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And yet there are times when ALL the columns are necessary - and yet there are too many to fit the available space. I've faced that problem. Hiding columns doesn't work as the data is necessary. In one example I partially solved the problem by reducing the text in some of the columns. For example the user scans the columns to know which competitor (8 ...


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Or maybe you can refresh the results every 5 or 10 new items instead of for each one?


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UPDATE: Ok now that I've seen some "in action". I really recommend to go for a fixed area for the tool tip texts! The user sees its getting more and more (and probably will actually wait for all of it to load -- check this!). Or tries to already click on a label. Then somewhere opens a fixed location with the text. User reads it, when she's done looking back ...


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What about radar charts? One application of radar charts is the control of quality improvement to display the performance metrics of any ongoing program. They are also being used in sports to chart players' strengths and weaknesses, where they are usually called spider charts. Here's a nice example.


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This is a pretty difficult question to answer, so I think the best thing is to give you some ideas to think about. The process of designing interfaces for the purpose of data visualization is a whole subject area in itself, although you'll find plenty of good areas to start with from the likes of Edward Tufte and Stephen Few. So some areas you want to ...


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The first problem is to show the course of a single day in a form the reader can easily grasp; the second is to relate your data series to this picture. Although "time of day" is a simple one-dimensional parameter, we associate a structure with it (workday, evening, lunchtime etc.) which can cause a certain dissonance when we see it plotted in linear form ...


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Keep it simple, and as conventional as possible. Rectangular charts are the most common. Label the axes and pay attention to typography. Maybe use military time. Maybe emphasize (darken) the hour lines on the points of the clock (12, 3, 6, 9...). There's tons of existing charts of this nature out there, I'd spend some time exploring them to glean some ...


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I'm sorry, but making selections in order before submission seams so nineties! This was how the web and ERP:s worked back in the days. You should at each single selection filter results returned accordingly and not have your user play guessing game. Now go back to your development team and tell them they need to be coding for real time, right now!


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I would create the Any category as you did, and put a "Other" category as the last item of the category. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups For a user it feels weird selecting "Unknown" while selecting "Other" feels comfortable (this is a convention shared among many UIs). I know the data is unknown and that you ...


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A few thoughts: Time-multiplex the data. You can cycle through the sets of statistics, displaying each set for about 10 seconds. That way, you can use the entire screen to show only one set. This is only good if it’s not particularly important for users to see every statistic all the time (e.g., the TV is intended to provide an occasional motivation boost ...


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Generally speaking, there are 3 main types of data analysis- comparison, transition and composition. For comparisons, Bar and Column charts are the best. For transitions, Line and Area charts work well. For compositions, Pie charts work well. This infographic further explains when to use which chart: ...


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If I understand correctly, when pressing "show codes" you'll only see the codes associated with that particular user. Therefor, displaying the name of the user is superfluous. Showing the codes in a table and then showing the codes again in a textfield for the second time is superfluous too. My suggestion would be for a row of input fields for every code. ...


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The second option, with a clear but not abrupt transition is better because it makes it obvious the change is happening, rather than forcing users to consciously think about what they've done and what the result of their changes will be. One way to get the message across would be to animate your change, as seen in this example which uses the ZingChart ...



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