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1

The one place that I have seen this approach was in an tablet application designed for shop staff to place orders on behalf of a customer. In that context, the order details including a list of items added and the total value was given prominence and displayed all the time. The sales assistant could then browse/search for products through a panel that opened ...


0

The primary usability aspect I see here is returning to the previous location. While technically it does not make a difference, a popup communicates this to the user: "Once we are done with this little hassle, you will fall back to where you were before". I would also expect a popup to indicate "this will be over quickly". The first doesn't matter for ...


0

This varies from website to website based on the amount of data you want to capture on registration form, among other factors. Sites like reddit offer a quick popup window to capture data which is just a username and password, but sites like Paypal which might have drawn out registration process comprising of various steps, credit card information etc will ...


1

I am taking the liberty of assuming column text is something related / in context to the content on the page. This brings to mind many news websites and how they handle content. Here are a couple of websites. New York Times and NDTV respectively. They provide a clean header area for title. It gives central attention to the primary content on the page. ...


2

Depends on the relation between the title and the columns, I'd say. If your title also covers the second column, then the visual hierarchy should reflect that, i.e., you should follow (2). If the title is not related to the second column, approach (1) is right. As an example, if the title says "Search Results for XYZ", and the second column contains ...


1

I don't think this is an area where UX design patterns are going to be helpful, because this isn't a well defined enough user flow that a reasonable pattern can emerge. That said, if I were designing this app and looking for helpful examples, I would assemble a taxonomy of something like the following sites: Banking and payment sites which offer ...


0

I posted this on another question, but I'll include it here as well: I'm working on an implementation of a webpage that needs to feel like a flexible web app. There are multiple forms that the user can fill out. For my purposes and users, here some assumptions (agreed on by stakeholders & SMEs, but may be overturned in user testing): Users coming to ...


84

Don't start with choosing colors! 1. First, distinguish notifications from errors This is a common point of confusion with UX. Consider these two messages: Sorry, the app has crashed - This is an error, and should be highlighted as an error (i.e. pop up alert, dialog, red button, etc). You have rejected a date with Kate Upton - Although this sounds ...


6

Already there are couple of good answers urging you from moving away from colors. I do agree with them. Considering the color blindness/cultural relations, colors should always be used as a secondary mode of conveying any information. But then again, if you are working with an application which already has alerts for success, failure which are using color ...


8

The message indicates a successful action, so if you're using color cues, this message should use the color of success: green, in your case. The danger color (red, in this example) should be used when the user is about to do something destructive (e.g. "Are you sure you want to delete this?"), but the message you're asking about is for when the user has ...


44

I would recommend moving away from colour for confirmation messages in this case. I say this because it can be confusing for the user especially since you are using red and green for "Reject" and "Accept" so when they have successfully done an action moving from red to green can be disorientating and unworthy extra cognitive overflow. Take a look at ...


21

I find that the grey background with white text gives a very neutral feel and looks good on the eye as well. Unless it's good or bad, I would avoid green or red.


2

Don't cross the streams! Changing color schemes is different from outright reversal of the palette. For heat maps, color carries the principal information so reversing the color axis isn't a great idea unless you don't mind putting up with some customer confusion. If you want to migrate to a dark-light strategy you may want to evolve customers through ...


-2

It's called a parallax design. Search online for "define parallax website" and you'll get a number of examples and definitions. FWIW I was banging my head, trying to remember this word, found this question but no one (yet) had the answer. Mercifully, the word then popped in my head: parallax.


0

Answer seems to be highly dependant on the layout chosen, as per the sketch. Rather than add sticky headers to an existing design, you may want to redesign layout to support them. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

Using a reasonable fixed table height would be better than floating sticky headers (too distracting)


1

Put a "Skip Navigation"or "Skip to main content" Links first element before every thing on top of your pages. So the keyboard user will decide to let screen reader go through all navigation and other stuff or just skip to go to the main content. so you can use visuallyhideen class to make the link invisible for sighted people. ...


1

This is a very common pattern in enterprise apps. You have different role- or policy- driven views into a common application and model. You can either use separate layouts, or the same layout. Both can be successful. For these user interfaces, templating and widget re-use is very important, because you can assemble layouts very quickly by dropping in ...


0

From comments, I understand that you need to offer two variants of a product. I'll look into this aspect, and how it could be supported: The variants are very similar, but differ in price substantially. They are so similar, that, in direct comparison, there is not much reason to pay the higher price. But you still assume that you can sell both variants. ...


0

Firstly, toggle buttons are somewhat problematic. Although they are a pretty common design pattern on modern touchscreen devices it isn't immediately obvious that one can activate them just by clicking. A user unfamiliar with this on-screen element but familiar with it's real life counterpart is going to try and drag it as we don't click such switches in the ...


0

Design priorities can help here. I think a priority here is, let's use the best control for the job. Checkboxes (without labels) are good for on/off states where it's clear what the check/uncheck states mean. Labeled toggle switches give you an opportunity to show what each state means ('on' and 'off'). I'm guessing the best control for your situation ...


10

This is a bug with the Google UI, and not intentional. You were right to notice the distinction, but it shouldn't be used as any kind of example of good design. As of now (March 2015), Google is in the middle of a long process of migrating its apps and platforms to Material Design, and it will take a while before most apps are compliant. Material Design ...


2

Technically, the upper and the lower part belong to two different software products. The upper one implements the UI to the user account, and handles the navigation. The lower part belongs to the current application. I assume they where created at different times. Between these, there was a change in the style guide used, regarding how to style tooltips. ...


0

I would go with the native tooltip if possible (if you're not trying to do a fancy tooltip with icons or colors). This will be most familiar to users and you don't have to worry as much about accessibility, etc. in the way you do when you use a custom solution.


6

I'm pretty sure it's because Drive is developped by another team than the team who's working on the Google account canvas. More a question of schedule/production rather than UX/UI thought I guess.


1

I don't have an authoritative answer BUT the two tool tips refer to different environments and Google's designers might have wanted to differentiate between them. The first, "plain," tooltip is for Google's main navigation section. The second, "styled," tooltip is for the individual app within the broader Google environment.


1

Your question is one that Intuit has put a lot of time and effort into putting into practice with its TurboTax UI, where parent activities are done first, and child forms take care of the rest. The entire procedure of necessary work has been (as far as I can tell without being involved in its design) ordered from parent-to-child. As you may realize, children ...


0

why don't you just use check-boxes for deleting and arrows for actions, similar to this -> keep is as clean as possible and it does not take much space



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