Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

In terms of order, the primary (in terms of user association) identifier for the data row should always be on the left in a left to right language localization. Note that if you have a unique ID for each item, this may not be appropriate if it's not what a user themselves would primarily associate with that item, or the main feature they would generally ...


1

I propose you do this like on YouTube (and the same solution is proposed in the accepted answer of the question you link to) when there is a table with videos you uploaded. There are some actions, like "Delete", "Publish", "Edit" etc. for each video. The Table has one more column allowing selecting a video (this is typical checkbox). You can select multiple ...


7

3 small action buttons on the left-hand side of each row With a LTR languages, one can assume users will first inspect the row (starting from the left) and only then decide to take action. So placing the buttons on the left side is somewhat counter-flow. 3 small action buttons on the right-hand side of each row Pros: Buttons are easily ...


1

I think it depends on the main purpose of that table; if Update/Delete, put it first else put it last. In most cases though, you probably first want to identify what you want to edit/delete; in that case putting it at the left side forms clutter and is better to replace it with a checkbox and to than put the inline controls at the right side instead. Also ...


0

Personally, I think your main issue is to use a table, which complicates things and provides an affordance that collides with what you want to achieve. Think about this: I see your categories list, and see there are 10 per page. Great. Now, I expand your category... and now I see subcategories but some of the categories I was seeing disappeared! This is a ...


1

You are right that a good option would be to eliminate the overall parent/child relationship from the results table. Users don't 'search' for a category, they browse it; meaning a user would select Computer Hardware from some sort of category listing and then browse its children for further refinement. Both Amazon and PCPartpicker handle their content in ...


0

I think an easier way to look at the problem is by thinking about the rows as "denormalized" by including the category as part of the name or another column for each "child row". And when the user searches for something then include both the name and the category in the search. So if the search string matches a category then it would match all items ...


0

I dont think one big list is the way to go. Show all the parent categories as big tappable boxes. Let user drill down. It will be easier to find what they are looking for that way vs having to scroll through a big list. For search, show all entries that match. In each entry you can show a clickable hierarchy of its parents.



Top 50 recent answers are included