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Seriously – are you asking for a site review here? Well – here's my two cents: the site looks like somebody took a standard theme and put minimum effort in editing it. there is almost no 'real' content – that makes 'reviewing' your site even more difficult. I would suggest you spend some time working on your site! Then, if you have a specific question ...


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A key strength of Material design is that it is defined from abstract principles downwards. While specification does include definition of components, it is (a) not prescriptive, and most importantly (b) there is enough mid-level and high-level guidance that a designer can create a new component that fits in with the other Material design components. ...


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Provided the control can be styled and made to behave within the guidelines of material style and consistent behaviour, I'd say use it. I get the impression that the Material Design guidelines are largely concerned with how an app appears and behaves, and doesn't necessarily prescribe a narrow list of controls you can choose from. In cases where you want ...


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On Windows, Ctrl is primarily used for shortcuts to menu commands. Alt is used for access keys in menus and dialogs. While these are sometimes considered as shortcuts, Microsoft sees this more as an accessibility feature. Windows Key is used for system-wide functions. Function keys can also be used for shortcuts, and there are a few standard Function keys ...


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Windows is more focused on controling the bar, and shortcuts from the start menu : Win + number will make you come back to this task Win + E will make the Explorer file open you can access clicking on Start then on Computer Even if you can open task manager from right clicking on the windows bar, it's not the very first design. Since Alt controls ...


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There are a couple of things to bear in mind here. Keyboard shortcuts under Windows are often based on much older MSDOS commands and so don't always follow modern conventions. And, for shortcuts within programs, they are defined by the developer and tailored to the perceived needs of their user and so do not always follow existing paradigms (plus there are ...


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Take one step deeper. How should you display the questions? One step deeper. Why are users playing your game in the first part? If they want to learn something, they should repeat. If they want to be entertained they should repeat only if getting a repeated question allows them to feel confident or gain an extra advantage as this will enable a ...


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I believe it would be worthwhile to create your own random algorithm instead of relying on computer generated randomness. Purposely omitting previous results could increase the perceived randomness of the system. Here's a great article which details this issues with iPod shuffle. It basically says our brain looks for patterns in things - Some argue that ...


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350 is not very many questions. Why don't you just shuffle the list when the user starts the game and avoid duplicates altogether? This takes very little processing power (even a crappy mobile phone can do the operation in milliseconds) and minimal memory (store pointers or indexes to questions and not the question itself....the order can be stored in ...


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If your users are going to be able to answer the questions quickly, example: Which of the following is an Impressionist painter? (da Vinci, Rembrandt, Monet, Picasso) and they are going to quickly go to another problem then they will get duplicate questions very quickly. If they are using this trivia game in order to help learn a school subject they would ...


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The examples you give are all achievable using first order set logic without the need for nested operations. They can be described using a form with 3 simple fields: Using this interface, the set operations you describe can be created as follows (click image to expand): If you also need nested operations, this is also doable...leave a comment and I ...


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I can't really see the difference between this and a boolean rule/query builder, e.g. like the one described here. Let's use cars and look at your examples: Include red trucks. Include red cars and trucks as long as they're of Chevrolet make. Include red Chevrolets and Chevrolet trucks, but exclude vintage cars. download bmml source – ...


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When people discuss haptic feedback (in relation to smart watches) like it's a new thing they are mainly talking about the feedback when people are actively touching the surface of the screen i.e when performing actions. In this instance I can't imagine there is a use to provide feedback whilst touching the screen that you have a message as if you are ...


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There are two common patterns for clearing: explicit clearing, through a button, such as the included button you provided in your captures, or through a stand-alone button for the whole form. This latter solution tends to be a bad practice as users may press it instead of the submit button, and there are few use cases which require a clear form button. ...


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Clear buttons are normally provided when the field is being used affect a default view and the user is likely to want to return to that default. For example, to filter the list of all products in a catalogue and then to return to the unfiltered list. It's easier and more intuitive to click an explicit 'clear' button than it is to highlight the contents, ...


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The one place that I have seen this approach was in an tablet application designed for shop staff to place orders on behalf of a customer. In that context, the order details including a list of items added and the total value was given prominence and displayed all the time. The sales assistant could then browse/search for products through a panel that opened ...


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The primary usability aspect I see here is returning to the previous location. While technically it does not make a difference, a popup communicates this to the user: "Once we are done with this little hassle, you will fall back to where you were before". I would also expect a popup to indicate "this will be over quickly". The first doesn't matter for ...


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This varies from website to website based on the amount of data you want to capture on registration form, among other factors. Sites like reddit offer a quick popup window to capture data which is just a username and password, but sites like Paypal which might have drawn out registration process comprising of various steps, credit card information etc will ...


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I am taking the liberty of assuming column text is something related / in context to the content on the page. This brings to mind many news websites and how they handle content. Here are a couple of websites. New York Times and NDTV respectively. They provide a clean header area for title. It gives central attention to the primary content on the page. ...


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Depends on the relation between the title and the columns, I'd say. If your title also covers the second column, then the visual hierarchy should reflect that, i.e., you should follow (2). If the title is not related to the second column, approach (1) is right. As an example, if the title says "Search Results for XYZ", and the second column contains ...


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I don't think this is an area where UX design patterns are going to be helpful, because this isn't a well defined enough user flow that a reasonable pattern can emerge. That said, if I were designing this app and looking for helpful examples, I would assemble a taxonomy of something like the following sites: Banking and payment sites which offer ...


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I posted this on another question, but I'll include it here as well: I'm working on an implementation of a webpage that needs to feel like a flexible web app. There are multiple forms that the user can fill out. For my purposes and users, here some assumptions (agreed on by stakeholders & SMEs, but may be overturned in user testing): Users coming to ...



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