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73

Quite simply don't do this. False expectations are the biggest source of a disappointing experience. It commits you to features that you may not be able/want to produce, users will assume very short timescales for this functionality to be in action, and it also highlights your apps weaknesses leading users to look for these elsewhere with your competitors. ...


21

People often want to put some form of "under construction" messages in their UI, because when you're making something new you're enthusiastic about its potential and want to communicate that enthusiasm to your users. But if you think about this from the user's point of view (which is the basis of good UX), it's not a good idea. Highlighting new features ...


21

"Scroll Spy" generally refers to a top or side navigation that dynamically changes as the user scrolls down the page. I think scroll spy is specific to dynamic navigation, but maybe something like "Scrolling Progress Bar" is fine. Here is a fiddle that may give you some more insight with JS and CSS. http://jsfiddle.net/sarathsprakash/PvVdq/68/


12

As some people already pointed, the way this UI element used on that particular site is redundant. As it not giving any value, and just replicates the native browser scrollbar information. I think it's just wrong usage of this element. I think, I thought this effect first on the YouTube. And it was used to show that there is a new content is loading via ...


5

What you describe is reminiscent of the popular "lean startup" idea of building a skeletal app or website which is known as an MVP - minimal viable product - and seeing who tries to use which features (including the 'sign up for paid account' feature) before you build them. You could potentially use this to your advantage to, say, figure out which features ...


5

I think this pattern can be called " List Entry View ". Full description can be found here, All list of patterns


3

Parameters in the URL make the URL not clean just by using them. I would rather go with URL structure like: https://example.com/products/secureEmail/ - to show the details of a product https://example.com/products/secureEmail/purchase/ - to start the procedure of buying https://example.com/products/secureEmail/purchase/?step=2 - to navigate to another step ...


2

This might not be a good idea to tease users, but as long as users are aware they are using a non-final version, this can be an important reassuring factor. Important (not for the core functionality of the application, but for the workflow of the user) features may still be unimplemented, but showing them already tells the user that they have been thought of ...


2

As long as the site is in "real beta" (as opposed to eternal beta): Grey out the links / give them a distinct color, and provide a mouseover that says "We are working on it!" I agree with the other replies that you should not wake false expectations. OTOH, advertising your current spec could greatly improve beta feedback, both by reducing the the ...


2

You could try to group related, relevant information together and leave out mutually exclusive items. As it is a read-only format there's not a lot of use in displaying the mutually exclusive NO answers (and possibly also some other NO answers). I'd suppose that if Veteran is answered with NO all other Veteran related answers are obsolete and of no good ...


2

How about an (red) "NO" icon or a (green) "Yes" icon to the left of each line? This way you save vertical space, but at least keep visual consistency (providing that you keep both icons the same width). Is there any other solution, like filtering the results to only show the positives or negatives, if that is what the user is after? This way you'll ...


1

How about just bolding the ones which are "YES" and others greyed out.


1

According to me, if you want to make the urls clean you should rewrite them instead of abbreviating. According to me, your URL's should be descriptive and short, but you shouldn't use initials to make it short, for example if you have an URL like https://example.com/purchase/?pcat=ps&p=se Now I don't get it what does ps and se stand for right? Also, ...


1

During the beta phase only, how about a pop-up which says "We're thinking of implementing this because..." along with vote-up/down buttons? That way you are able to gauge the interest in a feature as well as making your beta users feel engaged in the product development. It might also help to break the feeling of entitlement which a "Coming soon..." ...


1

I think it might depend on your user audience as well. If they are early adopters or say Kickstarter supporters in a closed beta, it might be a good idea to use a process similar to this in certain places to indicate where development is progressing. I wouldn't do it too far in advance however because of the possibility that you might portray a feature as ...


1

Two sites that I felt did an amazing job at this were: http://www.comcast.com/x1 For the X1 platform. As you scroll, you can see the bar progressing but it also adds indicators for what section it's on too. Then there's the MapQuest one: http://mobile.mapquest.com/#intro This one is a vertical indicator but love how moving to each step really loads ...


1

I would basically consider that a simple fixed-nav overlay 3 column layout: http://bradfrost.github.io/this-is-responsive/patterns.html http://www.adtile.me/fixed-nav/ But I really like the red scroll-progress indicator at the top of the fixed nav, that's a nice touch, both thoughtful for the user and helpful on devices where the scroll bars are not ...


1

I've seen a very similar bar in a mobile video game once, used to denote the player's progress until their next level. The main interest is that it is extremely compact, the main downside is that you need to figure out yourself what it is for (so only use that when there is no ambiguity as to what might be progressing and when the user can live without ...


1

I would call that a Toggle menu, a la Brad Frost's design patters library: http://codepen.io/bradfrost/full/sHvaz


1

Are you looking for a specific name for the combination of these two types of widgets or just a general name for input fields that are linked together? Would your definition also incorporate the country code selector that you often see in front of the phone number input field? I don't think you need a specific name for the combination of these two types of ...


1

In HTML, it's a select element and a text input. In iOS, it's a picker and a textfield. I don't know that there is a specific name for the combination of the two. That said, in HTML they can be linked with some JavaScript / jQuery that changes the placeholder text based on what option is chosen. I quickly created a jsFiddle demo that demonstrates this ...


1

After talking to our developers about what is possible with our data model, I've proposed a design similar to this: My users are only likely to change a field or two at a time, so instead of showing the entire form with 20 fields, it lets them select the field(s) they wish to edit and ignore the rest. In the event they select a conditional field I've ...


1

Can the one survive without the other? If you leave out the text, will people still understand the walkthrough? And vice versa, will people still understand the walkthrough if you leave out the images? This way you can determine which content is primary. If your images tell the whole story I would show the images first and support those with text. This ...


1

I hadn't seen this before, but it seems that somebody mistakenly used what is being used as a progress bar indicating page load to indicate page progress. I think it started since iOS7, although I had seen it in other sites, where this pattern is exclusively used for page load, which I think is very slick modern and efficient. As others mentioned, this is ...


1

I would call it something like a "reading progress indicator". I enjoy how it gives me gradual reading feedback as I read. There are some issues, however. It is true that the element is redundant provided that scrollbars are always visible. It has become more and more common to hide the scrollbars when not in use, however. Personally I don't like this ...



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