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84

Luke Wroblewski wrote about this in Top, Right or Left Aligned Form Labels (April, 2007). In it, he references eyetracking data from an article by Matteo Penzo called Label Placement in Forms (July, 2006). Matteo drew several conclusions from this study, including that right-aligned labels have a lighter cognitive workload for users: Alignment of ...


14

Apple iPhone & iPad (iOS) User Experience Guidelines iPhone & iPad (iOS) User Interface Guidelines Mac OS X User Experience Guidelines Mac OS X User Interface Guidelines Google Android User Interface Guidelines Design Principles Google TV Web Site Optimization Resources Website Design & Content Guidelines BlackBerry Blackberry Browser ...


11

Right-aligned, definitely. You can see this as a function of the Gestalt Grouping Principles: objects that are close together will be visually parsed together and interpreted as belonging together. Obviously, this is useful so people can read smoothly from label to text field. Therefore, by right-aligning the labels next to their corresponding text-fields, ...


11

The ribbon was designed for programs with a lot of commands, CRUD application tend to have just a few commands so maybe the ribbon is not the right UI to begin with. You can do what MS did when they designed the ribbon, take as many people as you can (that know the field, preferably customers) give then a list of tabs/groups and a few command and let them ...


10

A couple of thoughts come to mind: I wouldn’t worry too much about consistency with the legacy forms especially if you’re rolling out the new forms in a short period of time. Soon those old forms will be a dim memory, neither a help nor a hindrance to the new design’s performance. It’s not so bad if different forms look different if those differences in ...


9

Sometimes I'll position my labels immediately above or sometimes immediately to the left of form elements. It simply depends on space constraints of the page I'm working with. But once I make my decision I'm consistent it with it. There are a couple guidelines I follow for each case: If you place the label above the textbox, make sure you provide ...


9

According to the Wikipedia page on Gestalt psychology, Christian von Ehrenfels introduced the concept in his work Über Gestaltqualitäten (On the Qualities of Form, 1890). That appears to be the original published work on Gestalt as a concept in psychology. It might be worth following the Gestalt psychology topic on Quora to see if some interesting ...


8

There are no hard, universal rules for designing any particular class of software. The design of your application will vary radically depending on the most likely use-cases for it, and the kind of tasks you imagine it being used for. If, for example, you imagine your user creating lots of small scripts from scratch (perhaps to manage automated tests, for ...


7

Firstly, it's a given that whatever you do, you need to test it with your users. Whatever we suggest is taken to be a good first start. That said, I think that YouTube's design is not very good. As you rightly point out, people usually click on the up or down vote icons near the counter - which is to be expected. The counter indicates the current voting, ...


6

Whilst they do have their uses, I don't really like UIAlertView: They all look exactly the same. There's no easy way to distinguish between a 'just letting you know' message and 'this will delete all the things' message in a quick instant. It usually ends up with the user always pressing OK or similar to get back to what they were doing. Customising the ...


5

Yes, you can create nearly identical GUI across multiple platforms. Most operating systems mandate only the status bar to be visible at all times (some, like Symbian and Blackberry, even allow 100% full-screen mode). The only differences would be in the look of controls, which are often under the control of the OS (e.g. drop-down lists). Although anything ...


5

Consistent behavior, adequate appearance IMO you need to clarify (for us, or maybe for yourself) what needs to be consistent, and what not. Consistent behavior means: Things that look the same should behave the same. Adequate appearance means: the look helps the user predict the functionality. With these ad-hoc definitions by humble me, they are not ...


4

I would start by reading The Universal Principles of Design a indispensable book in my opinion. There is also some science to what we find pleasing but there is probably plenty of work to be done in that field. Check out Keith Langs video The Science of Aesthetics.


4

I would imagine that most introductory psychology texts would touch on the gestalt principles. Two useful books that I have that cover them quite well are: Visual Thinking for Design by Colin Ware Information Dashboard Design by Stephen Few The first focuses more on underlying principles of visual perception, the second is much more applied. Both have a ...


