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6

I have always heard them called "splash screens" (especially on mobile). I think the traditional splash screen doesn't include the down arrow but this site includes many examples that include them. http://line25.com/articles/web-design-trend-showcase-splash-screen-revival Modern examples of splash screens are built right into the main page, filling the ...


13

There's no official pattern name for it but the NN/g termed it as "False Floors". They've written an article on it and have discussed how this practice leads to bad UX as it does not naturally encourage the users to scroll. Good designs shouldn't need an arrow to tell users to scroll. To quote from the article: When pages of any size offer little content ...


0

The idea that we might refer to as "pop-up" or "context-sensitive" help today seemed to pre-date "coach marks" by about seven years: Methods of displaying help information nearest to an operation point at which the help information is requested So, it seems that an Apple Patent (referring to Coach Marks) was enabled by an (at the time) seven year old IBM ...


0

Should we be considering taking interface cues from the physical world instead of older generations of computers? I think this question is setting up a false premise that it's one or the other. I'd argue it's likely neither. The best practice these day is to consider 'mobile first' to accommodate the very real fact that more and more people are using ...


0

You're asking when it's OK to hide certain controls. I came across one useful answer to this question is in the book, Designing from both sides of the screen, by Ellen Isaacs and Alen Walendowski. This book talks about frequency and commonality as a way to assess whether a feature needs to be built, and also how prominent the feature should be in the user ...


1

Bulk edit is a power tool. Affordance, although discoverability might be a more relevant term here, isn't a big issue because this is not the only way to delete or edit items. You can always drill down into a specific item to manage it. So while you do have to "learn" it the first time around. Once you have, it's not a big deal. Also remember an interface ...


-1

I would like to see checkbox where i can select multiple items (fruits). Everyone loves fruits and they might love more than 1 or 2 fruits. So, I prefer checkbox. Radio buttons are used to get a single answer rather than multiple (Like yes/no, close ended questions). Hope this helps :)


4

I can't answer your direct question as to whether or not mixing radios and checkboxes in one list has any conclusive testing data. But I will say it's not something I've seen. I'd suggest considering some alternatives. Visually separate the 'none of the above' checkbox from the rest Select the fruit you like: [ ] apples [ ] bananas [ ] oranges ...


0

Another option to consider is Infield Top Aligned Labels. Most websites today either use top aligned or infield form labels because they aren’t aware of a better way. http://uxmovement.com/forms/why-infield-top-aligned-form-labels-are-quickest-to-scan/


0

"A" (the drag and drop option) is probably the natural choice on a tablet with touch interface. Unless that arrangement is impractical for screen space reasons, it will probably be more pleasing for the users. (who are, presumably, using a tablet at least in part for that kind of experience)


0

The UI you have presented is not consistent either. It has visual consistency. But the interaction is not consistent. When a user adds a form, it is added below the dropdown, but when a new field is added, it is done above it. This affects consistency as well. The user has to get used to one of this pattern (either adding above or below). Otherwise, it ...


0

Consistency + heirarchy = mo betta There's nothing wrong with consistency among controls. I think the problem you're sensing is hierarchy. In your example, adding a field (the low-level item) is more prominent than added a form (the high-level item). The controls are identical, but the ground contrast is greater within the form edit module. With a few ...


0

The ideal answer is "test both" and see which works better for your users. Without testing, if you have to make a choice, clarity always trumps consistency. Focusing on your specific answer, I would suggest a different UX pattern for adding fields to make it even more different than adding a form. For example, eliminating the dropdown completely, and ...


1

https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/UIKitUICatalog/UIDatePicker.html http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/controls/pickers.html They are just called date pickers in iOS guidelines. Android generally terms them Pickers for both date and time. These are just customizations of already existing ...


1

It's known as picker or spinner. First example looks like a custom designed one, but it can be done with this tutorial, your second example is the native iOS6 picker (now it has changed to a flat look)



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