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113

Imagine you’re telling a friend a story about a time you took a flying class. You want to give an idea of when the story takes place. What format should you supply the time in? Should you say “The date was 2014/12/31 and the time was 16:05:03 PST”? Of course not. The point of the story isn’t the exact time you took the class. You want to focus on ...


67

I would go with this kind of UI, reasoning: Users only select the dates that he/she is applying leave for without having to think about first day of leave and first day of work. Leave balance is not displayed on the same screen as it might get too cluttered and might confuse the users. For "leave balance" checking, I would suggest to make it accessible ...


45

Not enough reputation to comment, but on many sites with this "friendly" time, you can actually hover to get the exact time. Try it over on this question's "asked" and "active" times on the right hand side.


24

This is the use of relative timestamps. In relative timestamps, accuracy isn't important, and immediacy of scanning prevails over accuracy, so things like this may happen, where you see "1 year ago" until Aug 15, 2015, where you'll see 2 years ago. There's a lot of controversy about this approach, and IMHO, it's correct that you could add something a bit ...


21

Timestamps aren't meant for most users Showing friendly names such as 2 hours ago or yesterday can quickly provide context to the user as opposed to showing them 2015-01-27 18:54:03.259 Mixing both formats together will always cause friction (anything that forces a user to ask a question in their mind adds to cognitive friction). In almost all cases ...


13

I’ve considered the question recently due to travelling and booking hostels. The same problem appears there, since whether you book the night or the day can be confusing indeed. For usability reasons, the left one is a better choice since the user doesn’t have to do the maths. In this case, the best way to help the user is to be clear in the definition of ...


12

You've caught a common bug (IME) in the implementation of these relative time/date stamps -- at a step-change in the precision you lose a lot of information due to rounding, and the rounding is always down. It's common (I assume due to a built in library) on Android apps to get "59 minutes ago" (more precise than needed) then "1 hour ago" displayed for the ...


6

The way Airbnb does it is great. When picking you would have the "First day of leave, First day of work" option. And when tapped, the calendar shows in an infinite scroll starting today and onward, in your case you could even color differently the days that don't count as leave days. They mark the leave days in the calendar nicely, even if they start one ...


5

Displaying the day of the week (e.g. Monday, Tuesday) usually only makes sense when the date is either recently passed (i.e. within the last week) or in the future. When a date has recently passed, stating the day of the week makes it easier to recognise within that limited context. For future events, knowing on what day of the week it's due to take place is ...


4

It has been pointed out that internationalization and localization are the ideal solutions. But what if you have no way of knowing the best locale for the user in question? There is also a 'grey area' where the date information is not very important for the users and it is better for the developer to have a quick solution so that s/he can concentrate ...


4

This is very straightforward: you have to use the standard date picker control for each platform as outlined in the appropriate design guide. Here's Android class reference, iOS class reference, and Windows Phone class reference. If you're working on a web app, it's still better to use native date pickers to minimize user confusion and provide a consistent ...


3

Some quick observations: I try to avoid using legends, because they force the user's eye to dart around the page just to understand what boxes mean. The "radio button/circle inside a box" is visually distracting. As a user it isn't clear whether the circle is an indicator or a radio button. Visually, it's a distracting layout because it uses the same ...


3

Ballistics A concept some term ballistics provides a good guide for this. It asserts that: A system should not interrupt a user while performing a task, until the latest point possible or necessary. The idea is that users formulate an action plan for a task (or subtask) and any interruption that is not essential diverges users from their original plan ...


3

YYYY-MM-DD is the standard date format, but almost nobody knows it. My personal preference for clarity is DD/MMM/YYYY with the month as a three-letter abbreviation. If I were making an app, though, I'd use whatever format is standard on the user's device, as per locale settings.


2

I don't think the question keeps UX in mind. The whole idea in UX is that a system lands itself to the users, and part of it is that users can interpret the interface (and its content). If in country X the common format is dd/mm/yyyy and in another mm/dd/yyyy, you should really support the locale instead of trying to find a catch-all solution. Consider ...


