Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

35

I would go with a cross icon, e.g.: but display a red version of it when it's hovered. Try this: go to Google Images search and type "delete icon". You will see mostly "x" icons. Update: I gotta agree with @peterchen; a hand drawn" "x" without the extra bounding box/circle would reduce chances of confusion with a Close icon. The following shows an ...


25

AOL was notorious for making account cancellation a terrible task to perform. Everything in your application should be a joy, including cancellation. Make sure they understand the consequences of actions you can not undo, but make it clear and fun. The moment of cancellation is an opportunity to show the user how awesome you are. Don't make it hard to ...


15

If you're going to have an undo button, don't make it something that disappears after a few seconds. Put it there until the user takes some other action. The ideas of making the item grey and having a temporary list is good thinking, but rather than do that, why not just have a permanent "deleted items" list on a separate screen? That way I can always go ...


12

The wording "delete mode" is not so user-friendly, pretty technical, just by reading it without seeing your explanation, I really didn't know what it is. Do you have any other operations other than "delete" that could be applied to one or multiple pictures? If you do, you should have a "select items" button, and it will get into a mode where you select ...


10

The problem with your current mock-up is that the 'Delete'-button is the most visible one. My immediate thought when I saw your mock-up was that the 'Delete'-button was the primary action. Although it's not flat enough for that your 'Save'-button looks disabled on first view. It doesn't jump out like the 'Delete'-button does. Make sure your primary action ...


9

You can avoid the automatic clicking of users in different manners. Apart from confirmation dialogs, here are some options less intrusive but also effective: One option is to fake reversibility by delaying the actual action. You can delay the real deletion of content and show a "confirmation" for the deletion to the user with the undo option. Later ...


8

How about providing a brief message that's displayed right after the action, giving you a chance to reconsider? "You un-friended Jack. You will no longer receive updates from him. Undo?" If the message doesn't open a dialog but appears on the page itself, and it disappears automatically a second later, then it can be very subtle and non-interfering. This is ...


7

Well, the confirmation dialogue is really there as an error prevention mechanism; similarly the undo method Rahul mentions above is an error recovery mechanism. Both are used to protect the user from losing work; they are not mutually exclusive and they do not always have to be used in tandem. My advice is weigh up the frequency of task with how serious the ...


7

Firstly don't rely on colour only, a surprisingly large number of people have difficulty interpreting colours. Position would be a better way of differentiating, or using contrast or borders. As far as the wording goes: ask yourself this question: when a person is in the supermarket, do they delete or clear an item from their trolley ? If you asked 100 ...


5

It depends (of course!) on how often deletion is an action that is likely to occur. I obviously agree with the sentiment that tasks need to be made easy to perform - that's a given. However, deleting a lot of content should perhaps be slightly less easy - provided it happens infrequently. If deleting stuff happens every five minutes then it should be as ...


5

Users will want to have full control of the content they post. This will be the case whether the context is a social networking site, a discussion forum, themed communities etc. If you block the possibility for a user to remove content they have added to the site you will produce agitation in that user. And if you keep content posted/accessible that a user ...


4

A hand-drawn X seems most intuitive, with that I agree with the other answers - especially if its color and shape sticks out a bit from other icons nearby. To add some options, I sometimes go with a simple text link "Delete" or "Remove" if there's not a lot of other actions to take - even in longer lists, just to be extra clear. A story about us ...


4

Firstly, I'm not sure if this is the right location for a delete function - my first instinct was that the 'delete' function might resemble a 'clear form' function of some sort - so it would probably be better to attach the delete button at a higher level of abstraction (e.g. the list of flights), or at least make the action less ambiguous. As for position, ...


4

Delete is an option that you don't want anyone to accidentally click, so you should de-emphasise delete as much as is reasonable. If you make it red (as you did in your example), you will draw attention to it. Instead, you should draw attention to the normal action (save in this case). You should place the delete far enough away that an accidental ...


3

As well as being bad practice, in business terms there's little/no benefit to be had by preventing an unsatisfied customer from terminating their relationship with you. After all, if the user has already reached the decision that he/she wants to delete their account then it's already too late to fix the problem (though it's probably worth including an ...


3

I would not opt for a separate confirmation pages or dialog boxes because I feel you * punish* a missclick too heavily. Generally I don't like the flash message: what happens when they delete a user wrongfully but for some reason miss the flash message (internet issues, just don't see it). I think you should only take this route if the action can be ...


3

Undo If that's possible in any way, offer a decent undo function of the operation of the current session / page. In the last decade, the user model has changed from "the user reads the manual and knows what he does, generally" to "the user experiments until he figures out how things work". This is not always possible depending on the data involved (or ...


3

Some software and websites address this issue by proposing to reassign the whole set of users to an existing "Unassigned users" or another role that the user can choose. That's a good thing to do because you don't prevent the user to achieve his primary task i.e. "remove a role". You stay out of the people's way. So to help him get further, I'd propose him ...


3

It depends on how you are dealing with the recently emptied pages. Do you show it as an empty page for a short duration before removing it altogether? Or, do you immediately give a 404 error? Scenario 1: You should be redirected to the 4th page since you deleted the last only entry on the 'last page' and you should be redirected to the new last page. You ...


3

Regarding the first scenario: It is a good practice to avoid orphaned items; my advice is to stick to 10 users per page and show 11 users at 4th page. Now if you delete all items on 4th page, remove the page number from pagination and take user back to third page. Regarding the second scenario: It will be best to update the list in real time via AJAX and ...


3

First point: Remove is a real word in common English use. Delete is a 'made up computer word' which (correct me if I'm wrong) doesn't exist much in common English. Choose a word which lets the user make a metaphoric relationship with the task they're doing: "I know what remove means in the real world, so I guess I know what it will do in this webpage" ...


2

I rather prefer a red 'x' icon indicating the action, like Dropbox does. Or the iOS approach, just a red button with the text "Delete".


2

One factor to think about is that of the "malicious" or "mischievious" friend. Or, simply, that people change their minds. I suggest that you give users a way to deactivate their account, but with an escape hatch of some kind - an emailed confirmation link perhaps, or "account deletion will occur in 30 days unless you change your mind".


2

We talk about “destructive” actions like Delete and Remove as if they were in a special class requiring special protection. In reality, nearly all actions both create and destroy. Changing my document view for Print to Outline “destroys” one presentation of information for the sake of another. The question to ask is, “how serious are the consequences if the ...


2

Possible duplicate of Android List View - delete row button, delete selected button or delete from item click menu. You may want to take a look at that question and see if it addresses what you're asking about.


2

I came across this post on the 37signals blog. It's an interesting idea to have a confirmation dialogue box but do something like this to make people think about it first. Edit: Rick Mans suggested a solution today that I thought was quite elegant. Remove the content, but send the person an email at the end of the session saying that x has been deleted ...


2

Along with the description of the problem, give a list of the users which have the role, in the same format and with the same functions available as user lists are ordinarily presented. Then the administrator can select any or all of the users and change their roles, or examine them to see why they have this role, or any other action you and I haven't ...


2

I think that these actions have something in common, so I think you may put them under the "Revoke access" action with details hidden behind the confirmation dialog. It will not only limit the number of actions visible on the page (and it will be easy to use) but also make the difference more clear: And in a case user was already blocked there will be two ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible