New answers tagged

1

As others have said, it depends on what you want to accomplish. You specifically highlight the "white noise" effect due to having so many overlapping nodes and edges in your 3D force layout, so I'll focus on that. I recommend using a different layout. Force-directed layouts tend to have high node density toward the middle, and in 3D that means the dense ...


0

Department stores change floor and fixing colours to subtly change the mood of a shopper, for example when transitioning from clothing to a food department. So I agree in principal, executed with the right subtleties your concept could work. Without seeing the project, maybe keep core background colours so as not to completely throw the users eye… but change ...


2

No references to offer, sorry. Only my opinion based on experience: An empty table tells the user that the current page could possibly have some relevant info (they can deduce the kind of info and layout from column headers). Rule of thumb I apply (in enterprise environment): empty table is useful if the user can do something on the same page to ...


0

If you want to get something up and running quickly, include a win/loss percentage to quickly size up the competition.


3

If you want to visualize just the total wins and losses any simple chart or table will do. If you want to visualize the progress throughout the season though, what you have is similar to Edward Tufte's sparklines visualizing wins and losses using simple icons. The stars work ok, but it takes a bit more work to distinguish between wins and losses. Here ...


0

You can use green color for the wins and red color for the losses. I think users are most accustomed to this pattern. You can also use win percentage after the number of games has reached certain ammount.


0

How about a use of trophies displaying the number of wins and losses?


2

I think one needs to address the question of what is being conveyed through the graph. If you want to point to certain interesting observations, marking them, or generating separate graphs to highlight the same might be one way to catch the attention. While such graphs look visually appealing, the process of generating insights might prove to be ...


6

Oooh, pretty. Yeah, well, hairballs (this kind of huge graphs you have shown) are pretty much useless because unreadable. Genomicists and bioinformaticians have discovered this early in the days because their datasets are big enough to demonstrate the issue. And no, adding 3D will not help the cause. The solution for hairballs are hive plots. Also ...


2

Disclaimer: Very random ideas from a non-specialist What would you recommend to use to avoid data overload with large graphs? I would look at successful visualizations of large graphs. Here's a few: http://internet-map.net/: it's easy to see the central points and the clusters. Also easy to see individual points. ...


0

For this case I suggest to make in-place editor, instead of a drawer and display a button on rollover to view details. Something like this:


1

You are correct that star ratings are limited, but they are still useful as a rough guide of quality. On Amazon, I can tell which products I should probably avoid, and which are worth investigating more from the number of stars. On IMDB, I can tell whether a movie is likely to be broadly good or terrible. It's true that I can't gather more fine-grained ...


0

Why stars in amazon : In amazon it's just a way to assure the user whether the product is god or bad. A star rating on the higher side ( say above 3 with a large number of ratings ) can give a belief to the user that the item has been used by many people and is decent enough to use. One person's 3 and other person's 3 might be different , but still they ...


3

Your choices beyond the existing pan/zooming on the display could be to introduce a local focus+context lens around the mouse pointer, to unclutter/expand the current area of interest. However with the size of datasets you're mentioning you might need to consider aggregating and/or filtering on the data itself - a million node graph on a million-pixel ...


0

Cramming 3 variables into the map is really not the best solution — it will most likely not be readable. This being said, it can still be done. You could combine a bivariate map from Harshit's answer with this, adding a third dimension for one of the variables.


0

Yes its a good idea to right align them. The reasons being:- Its an established accounting practice that all numeric values should be right aligned, for simple reasons as better readability and less room for human error - so its best to follow them If there are decimals then its more easy to read if they are right aligned My right aligning them it will ...


0

It is good UX for the values to be aligned in the way that works best, and you need to take into consideration a number of factors (some of which I have listed here): Basic of numerical value (integers or decimals) Data type of numerical value and conventions (e.g. $, date, time) Alignment with the rest of the fields Length of the numerical value Behaviour ...


7

For editing values in a text field, it depends where you edit them, and what other fields are in its context: if the layout stays data-table-like, and the cell simply becomes editable, then I agree with @Erisu's answer, to conform to excel-like solution. if the text field is in a form, it is better to be consistent across fields, to prevent user having to ...


1

Managing Readability As you rightly pointed out, the alignment rule works best when the data is in a list/tabular format. Basically when the user will have to scan related vertically. It is the context around the data that defines the alignment. If the context remains the same then do retain the same alignment. If it is a mixed data, like a form, ...


0

If I understood you correctly , This is so called Data Justification. You need to justify the data according to its content. There two types of content numeric data and textual data. For Textual Data it is a good UX that you do left justification , For Numeric Data , it is a good UX that you do right justification. In this case data comparisons will be ...


0

No, for two main reasons 1) Difficult to update - It becomes extremely painful to update the field on a mobile device (it is not a piece of cake on desktops either, though more manageable ) since then your fingers will have to tap towards the end of the textbox right-border, which is certainly painful thing to do every time. 2) Misaligned form - If your ...


5

Looking at Excel as an example, when a cell becomes a numeric value, the numbers are right aligned. When double clicking into the cell to edit, they maintain the content right aligned. As people are accustom to Excel, it might be sound to follow the same flow?


1

If you use a modal dialog, you'll break the focus of the user. This is a good thing in some contexts, an excessive one in others. It takes time for users to switch their attention to the new, disruptive window, which is likely to partly cover the UI elements on which the user was focusing. It also makes it more costly to just cancel the edit, so to speak. ...



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