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From comments, I understand that you need to offer two variants of a product. I'll look into this aspect, and how it could be supported: The variants are very similar, but differ in price substantially. They are so similar, that, in direct comparison, there is not much reason to pay the higher price. But you still assume that you can sell both variants. ...


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Firstly, toggle buttons are somewhat problematic. Although they are a pretty common design pattern on modern touchscreen devices it isn't immediately obvious that one can activate them just by clicking. A user unfamiliar with this on-screen element but familiar with it's real life counterpart is going to try and drag it as we don't click such switches in the ...


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Design priorities can help here. I think a priority here is, let's use the best control for the job. Checkboxes (without labels) are good for on/off states where it's clear what the check/uncheck states mean. Labeled toggle switches give you an opportunity to show what each state means ('on' and 'off'). I'm guessing the best control for your situation ...


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This is a bug with the Google UI, and not intentional. You were right to notice the distinction, but it shouldn't be used as any kind of example of good design. As of now (March 2015), Google is in the middle of a long process of migrating its apps and platforms to Material Design, and it will take a while before most apps are compliant. Material Design ...


2

Technically, the upper and the lower part belong to two different software products. The upper one implements the UI to the user account, and handles the navigation. The lower part belongs to the current application. I assume they where created at different times. Between these, there was a change in the style guide used, regarding how to style tooltips. ...


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I would go with the native tooltip if possible (if you're not trying to do a fancy tooltip with icons or colors). This will be most familiar to users and you don't have to worry as much about accessibility, etc. in the way you do when you use a custom solution.


6

I'm pretty sure it's because Drive is developped by another team than the team who's working on the Google account canvas. More a question of schedule/production rather than UX/UI thought I guess.


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I don't have an authoritative answer BUT the two tool tips refer to different environments and Google's designers might have wanted to differentiate between them. The first, "plain," tooltip is for Google's main navigation section. The second, "styled," tooltip is for the individual app within the broader Google environment.


1

Your question is one that Intuit has put a lot of time and effort into putting into practice with its TurboTax UI, where parent activities are done first, and child forms take care of the rest. The entire procedure of necessary work has been (as far as I can tell without being involved in its design) ordered from parent-to-child. As you may realize, children ...


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why don't you just use check-boxes for deleting and arrows for actions, similar to this -> keep is as clean as possible and it does not take much space


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On the one hand server name/ip is the ID of the server and on the other it looks like the most important property is the server status. Not a clear answer here I think but just note you can combine both attributes to a single column. This is usually done by putting the primary information on top and the secondary below it, with smaller font and lighter ...


1

Here's a rule of thumb on data tables. For people who read from left to right, you assign priority from left to right because that's how they read. (Note: it'll be reverse for right to left languages e.g. Arabic) Columns used for ID & scanning gets higher priority Because we read and scan information using the "F-pattern", you want the identifying ...


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This problem has many parallels with database administration interfaces, where there are often many columns and rows. Both php myadmin and navicat solve this conundrum simply by allowing the user to configure column order to suit their own particular use case. Your domain is similar, you have technically adept users; detailed and complex technical data; ...


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It depends on the weight you want each to have. The ones you put further to the left, the more likely and easily people will see them as we read left to right. In your particular case, I'd likely do status and then the server name because if a server is down I want the admin to immediately notice. I'd likely have it color coded as well, green or black for ...


1

Where should the delete option be? I see many examples placing the delete icon or text on the far-right of the row. Is this best practice? Is it always advisable to swap row delete to checkbox selection/batch delete? I believe the far right location is because you don't want user to accidentally click on delete. It depends. For a really long (tall) ...


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You can simple use "actions" button which opens on click all available action for specific row. Example:


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Great question! This is a very common design pattern and it's one that sites screw up all the time (IMO!). Usually the objective is: Ensure the user sees the notification. Allow the user to get on with using the site smoothly after that. Don't p*ss off your users. This seems simple, but implementations often break the objectives! For example: Model ...


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As DA01 suggests, Apple and Amazon have probably done most of the research for you. "Be the first to review this!" adds a little cachet that is likely to appeal to some users. If your users are also signed in with a social network to the level where you can monitor their connections you might also be able to use "Be the first among your friends to review ...


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What you are describing is a very UX pattern, which is a policy editor. Generally, this entails selecting and editing a policy, and visualizing/editing the scope of the policy. Usually this results in an interface similar to what you sketched out, but with some adjustments: For the left hand column, it's unclear whether the checkboxes are controls or just ...


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I understand your problem. I started as the only UX guy in the team and every project was just a fight and argument. Sometimes it becomes difficult to convince them why some things are right and wrong. Dev team is happy with the optimal performance so they don't see any need in adding any extra efforts. There is no hard a fast rule for everything. Propose ...


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To me seems easier to understand if you group them more Authenticate: Nexus 5 with Android 5.0 iPhone 5s with iOS8 Nexus 6 with Android 6.0 If this are the only authentication options, it is obvious that if it's not in the list, it is not allowed (i.e. Android 4.0). But if needed you could add it as a footnote. Adding the disallowed as a footnote has ...


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It does sound like a tree. The most obvious form will probably look like the following (option 1): It can be optimized a bit (option 2): Or simplified (option 3): Does any of these options look suitable?


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Tabs indicate that there are different views of related information that can be swapped between at any time. Showing tabs and not allowing them to be used adds cognitive friction. I wouldn't show the tabs at all until after a selection is made on the first screen. Be sure to keep the first screen as simple as possible and only ask for the minimum amount ...



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