2

It depends on the context. For example, the most common use for dates in an email program is viewing the most recent messages. In this context, sorting undated messages as newer than everything else would clog up the view, so undated messages get sorted as if they were infinitely old. On the other hand, if lack of a date represents an incompletely-entered ...


2

Something relevant for choosing data format : The source of the user's input: If you know the source from user's input is formatted in some way you will want to maintain that format, because you don't want the user to make unnecessary mental conversions. Examples of this are expiration days in credit cards or invoices (at least in my country). If there're ...


2

What's the user's goal? Clearly, the design is intending to let the user set a recurring monthly reminder. At least, that's clearly the intent on the 1st through the 30th of the month. Would it be wrong to simply round down any number that exceeds the number of days in a given month? That is consistent with the intent. Because, seriously, I can't think of ...


2

Using calendar-like UI for managing schedules/events is good. To provide better user experience, you need to use the Calendar UI as primary control. This means you organize flow in the following sequence: Set date/time date using the Calendar UI (direct manupulation) Set additional data (Customer, Address, etc.) (Optional) Adjust the data: a) ...


2

One plausible UX reason for this is preventing the situation where a user sees a date, fails to notice the year, and due to the proximity of month/day, assumes that the post was made within the past few days/weeks rather than (possibly many) years ago. This sort of user error can lead to embarrassing answers/comments/follow-ups on content where they're no ...


2

The simplest solution I can think of is a numerical text input followed by a drop down for unit size - something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

The first aid I can give you is to request you break down your Management app's capability to an irreducible threshhold. "Computers automate tasks." There is only so much automation or reduction inherent in the system of a task. This may be the result... Client name ----------------------hand entry unavoidable Client address ------------------hand ...


1

To answer this question, you should validate different scenarios that users are trying to change the start date: - By mistake: If a user has already selected start date and end date and noticed they have chosen a wrong start date for their plan, they want to change that to another day, your system must let them to apply this change quickly. The best user ...


1

When I think "booking", I think calendar. Almost every transportation service (buses, metro, planes) does that, it's very fast and intuitive. In order to display dates with "special events", some calendars put an emphasis on the date, either by coloring them, changing the background or with bold text. You can also indicate the status of a date's events by ...


1

Usualy, software supports two sub-patterns for the monthly reccurence pattern: based on the day of the month (1 - 31) two descriptive fields You want to use the first sub-pattern but users would create more unambiguous reminder for the last day of the month with the second. The second sub-pattern should consist of two list values, first having options ...


1

This is a situation that has been well thought-through by travel websites who often come across the same problem: they need to show a timetable of flights departing on a given day, but some of the flights will land the next day. As a result, this approach has been extensively tested: If you don't want to use a multiline format, you can shorten the day ...


1

During my work, I found that most people (including me) like single fields together with a format helper label (_____ DD/MM/YYYY) best. It is easy and fast to type and everyone should get the formatting hint. Plus, it's easy to evaluate and work with afterwards in your program. Bonus: Most mobile devices have the common separators (/,.) present on the ...


1

I have zero experience of iOS listener events (if that is what they are called). This is the way I would deal with this (if I have understood the context properly). So your application requires the user to be above a certain age. Say 13, you would expect the user to enter in the year field a value equal to or less than 2002. If this is your goal showing ...


1

The Question's Title (repeated in the body too) is : Should UTC timestamps include day of the week or not? The answer is "it depends": If humans don't need to know the Day-of-Week for a timestamp, then No. If humans do need to know the day-of-week for the timestamp, but they can have the date processed for them order to determine the day-of-week, ...


1

We face that ALL the time at work (sales orders, etc...). The newest items default to the top and the dateless items are placed at the bottom (under the oldest date). To find them the user has to select ascending order to place them at the top. Users don't have the slightest problem with them.



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