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Give the user some sense of control Here are some UX ideas that give the sense of control to the user (as opposed to "full automation"): break down the tasks by categories, so that the user sends emails in batches by type; as each series of emails is triggered, suggest to open a preview of the corresponding list (a simple, long, cleanly-formatted list ...


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To me a sunburst, hiveplot or a sankey diagram seem better options, depending on the context of the data. Hiveplot shows all data layers without the liability of pie-chart-like design that makes all four categories look like 25% each. Sunburst is great for displaying breakdowns of each part, and this can be priceless in displaying sub-flows. ...


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Establish a process for "hanging" check-outs to keep the system running Don't check in data automatically — that would be equal to publishing "work in progress." However, you could certainly check in the original data after a period of inactivity. Establish a certain threshold for inactive check-outs — if after some time the user doesn't go back to his ...


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Thinks will go wrong; users will go on holiday; computers with crush; users will die (or just get a new job). Therefore anther user MUST be able to do their work when an item is left checked out. So there must be a way to get a checkout undone. This could be by having an “admin” user with the power to undo checkouts, or by allow any user to undo a ...


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From a technical standpoint, you'd use javascript: onbeforeunload When they close the window, first prompt them to check in (or discard) their checkout. From a UX standpoint, I'd strongly argue that you never check in automatically. Check in should always be a user-triggered event. There's just no way to know if they forgot vs. they abandoned it. If you ...


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Leaving it checked out to the user sounds an acceptable solution if there may be a reason they left it checked out. One option could be to give any user the ability to unlock files but stress that the user that has it checked out would lose any changes by doing so. Another option would be for users to flag that they want something unlocked, this then ...


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I wouldn't bother showing anything until they have performed some sort of search. it may be possible to grab just the dealer names or some other useful bit of information from the database without taking the whole lot. This would allow an 'autocomplete' type function but wouldn't have the weight (and wait) of the full database download. Then you only need to ...


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I definitely do not recommend B. As Ville Niemi states, you should always only show the useful bits. Besides, Facebook's only showing the placeholders when it's loading content (which should take about 1-2 seconds). Browsing What I, as a web developer/designer, do is show a fixed number of entries first, 5 to 10, and use a button to trigger the ...


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Neither the random nor fake preview seems useful. Content that is not useful should not be developed. It is waste of resources for both developer and user. Development time spent on low value work is not available for high value work. Effort users spend parsing and comprehending low value content is not available for actual work. Instead you should go back ...



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