure it's impact. If it fails the test, it has to go. That's just good business. Choose the right metrics Kerry Rodden at Google Ventures developed the HEART framework to assist in determining ...


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From my experience, every feature implemented on the site has to have some form of KPI (key performance index) or score assigned to it. The KPI/score can be used to measure & track, the usefulness of the feature users, Or the value that it bring to the site / business (SEO improvement, convergence, user/customer engagement). Have periodic review of the ...


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The best way to make the project move quickly depends on your personal schedule and where you can fit in what. Sometimes, you can cut back time on research, if you are luckily familiar with the audience/task. You can use design patterns. Using patterns saves a lot of time and is a common practice. Here is a list of 10 sites that can help you with this. ...


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There isn't really one best way of handling this. I've seen different systems used successfully, and those same systems used unsuccessfully when poorly applied. However, depending on the complexity of the site, I find it useful to start off with some rough page flow diagrams, which look like really nasty wireframes (I'm only interested in what action opens ...


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It sounds like you've already looked at the company, it's strategies, goals and products, and how they want to interact with their users. That will help guide you. You mentioned you haven't do logo design or web design before. Have you looked into visual communication? That's the practice of taking a message and conveying it in visual form. I did alot ...


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UX is something you have to test actively from day one, and keep on testing while the product develops. Beware! It's super easy to forget about UX testing while you are pushing the developers hard and everybody is working like hell in your team. UX testing has to be part of your Definition of Done! Meaning that no "story" should be considered as Done, if ...


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Initially I was finding it difficult to match my standard ux design process to Kanban, but after a little while it started to work. It took a lot of changing and rethinking stuff though. This was a bit of inspiration for me: http://kanbantool.com/blog/kanban-for-ux-design


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When ever you add an item and then when you are going to edit an item, we should have prompt message for save are cancel the added item. same message should be displayed once we have edited the sub item too. there should be final save button to the whole process then user can understand its the final call for the form. this is my view.



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