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50

I believe the usual justification is to prevent folks from copying and pasting the content so that they don't steal it. I usually roll my eyes at this because if a user really wants that text, you can get it one way or another, even with selection disabled. I came across another example: a developer wanted to disable selection because double-clicking a ...


34

It's a myth that selectable text is "costless" As a general principle you are right that text should be selectable. That said, since you're asking about non-selectable text, here are some cases to be aware of for disabling text selection. There are visual elements containing text that users don't expect to be selectable. For example: Let's walk through ...


32

There is a reason when disabling the selection of text makes sense, and that is if selection of text could interfere with functional aspects of the UI. For example, it is frequently used on widgets that are draggable because you want to avoid that the user accidentally selects text when he intends to drag.


12

Disabling selectable text is horrible UX for non-native speakers of the language the text is written in, who may rely on copy-and-paste to automated translation software or website to make sense of the text. This is becoming less of an issue with ubiquitous smartphones with high-quality cameras and OCR translation apps, but I believe it's still relevant.


7

The simple answer to this question is NEVER. Restricting the ability to select text won't keep competitors from stealing your content but it will make it virtually impossible for customers to easily share it.


3

They are both UX frameworks, but are very differently opinionated Material design is very opinionated about how UX elements behave and interact visually. It starts with general principles around visual elements (physics, light, space, momentum) and expands on those principles to provide concrete examples and requirements for specific elements (buttons, ...


2

I don't think Material is a framework, but I agree it depends on the definition of framework. If I use this: In computer programming, a software framework is an abstraction in which software providing generic functionality can be selectively changed by additional user-written code, thus providing application-specific software. A software framework ...


2

Bootstrap is mainly a responsive grid system, with some default UI look and feel decisions made for you (that you can easily over-ride). Materialize is mainly a set of UI elements and interactions (but also has a grid). And then there's about 2,000 other UI CSS frameworks out there as well. Rarely do you use these frameworks out of the box, so what is ...


2

As you point out, different apps use different conventions for CtrlEnter vs ShiftEnter for newline vs submit. Some guidelines Make shortcuts optional. If you offer keyboard shortcuts for newline vs submit, it's best to make them optional because they are not obvious features. For example, do not depend on CtrlEnter to submit: it's best to also add a ...


1

Generally, there are two reasons: Clarity It's odd to have the text of a button or dropdown selectable. It'd be confusing for my cursor to turn to a beam, as if the primary interaction I will have is selecting/editing the text that is there. You could have an arrow cursor and still have it selectable, but that's weird too. Polish Selectable text is the ...


1

Hope that you already are familiar with Don Norman. I think your question/topic is closely related to Normans Gulf of Evaluation and Gulf of Execution. We always want narrow gulfs in UI. To accomplish that, we can work with Normans design principles. I think it all comes down to making UI's that has as low required mental model for the user as possible. ...



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