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116

I would like to advise you not to use Yes/No as radio buttons. It is advised to use sentence style labels in imperative style. Now, to answer the question in which order the options should appear, here is what MS UX style guide recommends: List the options in a logical order, such as most likely to be selected to least, simplest operation to most ...


68

Why won't you rather use a checkbox that says "include pictures"? A YES/NO is 1/0, therefore a case for a checkbox.


55

I was on the Excel team when this was designed. Backstory If you remember the version of Excel right before you could have multiple worksheets, that version had a concept, IIRC called WORKSPACES, that let you link multiple worksheets into a workspace which could be opened and closed together. The idea was that if you had 7 spreadsheets, one macro sheet, ...


30

What We Know So Far: The first browser did not use Backspace to go back a page: Several Mosaic menu or button functions have keyboard equivalents. Among them: b, equivalent to the Back button Source: http://www.uoxray.uoregon.edu/local/manuals/biosym/discovery/Html_Help/navigating.html First Netscape Navigator (evolved from Mosaic) Did Not Use ...


25

I respectfully disagree with Michael's answer. I can't speak to desktop GUIs, but in web forms you want to avoid having a default unless you believe a large portion of your user's (maybe 90%+) will select that value. Particularly if it's a required field. Why? Because you're likely to introduce errors because people breeze through forms quickly online - ...


19

I don't know how it started but I can add my two cents about what ALL my clients say: $%!$% what the @$#%#% just happened? Why did the page change? Now I have to fill in that form all over again. I would love to see this go away for good, and the first thing I do when building a form laden website is the following jQuery script: var hasfocus = 'false'; ...


18

By definition, a filter is a tool that help users narrow down to a subset of results that is most interesting to them. Consequently, when a filter is active, the results displayed should be less than the total number of original results. For this reason, I find option B not intuitive enough. If I'm not mistaken, option B treats the icons using an additive ...


10

Yes, the "I agree box" being defaulted to off is legal issue not a UX one. You'll want to get your solution approved by your legal team; different teams have different standards and there's no one "most legal" way to do it, so that I have to leave to you. Arguably there's a UX issue here in trying to make sure users read your legalese, but I'll consider ...


10

How did this come about? In 2005 this was implemented on Mozilla Firefox for the following reasons: The backspace key was mapped to the browser ‘Back’ function in Mozilla for consistency with Internet Explorer. However, to improve consistency with other applications running on Linux, it was decided that this mapping should be optional—and set ...


9

It's your call whether it should be Yes/No or No/Yes. But it should be consistent across the entire app. This poses a concern for your reasoning because in some places Yes might be the default option and No might be default somewhere. Even though they are both within the same page / app. A good workaround would be to use verbs. Save / Don't save is better ...


7

Mixing opt-in and opt-out is totally bad UX as it leads to a lot of confusion. The meaning of both lists should be consistent, so there should be either opt-out or opt-in for both groups: Do you want to receive information from us by: []post []phone []email []SMS [] Do you want to receive information from our carefully selected premium ...


7

I don't think it is related to UX. The reasoning behind is that if you require the user to check that she have read the agreement, the fact that she doesn't is her fault. If the checkbox is checked by default, the user can simply say that she never checked anything, and just submitted the form with default values. In other words, making it harder to fill ...


6

A blank value really isn't a good idea - it doesn't really provide a visual clue, and may even imply to some users that the field is not required. Saying something like "Select an Animal" along with the same type of visual cue that you use for other required fields (the most common being the red asterisk) should help convey the point.


5

This is a question I've never found the 'right' answer to. Leaving it blank seems as valid as making it a command 'select one'. In the end, it may not be a major issue. I do think it does make sense to not default it to a valid selection, though. If I had to come up with arguments for both options: blank = easy to scan the form to see what you haven't ...


5

Opt-in vs opt-out is a legal question and (if it's for communication) in most countries (USA and Europe included). Any agreement to communicate with someone has to be an opt-in, otherwise that communication is legally spam, and anyone receiving it (in a country where it is illegal) may sue you. In fact there are people who make their living suing people ...


4

The default should be a legitimate value. This is the practice in nearly all desktop GUIs, and it has worked fine for decades. Windows 7 UX Interaction Guidelines specifically say to “Select the safest (to prevent loss of data or system access) and most secure option by default. If safety and security aren’t factors, select the most likely or convenient ...


4

There are several problems with adding labels and hints within the field, namely; Once you've added in the content the label/hint has then been cleared out which makes it hard to reread the form and see what you've done wrong If the browser has Javascript disabled then it's likey the labels will remain within the field and have to be deleted by the user ...


4

I don't think there's a single right answer here—it depends on the likely behaviour the user will want based on what you're searching for. If there is a very high volume defaulting to a single day is a good thing. For some kinds of data it's very likely the user will want the "to" date to default to now/today. For some kinds of data they'd want the "from" ...


4

That feature is inherited from windows explorer feature, that migrated to Internet Explorer and then to other browsers. It became a de facto standard, due that most computers had Windows and Internet Explorer


4

I think a good alternative here was to use a toggle switch (like Android) instead of radio buttons.


3

You could look at doing it interactively. When the user clicks on the search field to enter text, have the instruction fade in below the text box in a different colour, like green, that says something straightforward like "search with numbers or letters". That way it won't be too casual and it will never get in the way of your UI, but best of all, it ...


3

I would agree with you that in general having the default page show absolutely nothing isn't the best choice. I think you have a couple of options here to solve your slow loading problem. All of these patterns below assume that even if you apply some filters, you may end up with a list as big as the default page anyways. Implement Continuous Scrolling. ...


3

OkCupid has an interesting way of dealing with this that you may want to take a look at. Basically, you can add filter criteria by selecting an additional one from the Advanced dropdown list, and you can remove existing filters (other than the basic ones) by selecting the x on the right of the optional filter. This has the advantage that only the filters ...


3

I cant give you an answer from an UX perspective unless there is some user testing done to support the data but as a user,when ever I am making changes to a document and I want to save it ,I prefer to save it in the same directory ( i.e. option no: 2) to ensure that the relevant documents are present in the same location. However I would recommend that you ...


3

Here is a suggestion from a well-known piece of software. This is in a dialog box, so pressing enter just performs the default action, while the other options almost require the mouse to reach. Pro: Clear; Groups similar actions; Promotes default action. Con: It could be hard to find the optional actions.


3

At my company (4 million online customers) we noticed that confronting users with these kind of patterns resulted in harvesting very bad (false) contact information. If users don't want spam, they just don't want spam. That's the easy part. Convincing the marketing department with targets on harvesting quantity instead of quality is the hard part. Bottom ...


3

This warning is "allowed" by the browser. Each browser implements the behavior differently. However, it is most common to allow the user to "leave this page" by default. The reason is that pages can maliciously prevent you from closing the window with a simple script and the user is forced to take action to leave a page. Making this choice the default, ...



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