Hot answers tagged

8

I'll just quickly point out three points: It'll look less clean. I mean this both figuratively and literally. Anytime you add more visual information to something it becomes more cluttered. This is why with very data-dense interfaces people often choose for flat design; it alleviates the business a bit. Secondly, some patterns can actually make it look as ...


5

Do they affect perception? No. In fact, the user will be grateful to see that you care. Think about it; who comes to your FAQ page? The users who really want to complete something but are not able to do so. And that visitors number would be less compared to those who complete the tasks without any issue - as you are stating that the website is easy to use. ...


3

You're probably not going to find data on this, because it's not the kind of things that publishable studies are usually focused on. If you're really lucky, some hyper-productive UXer will have turned some test data into blog post, but even then, the sample size will probably be small. This is a case where you have to make decisions based on the ...


2

Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap


2

Guidelines are just that: guidelines. They guide the development of your application, they do not make all of the decisions about your application. They document the best thinking about design at the time that the guidelines were written. They help you make a better application by focusing your time and attention on the decisions that matter to your ...


2

Buttons should say what they do, or actionable links in your case. "Conditions" doesn't mean squat. "Show Conditions" tells me exactly what action I'm about to take. Would most users figure out "Conditions"? Probably. Would more users figure out "Show/Hide Conditions"? Yes. Should you hide important legal information? No. But that's a different question.


1

The FAQ purpose, which is to help users efficiently and effectively use your site, should guide your decision how many and what questions to include. Ommit obvious or trivial questions and include questions that : help users build a correct mental model of your site help them avoid costly mistakes help them perform a task much more quickly prevent ...


1

From my perspective, FAQ doesn't affect perception of site because it is just to give clear information related to service provide by the site.If it is possible to shorten the answer as much as possible then there will be no issue having many FAQs. If site is providing service at large scale then it is better approach to clear the difficulties of the user. ...


1

Trust is relative Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a ...


1

I don't believe there is a specific design pattern for your exact example. But you want to combine a Tunnel with the Wizard. You might also consider the Good Defaults pattern if you feel there is need to influence the decision of the user.


1

If you are using d3.js,then you can probably create a matrix layout and plot your subject on one of its axis and let the other axis represent its objects,create color codes for each cell that would tell you about the various states of each object associated with the same object.After plotting it would look something similar : Based on color codes you can ...


1

I know what you are talking about because we've been facing similar problems adopting our brand to match material design. Our band is minimalistic and only uses 2 colors(just black and white), so google's emphasis on colors for animation and transitions in material design doesn't exactly work across brands like ours. The Oculus example you provided reminds ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible