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66

I don't have a pointer to published research - but in my experience US folk will always assume the US MM/DD/YYYY format unless they are knowingly using an non-US site, and are already aware of the potential differences. If you have to use numbers only then the format that causes least confusion across cultures in my experience is YYYY-MM-DD since it ...


21

People operate on dates in variety of ways: absolute (e.g. December, 21) relative (e.g. yesterday, last Monday, tommorow, next Friday, next week, soon, etc.) As you see, relative way is often prevalent. Calendar with next/previous dates extends the context of use and support relative date references and natural dates flow. Finally, calendar is just a ...


18

Date pickers are helpful when your concerned dates fall within the context of a month or so but not several years apart as jumping between years would require laboriously many clicks. Date selectors are not just helpful in reducing the typing errors but they also standardize the formats when several correct variations are possible. For Americans, the ...


10

If you want to refer to a point in time, you need to either give the time, or give a relative time. So that translates to either something like 11:32 today or 5 hours ago. Simply stating "5 hours" tells you nothing really as it is a measurement of a duration of time and nothing more without a reference point. So don't use this. When people use forums and ...


7

You should definitely allow the user to make this choice independent of their locale settings. Many people will want their planner calendar to match up to other calendar software in which they may have made custom settings, or to match features of their work schedule or lifestyle that might not be represented in the standard for their locale.


7

I like both ideas, although I'm leaning more towards the second design because it better illustrates the idea of fullness (of schedule) which is what you're trying to convey. In the first design, the days with more tasks are more prominent than the ones with less tasks, which is the opposite of what the user is going to be looking for (less busy days). If ...


7

Other reasons for using a calendar widget (besides taking care of format): Picking date ranges: from/to, start/end, depart/return dates. Providing custom presets for dates and date ranges such as: "A week from now" or "Month to date". Associating date and time (when time is required). They are inseparable in real-life, why separate them (in different ...


5

It seems it is just convention, as you can also see at this discussion. The American format follows the phrase "November fifth", while the European one follows "the fifth of November". When designing an interface you might find useful having fields with the name of the month, like 05 - Nov - 2013 or Nov - 05 -2013 instead of using numbers and ...


5

The international standard defined in ISO 8601 is that a week begins on Monday. That means that you don't set someones week starting with Sunday based on language configurations. Monday is always the correct default. If you want to give the user the choice to use a nonstandard calendar that starts with Sunday, the user should make that choice himself.


5

Sorry, first it looks too complex. Still, calendar view provides much better user experience in date-related matters. This is an Excel quick sketch. The root of the promlems with you current design is in time perception by human and bad human abilities of mental manipulation with data. Some possible issues are: weak relation to current date requires ...


5

You're trying to relay the "fullness" of a day but neither visualization provides that information at a glance. The heatmap needs a key, and the horizontal bar feels more like a progress indicator. A pie, while widely panned, is a common indicator of "fullness". Here's a quick mockup to give some flavor. It works great with your defined rule of 0 to 4 ...


5

WHEN They are extremely useful for planning events in the future or for exploring times in the past as well as planning ranges for examination of some sort. Use it anytime you could see your user going to their calendar on the wall and attempting to plan the future or examine past events. WHY The calendar is probably one of the greatest examples of ...


4

You would have to test with your audience, but I would opt for symbols where they are clear to most people. For anything numerical, X > Y is clear. I can't speak for all cultures, but I covered this in grade 4 at school, so I would assume the majority of people have at least this level of mathematical understanding. I would also opt to do the same for ...


4

Consider: Start: Mon 9/1/2014, 8PM Ends: Tue 9/2/2014, 12AM (28 hours long) Although not directly in your question, be prepare for 12AM to confuse users - is it midnight or midday (the former is the convention, but many people don't know this). By the way, if your event is never more than 6 hours long consider: Start: Mon 9/1/2014, 8PM Length: 4 ...


4

The date should be shown only once, but aligned with the first date, but not show the dash indicating it's a range. I think showing the same date twice is very confusing, because the user does not only read the same date twice. After seeing what seems to be the same date twice, he would need to reread it to make sure he did not just misread. Then he needs ...


