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66

I would go with this kind of UI, reasoning: Users only select the dates that he/she is applying leave for without having to think about first day of leave and first day of work. Leave balance is not displayed on the same screen as it might get too cluttered and might confuse the users. For "leave balance" checking, I would suggest to make it accessible ...


27

The international standard ISO 8601 specifies a notation that uses the slash “/” between dates expressed in the year-month-day notation, e.g. 2014-07-15/2015-08-01 This is the only reasonable globalized notation. But it should normally be used only a) internally in data representation when a date range needs to be represented as one string and b) as the ...


21

Timestamps aren't meant for most users Showing friendly names such as 2 hours ago or yesterday can quickly provide context to the user as opposed to showing them 2015-01-27 18:54:03.259 Mixing both formats together will always cause friction (anything that forces a user to ask a question in their mind adds to cognitive friction). In almost all cases ...


13

I’ve considered the question recently due to travelling and booking hostels. The same problem appears there, since whether you book the night or the day can be confusing indeed. For usability reasons, the left one is a better choice since the user doesn’t have to do the maths. In this case, the best way to help the user is to be clear in the definition of ...


11

In my experience if you want them to focus on something, you need to make it as clear as possible. If you are looking to have them focus on the month, then you should focus on the month directly. Comparing your two examples, the second one is far, far easier to understand, but I would definitely use the full month names, instead of dates. I think the month ...


11

I think it's better to put n-dash symbol (U+2013) without spaces on sides. This is typographically right. There is no strict rules about it so you are free to use western tradition. What is the difference between dash and n-dash, you can read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dash


6

The way Airbnb does it is great. When picking you would have the "First day of leave, First day of work" option. And when tapped, the calendar shows in an infinite scroll starting today and onward, in your case you could even color differently the days that don't count as leave days. They mark the leave days in the calendar nicely, even if they start one ...


5

Displaying the day of the week (e.g. Monday, Tuesday) usually only makes sense when the date is either recently passed (i.e. within the last week) or in the future. When a date has recently passed, stating the day of the week makes it easier to recognise within that limited context. For future events, knowing on what day of the week it's due to take place is ...


4

It has been pointed out that internationalization and localization are the ideal solutions. But what if you have no way of knowing the best locale for the user in question? There is also a 'grey area' where the date information is not very important for the users and it is better for the developer to have a quick solution so that s/he can concentrate ...


4

This is very straightforward: you have to use the standard date picker control for each platform as outlined in the appropriate design guide. Here's Android class reference, iOS class reference, and Windows Phone class reference. If you're working on a web app, it's still better to use native date pickers to minimize user confusion and provide a consistent ...


3

Some quick observations: I try to avoid using legends, because they force the user's eye to dart around the page just to understand what boxes mean. The "radio button/circle inside a box" is visually distracting. As a user it isn't clear whether the circle is an indicator or a radio button. Visually, it's a distracting layout because it uses the same ...


3

Ballistics A concept some term ballistics provides a good guide for this. It asserts that: A system should not interrupt a user while performing a task, until the latest point possible or necessary. The idea is that users formulate an action plan for a task (or subtask) and any interruption that is not essential diverges users from their original plan ...


3

I would feel relatively safe in assuming that any 2 digits that are equal to or less than the last 2 digits of the current year are describing the current year. So today, it would be numbers 00-14. There is a small chance that there are people 100+ years old that will be excluded but in today's world, when I say "back in '07" I mean 2007 and not 1907 so ...


2

I don't think the question keeps UX in mind. The whole idea in UX is that a system lands itself to the users, and part of it is that users can interpret the interface (and its content). If in country X the common format is dd/mm/yyyy and in another mm/dd/yyyy, you should really support the locale instead of trying to find a catch-all solution. Consider ...


2

YYYY-MM-DD is the standard date format, but almost nobody knows it. My personal preference for clarity is DD/MMM/YYYY with the month as a three-letter abbreviation. If I were making an app, though, I'd use whatever format is standard on the user's device, as per locale settings.


