New answers tagged

2

Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap


0

An idea: With so many potential variables, a nice feature might be to provide "templates" for the most commonly needed rules so a user doesn't always have to start from scratch. How much of the work can you do for them ahead of time? The user could modify, duplicate these preexisting samples to more easily customize a rule to do just what they wanted. ...


1

I don't believe there is a specific design pattern for your exact example. But you want to combine a Tunnel with the Wizard. You might also consider the Good Defaults pattern if you feel there is need to influence the decision of the user.


0

Comparing two things across 2 browser tabs is not very efficient because the user needs to rely on memory as they switch between the two tabs. The most efficient and effective method to compare 2 things, is to compare them side-by-side on the same page because the user does not need to rely on memory - they can see the differences on one page. Another ...


2

Guidelines are just that: guidelines. They guide the development of your application, they do not make all of the decisions about your application. They document the best thinking about design at the time that the guidelines were written. They help you make a better application by focusing your time and attention on the decisions that matter to your ...


-6

Design guidelines make it easier and faster for developers to help them fill their app stores. However, most of the best accepted, understood and enjoyed apps have little regard for the UI/UX Guidelines from the manufacturers. Those that consider their users, the market and the existing ideas and accepted paradigms of input, and then optimise and explore ...


0

I think there's a bit of context lost in your captures, but strictly basing on them, the answer is easy: in the old version, the byline could either belong to the photo above or what appears to be an ad, so it's totally out of place. Also, those giant social media buttons on top of an ad are really confusing, they're grabbing attention to something else on ...


0

the aim should be to help to user focus on the content or features on the website, not distract them. the background should take a very low priority in the user cognitive load, like the name "background"


8

I'll just quickly point out three points: It'll look less clean. I mean this both figuratively and literally. Anytime you add more visual information to something it becomes more cluttered. This is why with very data-dense interfaces people often choose for flat design; it alleviates the business a bit. Secondly, some patterns can actually make it look as ...


3

You're probably not going to find data on this, because it's not the kind of things that publishable studies are usually focused on. If you're really lucky, some hyper-productive UXer will have turned some test data into blog post, but even then, the sample size will probably be small. This is a case where you have to make decisions based on the ...


0

I think there's something wrong with your premise: It seems that the popularity of iOS (as opposed to say Windows or MacOS) proves otherwise, everything is an app. You seem to be saying "Apple mobile devices are more popular than Windows or OSX desktop devices, which proves that app-centric mental models are more intuitive than content-centric mental ...


1

Trust is relative Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a ...


1

If you are using d3.js,then you can probably create a matrix layout and plot your subject on one of its axis and let the other axis represent its objects,create color codes for each cell that would tell you about the various states of each object associated with the same object.After plotting it would look something similar : Based on color codes you can ...


1

I know what you are talking about because we've been facing similar problems adopting our brand to match material design. Our band is minimalistic and only uses 2 colors(just black and white), so google's emphasis on colors for animation and transitions in material design doesn't exactly work across brands like ours. The Oculus example you provided reminds ...


0

It's odd to me that people get hung up on this. Material is a UI framework, not a brand guideline. But apparently it's a common point of confusion because ... Google created case studies to address this question The Google Design team put together a reference doc appropriately called "Expressing Brand in Material". Material design lays the foundation ...


2

Buttons should say what they do, or actionable links in your case. "Conditions" doesn't mean squat. "Show Conditions" tells me exactly what action I'm about to take. Would most users figure out "Conditions"? Probably. Would more users figure out "Show/Hide Conditions"? Yes. Should you hide important legal information? No. But that's a different question.



Top 50 recent answers are included