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This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...


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If you have a relationship / association with the other site you can frame them allowing your users to never "leave" your site (although in practice they do). * If you don't have an association with them then there isn't anything else you can do but write compelling copy explaining the benefits to the user for leaving and coming back. You can add incentives ...


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Perhaps Evernote could be a solution for you https://evernote.com/


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I've used tools like http://patternlab.io for that in the past. As you work through the site extract elements into the style guide. But it's a manual process, not automated.


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I thought this was a pretty good list. I liked how they gave multiple names when appropriate. http://designingwebinterfaces.com/essential_controls


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This Might Not Exist It may be the case that there isn't a canonical-enough reference to satisfy your particular needs. You'll likely end up with a list resources, each of which is strong in certain aspects, and weak in others. e.g. Microsoft's patterns are up-to-date and expansive, but are the delivered in the context of proprietary software. ...


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I don't know if there is a web resource that actually classifies GUI design patterns. We always refer them with the company they are developed in. You can use this site to see many of them at http://findguidelin.es/ Usability.gov's list http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/methods/user-interface-elements.html Input Controls: checkboxes, radio ...


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Taking into consideration that the "Photoshop" of the common man, MS Word, uses your first example then I would highly recommend just sticking with it. There will be a far smaller learning curve. Yes, as a professional I understand that I can do everything I need with just one resize handle but I would guess that the average person is going to have a panic ...


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It’s a good thing to have needed controls nearby. It’s also a good thing to have controls always in the same place. Your colleagues are probably right about the resize handle. Although mono-directional resize works well for a text edit box like the one I’m typing in now, it usually makes sense to choose which edge or corner remains unchanged – i.e. the ...


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I like the out of the box thinking. But established convention is often your friend in ux. Having those handle bars in all corners can quickly become intrusive if multiple objects are selected. Toolbar still is your best bet because there is tremendous benefit in having it in one fixed place from productivity perspective. You can and should hide the ...


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I decided to check the experts (FedEx) and they eliminate the first three fields right out of the gate, but just for their rate quote. Their sign up form is more like the international form above, but with one required address filed and a second not required. Countries with a postal code especially US 9 digit codes shouldn't even need all those address ...


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Everything looks click-able on a mobile device :-P What I don't understand, is your desire to drag the user into every corer of your app. As I see it, the graphs will give the (novice) user sufficient information. I'm pretty sure that more advanced users would tap the label or the graph if they wanted to read more about the details. But I'm not sure, ...


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I think that hints are the worse possible solution. It's like putting "Pull" on a door handle. You have several solutions. I would recommend having the phrase "clickable graphs" or "after having clicked the graph" interspersed in the copy; or instead of titleing the graph "XXX Graph" call it the "XXX [Clickable |Interactive | appropriate wod] Graph"



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