3

As you can see, the calendar control in your example uses a 6-week format. A 31-day month with two days or less in one calendar week will have at least one day in each of six calendar weeks (four "complete" weeks, two days in a fifth week and one day in the sixth). So, your calendar must be able to show that many weeks in order to be able to show every ...


3

I would recommend you to look at how others have solved this kind of problem before. I took inspiration from how financial sites update stock graphs based on date ranges. (e.g have a look at Avanza) Make the year, month, day options into buttons. Their is no reason why a user should have to click two different elements when it could be done immediately. ...


3

First impression: The radio group seems a little bit confusing (since I don't know the context). Does that mean I can choose to "update" based on: (1) Just the year, (2) Just year and month (specifying a specific month), (3) Full date range ? In that case, you may want to know how frequently a typical user would go for each option. Another concern may be ...


3

The UK site GOV.UK published some initial test findings about how users on mobile devices use a DOB field they were testing against. Initial reports suggested that having two dropdowns (one for day and one for month) followed by a text field for year was well received by users, although not exclusively. (emphasis mine). ...This tested much better, and ...


3

Please see ISO 8601 (eg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601) yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss First, this is simply the largest to the smallest unit. No other argument--no matter how tightly held--can seem to overcome this logic. The 4-digit year removes any confusion as to what the other numbers represent--even when the hyphens are left out. (Use of a 2-digit ...


3

A combination is normally a good way to go. As an example, the London Underground website allows you to check train schedules at a given date/time. When you go onto the site, it defaults to 'Today' for the date and the current time: When you choose to edit the date, while giving a date picker, it also provides quick links to "today" and "tomorrow", ...


3

I would suggest a combination of the two. The first is great for instantly knowing which days have something but shades require looking at a key which is user friction The second is great for knowing quantity but is somewhat busy so seeing which days have something at a glance is not as clear (although it is relatively clear) A combo approach would be all ...


3

What about using dots? It is very similar to the bar graph, but doesn't give the same feeling of waiting (a progress bar is usually something you watch fill up). The dots convey the same information, but not the "progress"ness of the bar. Also, I used background color to represent today's date, and border to represent selected day. Two different things that ...


3

I think your two bullet points succinctly sum up when they make sense and when they don't. Our error, perhaps, is that we've long called them 'date pickers'. They really should be called 'day-of-the-week' pickers in that they are useful when, as you point out, the visual cue of a calendar makes sense...when you need to know the day of the week, or which ...


3

The simplest notation I've seen is to simply bold them. Another option is to give them a slightly different background color. It really depends on how you are using other elements to indicate events on days. It often helps to include in the top row the list of days so that it is clear whether you are formatting using S M T W R F S or M T W R F S S for your ...


3

Depending on how flexible you are with your interface design, you could have them default to entering 14 for weeks and 14d for 14 days or vice versa. Display it as 13w 6d with some logic behind to catch the zeroes. If it is a non-mouse workflow, typing is fine to optimize for. As for the sorting, again depending on the design environment you might be able to ...


3

whats the best way to handle the mixture of leadtimes? Since you want to have a universal reference point, you would want to use your loweset time unit as the reference point. For example, if your lowest time unit available is hours, then all user inputted time should be converted to hours. Of course, this should happen in the back-end for sorting and ...


2

Maybe even less "boolean" kind of language than your suggestion. Instead of URL contains google.com and Visits > 1000 and Date is before 30.12.2011 maybe a more language-ish approach might be better The address contains google.com and has more visits than 1000 and it was created before 30.12.2011 If the string gets really long, mabye splitting it up ...


2

Perhaps start with the year first? You'll initially throw someone off, but for a good reason. I have never seen a YYYY-DD-MM structure in the wild, only YYYY-MM-DD. It would seem to follow for users that this may not be how they are used to seeing the date, but it does make the expectations clear. You could also locate a key nearby for any date format (if ...


2

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I believe that single field (with guidance) paired with the number keypad is the fastest way to input birth dates. The amount of time a user will have to scroll through or tap through things can be reduced if you just give them full control to enter it manually. They'll spend the ...



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