2

It depends on the context. For example, the most common use for dates in an email program is viewing the most recent messages. In this context, sorting undated messages as newer than everything else would clog up the view, so undated messages get sorted as if they were infinitely old. On the other hand, if lack of a date represents an incompletely-entered ...


2

Something relevant for choosing data format : The source of the user's input: If you know the source from user's input is formatted in some way you will want to maintain that format, because you don't want the user to make unnecessary mental conversions. Examples of this are expiration days in credit cards or invoices (at least in my country). If there're ...


1

During my work, I found that most people (including me) like single fields together with a format helper label (_____ DD/MM/YYYY) best. It is easy and fast to type and everyone should get the formatting hint. Plus, it's easy to evaluate and work with afterwards in your program. Bonus: Most mobile devices have the common separators (/,.) present on the ...


1

I have zero experience of iOS listener events (if that is what they are called). This is the way I would deal with this (if I have understood the context properly). So your application requires the user to be above a certain age. Say 13, you would expect the user to enter in the year field a value equal to or less than 2002. If this is your goal showing ...


1

The Question's Title (repeated in the body too) is : Should UTC timestamps include day of the week or not? The answer is "it depends": If humans don't need to know the Day-of-Week for a timestamp, then No. If humans do need to know the day-of-week for the timestamp, but they can have the date processed for them order to determine the day-of-week, ...


1

We face that ALL the time at work (sales orders, etc...). The newest items default to the top and the dateless items are placed at the bottom (under the oldest date). To find them the user has to select ascending order to place them at the top. Users don't have the slightest problem with them.


1

In OS X Finder "No Date" items are shown last (after the oldest), there is no sorting by ascending order there, but I personally would still keep it at the bottom of the list in ascending order, too.


1

I would consider using the same convention that gmail and many other email programs use: Bold for new (or unread), regular with gray background for old (or read). In your case you could use bold for upcoming, regular with gray bg for overdue. There's an excellent answer on stackexchange demonstrating this pattern.


1

This is a question of the "time responsibility" of the system. If you shift left, i.e. a user is responsible for the time tracking, it means: user uses "internal" calendar (in his/her mind) user has full control over labeling the search results user sets time-related labels to the search results, according to internal calendar user can be ...


1

If the user selects today from the Date dropdown, “today” date appears in the Start Date field. Other selections from the Date dropdown can be e.g. Last week, Last month etc. After selection start and end date are populated automatically. Custom dates (as shown in the mockup) can be selected either by clicking the calendar either by typing in the fields. ...


1

I would recommend keeping it simple where you just provide a date value and provide an option to edit it. This informs the user that he can edit the current value and when not editing this is the selected value download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Facebook uses this approach where it shows the current setting and ...


1

For me, I think it'd be best to ask for the date of interest, then select the version based on that. I've done a lot of work on bitemporal databases and found this to be a good approach, although of course it depends on your user's expectations.


1

Why not use both of those solutions? Facebook does this by how relevant the time is to you such as: A post that was put up today will show: But once the post becomes older, it will do this: So in your case, you could use both depending on how relevant it is. If the due date is a month from now you can go into details: "Do the dishes - Monday, ...


1

If I set a date to be Monday the 1st of September 2014 at 12:59 PM, will this actually be handled as tuesday very early morning? No, this would be treated as Monday afternoon, just before 1pm. Early morning on Tuesday would be Tuesday 12:59am in 12-hour format or 00:59 in 24-hour format. And while it's true that people might also describe that as ...


1

That actually depends on the context. Imagine you're booking a flight and it says Saturday, 2am on the tickets. There's hardly any doubt that it's the night Fri-Sat and not the next night. It's a whole different thing if you're e.g. providing the running order of a music festival. Saturday, 2am there, is almost always technically Sunday, 2am, but this isn't ...



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