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I assumed "the golden ratio" stuff was true for a long time for webdesign. But now I actually found the whole golden ratio stuff is utterly nonsense , see: http://vimeo.com/88132964 NO: architects, painters etc... did NOT use the golden ratio in their works, never, NOT: NOT it is not from the "antiquity", not the egyptians, nor greeks and the Da Vinci stuff ...


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I would recommend the icon-with-caption option. Your visual treatment of the captions is sound, so don't worry that it "doesn't look good." A big reason why I suggest this is there are not instantly recognizable icons that mean "syllabus", "quiz", and "feedback", etc. So you will never be able to communicate those features with a bare icon. Moreover, the ...


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To pull in the content of that related question, this is basically a re-discovery of application toolbars that were so popular in the 90's. A Microsoft study/paper found that once the user was familiar with the UI, text was useful as an additional visual marker, to help distinguish the shapes of the buttons. So, a horizontal toolbar with labels to the side ...


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I think the size of the UX changes should reflect their scope. If the developer option is something like "now you can change the background color!", then the "normal way" is totally fine, as it's not a big change. Option 1 makes sense if the "Developer's area" is totally separate from "Profile options", and has a similarly scope for changes. This seems ...


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This article showed up the day before yesterday and I think it could be to your liking. Summary: The guys at Zeebox, a social network for TV, used a side menu with hamburger style menu in their new design around a year ago. People loved the new design, but user engagement was down. Time on site was almost halved. They changed it back and six months later ...


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As JonW said; i think you trying to ask if it's a good idea to put it in the upper left and I think not. There are ergonomic issues with placing things there (see picture below). A swipe from left to right could work however and is a common pattern (though you should still inform the user about the whereabouts of the navigation). Placing a commonly used ...


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Just to understand the problem better. Curriculum 1 > level 1 > subject 1 > $xx and Curriculum 1 > level 1 > subject 2 > $yy are the types of price variations that you are providing. So from your proposed suggestion screen 3 shows the total amount for all the possible combinations (of curriculum - level - subject) from the selections made (since you have ...


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I think what you have isn't bad, however I would make a few small tweaks. I would look at introducing headings to help the user. Maybe seeing it in the context of the website would help, but to me, I find it difficult to tell what each field relates to. You could also include a progress/stepped approach here by adding a number or icon to say '1. Choose ...


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My only feedback would be the fact that it's displaying all the content at once. It looks like quite a lot to take in at the start. There could be some indication of 'steps', showing three different screens, only revealing the next piece of information after the last has been selected. This makes sense given that the next field requires the previous to be ...


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Here are a few ways you can hint at this functionality: Provide an alternative method for zooming in and out via buttons - it looks like flotchart provides this functionality. By seeing the zoom in and zoom out buttons, users may simply try to pinch because that functionality is commonly associated with zooming. Same idea as above, provide an alternative ...


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Well, the "best" way will depend on your needs and the overall style of the dashboard (what are users used to see - are there more similar visualizations?), but generally speaking, you can: Flip the semantics, i.e. worse rankings will result in a smaller slice. Simply use a meter bar instead of a donut.


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First off: no, I don't think there's any definitive research, because what you should do is dependent on the context of your design. Who are your users? What are you asking them to do in a modal overlay? Is it compelling to them or merely an interruption? Modal overlays are an extremely disruptive design pattern. Abuse of these is rampant, especially when ...


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It's important that it is somewhere relatively easy to see and I think you have to think of what a user is looking for - flags can be very 90's but they work because they act as a good signifier, so I wouldn't discount them if designed correctly. I also agree with Franchesa RE that Dutch site. The Seek website has a variation on the idea - although it's ...


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If the choice is only ever between native language and english, and you want to maintain a professional look, you can't go too wrong imitating how this banking website does it. It's clean, flagless, and easy to find. The top right hand corner seems to be pretty standard position for language toggles.


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The design is a rather eccentric amalgamation of design approaches. The idea that delivery of the content is somewhat similar to how Quartz does it. The site’s navigation is seem to be centered around the ever-present scrolling selection of stories in a left hand site on larger desktop screens or an expandable menu with a tap on smaller mobile screen. Like ...


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It's a 'hamburger menu'. It's not new, but not typically done on the desktop. It is a carry-over from the mobile world, where taking up initial screen real estate with a large menu was not desired, hence hiding it behind a menu icon. It's given that name due to the icon looking like a hamburger. I also like the term as it hearkens back to the concept of ...


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That is a subject that has being discussed many times and the answer depends on your perspective. The most common consensus is to open anything that is not your website in a new tab or window. If you want to read about the reasons for that, or the opposite option, you can check the answer I wrote on the question When (if ever) should links be opened in a ...


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I made myself the same question a while ago while developing an android app which allowed the user some CRUD functions. What I decided finally based on user feedback was to use "save" when creating a new item and "update" when editing an existing one. However personally, I wouldn't mind. There should be other cues in the UI that indicate if I am creating or ...


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It sounds like you are looking for a word that works in the instance where you are queuing the actions locally and then cumulatively applying them to a database when a button is clicked. If that is correct, I would use Submit Changes or Apply Changes, as programmatically speaking, that is the wording used in most entity frameworks and it covers all changes ...


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On the team here am working especially building Help section for applications. I would see Update and Save are make difference on buttons. If we are going to collect the data from the user, we can use text on button as "Save" and if you are doing some action on existing data, then that should be "Update"


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On the team I'm on, here's our thoughts: Update and Save are largely interchangeable. The only difference is, Save typically implies a page-change event, whereas Update usually implies that changes will be applied to what you can see, immediately (technologically speaking, usually accompanies an AJAX operation.) For instance, an app my team is working on ...


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From a user (non-programmer's) perspective. There's a difference between creating something and editing (updating) something. It's probably better to show this difference in button labels. This may be a stylistic thing, but if there's room for a longer label, I tend to use "Create Item" as oppose to "Create" so the action is crystal clear. This also makes ...



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