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When designing for mobile first, this approach is very ideal. It will likely lead to more action for the user, but when moving this back to desktop the experience can be cloned. It is assumed that mobile users might be using this phone while on the go and not on a desk thus 'lengthy' content per page is not very ideal as the user might not be looking at the ...


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I guess it's for having all the focus from the user. Having too much information on the same screen can have a negative effect, give the impression that there is too much to do.


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Quince is a great resource for UI elements and usage patterns. It is rather extensive and provides examples on when certain controls or elemtents are more appropriate than others and why.


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I am assuming from your description that 'sticky' headings in this sense is analogous to 'frozen' headings - I'm not sure how this could work otherwise (i.e. if the headings are 'pinned' to the top of a web page - given that you are going to have multiple tables - having multiple table headings pinned in place could get messy). So to answer your question ...


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This article answers this very well - [WEB AIM - Skip Navigation] Some key points: Providing visible links at the top of the page The key is to make sure the link is one of the first items that screen readers hear and that keyboard users tab to. Otherwise, users may not realize there is a "skip navigation" link there at all, and may waste time trying ...


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I love your idea, and it is used in other examples as well. (The LDS has a Gospel Library app, with a digital hymn book, that functions in a similar fashion.) But I have a few ideas to add, if they sound decent. This first idea is related to Google's Instant Results. Pretend I'm looking for hymn... #314, let's go with that. What if you made it so when I ...


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That pattern is a good start, both accessing a hymn by number or via a few words from its title or any of its verses. I would also suggest that include a "favorites list" and maybe something to facilitate pre-service preparation. By that, I mean that prior to a service beginning, a user could enter all of the hymns for the up coming service, then operate ...


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From a pure user standpoint, I see two reasons to do so. 1. Radio buttons double as bulletin points download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The left version of this list looks much more organized because it looks like a list, whereas on the right side there are three rows of text, with buttons at the end. In your ...


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This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...


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If you have a relationship / association with the other site you can frame them allowing your users to never "leave" your site (although in practice they do). * If you don't have an association with them then there isn't anything else you can do but write compelling copy explaining the benefits to the user for leaving and coming back. You can add incentives ...



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