4

I recently carried out an extensive usability study into the design of web forms and these were my key conclusions: The best alignment is around a central axis (i.e. right-aligned labels and left-aligned fields). A different alignment can work just as well if field highlighting is used (a coloured outline or highlight over the field currently being used). ...


4

I didn't recognize the statement but I propose you direction. In gamification field there are personality types which refers to the psychological classification of different types of individuals. They are: Achievers, Explorers, Socializers and Killers. This classification is useful not only for gamification but could be spreaded more widely. At least ...


4

I've read about this a few months back, but can't recall where, so doing this off the top of my head. It goes: To begin with, systems should not rely on hover effect to denote a clickable item. In this age of touchscreens, the presentation should make it clear what is clickable and what's not. Then, it is recommended to change the cursor upon hover, ...


3

Interesting question. The first option which I would prefer would be to combine step 2 and step three such so that that users can directly add information there. A example of that would be the online insurance form which might have only five steps in the navigation pane but might require you to fill in additional details if you added information such as ...


3

The second one is extremely disorienting. As as US citizen I am much more keen understanding dates from left to right. (Like in your first mock) The reason is that most people view time linearly. And viewing calendars conditions one to think about time and planning time in that same fashion. Go for the first option.


3

There are some papers from early researchers on Gestalt theory at Classics in the History of Psychology. Especially the Wertheimer paper is quite an easy read (was already translated from German in '38) and contains a couple of nice informative pictures.


3

Gestalt Laws are most often referenced as a basis for what we know about how humans visually perceive the organization of things, or perceptual proximity. Some known ways that perceptual proximity can be achieved are, Spatial proximity - things closer together will be perceived as a group. Similarity - things that are similar in size, shape, or color are ...


3

I'm in almost the same situation that you are with my application and designing a "Ribbon" interface. I've contemplated a situation where I group commands in the ribbon based upon the core "business" object. In other words, if my app allowed users to manage Clients and Vendors would it make sense to have a ribbon group dedicated to Clients, with all of the ...


3

As far as I'm concerned, Kristina Halvorson is the current thought leader in this area. She works at Brain Traffic. Their blog has a lot of good content, such as this article about maintaining non-text content. She also wrote a book, aptly titled Content Strategy for the Web, and an article outlining several key aspects of content strategy for A List Apart: ...


3

Universal design tries to plan and manufacture products (environments, buildings, furniture, etc.) that can be used by everybody, regardless of their age, gender or possible disabilities. Usually UD is used in context of physical objects, not software. User-centered design is a user interface design method that focuses the needs, goals and limitations of ...


3

Historically, Apple (or rather, Jobs) has pushed the company towards selling user experience as a whole, rather than piecemeal as separate hardware and software. This has been especially true over the past decade or so where Jobs gave Jonathan Ive considerable power within the company to push their industrial design forward. It's not always been a perfect ...


3

I think that it's not necessarily very constructive to frame things in the context of "whose fault it is". No product team will ever get a product 100% perfect on the first try, that's why you test and iterate. Also, although the experience of the user is often of critical importance, if you left some things up to the user the company probably would go ...


3

Although I do the same, extolling that "there is no such thing as human error", that is simply not true. How "error" is defined and how it is put into context of the overall system is very important though. When most people hear "human error" they do not see the details, the see the person who is completely to blame. Donald Norman's The Design of Everyday ...


2

I've been thinking about this too, and the main idea I've come up with is similar to what Tim Lentine described: having a tab for each of my main business objects. I'd put the most commonly performed commands for that object in the tab for it, for example and "Order" object might have a commands to change status (eg cancel, ship, etc), bill, send invoice, ...


2

Another good Alan Cooper book is "The Inmates are running the Asylum" - this is good for understanding why so many user experiences suck. If you read it thoughtfully, you'll start thinking about UX in new ways.


2

My concern with either design is the ability to cope with multiple nightlife companies hosting multiple events on the same dates - AND - the possible sparseness of events of a nightlife company that only caters at weekends for example. See for example the Ministry of Sound website which has a sliding view which neither squeezes information nor leaves empty ...



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