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It may be a pager control Do the circles also act as links that display a different image? If so, the set of circles could be called a pager control. The fact that they have circles rather than numbers doesn't really change their navigation function.


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You mean what those circles are called or what the whole page element is called? The element is called (image) carousel, circles are probably just circles or dots.


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If you wan't to have a selector with 3 states I wouldn't use a toggle, a toggle button is good if there is only two states (or two plus a default like I tried to show in comments) but if you want to introduce a third state there becomes issues such as which state to switch to on click, and how to properly show what each state represents. The slider: ...


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Adding tab inside the modal will solve the issue to some extent. If the content is more then break it into sections and distribute to the tabs based on the requirement. Try to use simple tabs.


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I like tags, which seems to be the most accepted term, but I've also heard it referred to as filtered search.


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Search Token/Tags could be a good general name. But Google came with another one in its Material Design Components: Chips


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I think they have been adopted from "Search Tokens" on OS X. A unit that functions as a special, adjustable search term. Tokens are great because they make searching less error-prone and easier to manipulate. The functionality is different as search tokens refine search to a specific field. However, it looks similar as far as UI is concerned. ...


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Its called as Tagging. Similar to this feature is a available in Mac OS (tagging while saving the files, it helps in searching/indexing files). Many site uses this features as you mentioned. If you follow the patterns in the google, facebook or mac os, you will get the better idea about the tagging guidelines.


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It's usually referred to as 'Multi-select autocomplete' in my experience. I haven't seen any guidelines previously (or from searching now) but this demo and code link might help you in some way jQuery Tokeninput.


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That reminds me of the keyword tagging system from Evernote, at a guess the keywords willl filter your results based upon already defined 'tags'.


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Less is more. The colors and circles add clutter, but don't add meaning to the values. You will also need labels to make it clear what each value is. I recommend against color-coding them as you will have to make an effect to avoid inconveniencing colorblind reader, and having to consult a legend to make sure you are looking at the number you think you are ...


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I think the reason the listboxes solution doesn't work is because its actions imply the objects are being moved from containers to groups (or vice versa) which isn't the case. Eg., when you assign an object from container1 to group2, it doesn't actually get removed from the container. If I understand correctly, the items in each container can be managed ...


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The advantage of copy/paste, as I see it, is that I've been trained to type cmd-C cmd-V to make a copy of something. The only way Clone would be more efficient than that would be if it had its own keyboard shortcut and if I memorized it.


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Copy and paste were originally intended to act between two containers (folder A, folder B). Clone, on the other hand, is within-container. Copy and paste are two actions, clone is one action. So if the user intention is to clone, why make this a two-action process when you can do with one? Then: Automatically duplication an object in a list ...


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The closest to a UX design language I've come across is the Generic Modeling Environment research from ISIS research center at Vanderbilt University. They explore how custom, domain specific languages can be constructed that then allow for systems to be modeled from multiple perspectives. Over the past year or so they've begun porting GME to the web and it's ...


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It is not something that I have seen. One thing to keep in mind is that if you implement an uncommon feature on your site then you're asking users to learn a new mechanic and are increasing their cognitive load (perhaps unnecessarily). If it's only 2 categories, why not just have them both expanded from the start? If there were numerous categories I could ...


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In the scenario you are proposing (drag and drop items from a long list), several factors must be taken into account. Every factor might present potential hurdles to the user. On screen real estate: is the target easy to reach? Check Fitt's Law. List item size. Unwanted scrolling: when reaching the bottom of the screen, the screen will start scrolling ...


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A quick example of one of the possible problems - Suppose, you have a long list or say a visual from editor where all the sections are not being covered on the screen on current resolution of the system, then it will be difficult for the users to select a particular section and reorder them. Specially, when one will realize or need to scroll the mouse along ...


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I agree with the points stated by @JonBee, but I think the main difference lies in the options (content) we are showing to the users, and the purpose of an App or a PC. Usually, we give our mobile users content to consume as soon as they get into our app, so they don't have to wonder what to do... they just start consuming what's on the screen -plus, they ...


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One of the critical piece that made the Start button work was a sustained, ubiquitous, multi-million dollar ad campaign. It would be hard to understate the effect of this on users' ability to understand the Start button.


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While there are quite a few similarities between the Start menu used in Windows and a hamburger menu, I'd say there are a few key differences in their execution. Amount of Content One of the biggest arguments against hamburger menus is the amount of navigation friction they introduce. Usually these menus contain a small number of buttons or functions that ...


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I've been wondering about the explanation, as the end-result is "i want to emulate a certain amount of certain entities", everything else (server list, ip-addresses, ...) seems clutter... my suggestion would be a list of entities and an amount, the backend should than take care that they are created in this pool of servers. Think about "what keeps me from ...


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As always, it depends, and to me it would depend on the target audience. Our western culture reads from left to right, eye trackers will also back this up, we start at the top left, and we end our "scan" at the bottom right. Those are the place where you'd put information like logos or other stuff you think is important. In some other countries, people read ...


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It all depends on what you're going for. In terms of straight usability the logo has to main purposes: It tells people which site they're on. Most people hit your site through search engines, so they'll be dropped somewhere on a random page of a random website. This is why the tagline, which explains what your site is, is below the logo. It functions as a ...


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You're fine putting it in the centre, as long as there's symmetry. Take for example my own website, it uses a centre logo mainly because 1: The logo is symmetrical 2: The navigation is 3: The style allows it. Most of the time it depends on how complex your navigation is and the complexity of your theme. Minimalism tends to favour centred logos, whereas ...


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Common use would put it in the top left in most cases - and it's generally a good idea to be consistent with expectations (UX heuristics) Practicality would keep it out of the centre, as if you align it to one side there is more room for login / common tools / marketing etc This heat map http://www.nngroup.com/articles/f-shaped-pattern-reading-web-content/ ...


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People expect the logo to be on the left, with other links on the same row just because that's how most sites are. Centering the logo will work too, if the page's overall layout is centered, and if... There's nothing else in the row with the logo or The centered logo is clearly the focus of that top row, among other elements.


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People read from left to right so I put it on the left. Except when they don't. Then I put it on the right. Except when it stands alone by itself, in which I case I might put it in the middle, though sometimes offset in all these cases, but, in all cases, I put it where the designer says to put it.


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Adding to ThaSaleni, you could separate the list into two parts. "Oscar Awards" at the top and "Oscar Nominees" below that, this way it would be easier to find what the awarded movies are.


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This is a pretty simple interface so I only see three options: Leave it as is Move the difficulty to a second screen that appears after the start button is clicked Put the difficulty under the settings menu you have on the footer. Not #2 First of all I want to say I would rule #2 out because there is no need to make the user select their difficulty ...


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I like the current layout. But I would probably ask the user to select the difficulty every time they press a start button


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I'd also recommend maybe check out how Chosen handle multi-select dropdowns. I think their solution is elegant especially because it allows you to easily remove one of the selection without having to open the dropdown again. In your solution you have to open the dropdown to un-tick something. Also, I think having checkboxes inside a select is sorta hectic ...


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I would consider moving from a dropdown box to a grid with all subjects. Seems like it'd save a fair few clicks.



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