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Give the user some sense of control Here are some UX ideas that give the sense of control to the user (as opposed to "full automation"): break down the tasks by categories, so that the user sends emails in batches by type; as each series of emails is triggered, suggest to open a preview of the corresponding list (a simple, long, cleanly-formatted list ...


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You don't mention whether you've looked at the working examples from third-party providers. For example: work your way down the left menu on this Telerik page. work your way down the left menu on this DevExpress page. These sites tend to cater more to developers, not UX practitioners, so you may find it a bit of a challenge. That's why you might want to ...


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Personally I think you may be over-engineering this as based on your question it seems you are concerned about indicating a data-point is clickable and user not knowing the information they will receive when clicking on that data-point. Short answer for this question is style them as links (as essentially that's what they are). Based on the premise of the ...


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A table like this on a cellular phone that is not a phablet or tablet is difficult to read no matter how you choose to indicate a link; A clear message on top could do it but this would fail the guideline that if you need instructions its not an easy to use interface. You could also use any type of tutorial or message here and fall in the same case. If the ...


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This might be a good application of animations. What if on pageload a finger-cursor icon briefly appears and moves in a curve, diagonally over the cells. As the finger passes over each cell, that cell grows/shrinks, or a drop shadow fades in/out, or whatever other state you might use on mouseover to indicate clickablity on desktop. If the animation is ...


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I suppose this is a web page that can be seen even from the mobile. Normally a user is used in furniture that all you see is clickable. In a table like this that we are showing I believe that the addition of any icon would make the interface suffered heavy. But you have instead tried to tackle the problem differently? If you said explicitly it with a ...


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There's a very good article on UXMatters about filtering information in tables. Although old, it still makes a lot of sense. A few options have been considered, like data filters above a table: filters to the left of the data or tabular format in case the number of filters is low There's also a good discussion about consistent availability and ...


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I find the search box more intuitive for search. However, the text boxes provide a way of advanced filtering. So, the question is - do you want your users to search or filter? If you want both, you may consider the following intermediate solution, Amazon is using the same. Your search box searching all columns by default but the user has the option to ...


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Actually your 1st option is a Filter, while 2nd one is rather a Search. They are just different tools. And both tools are useful. But dealing with large and complex datasets, I'm for 1st option. Per field filters provide more clear mental model. Table explicitly presents the data in highly structured view, which affects user's mental model. They think on ...


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For me the only reason to avoid the single search (2nd option) would be to have several columns with similar content, thus leading to an inefficient search. If that's not the case I would totally go with the single search: There's only 1 entry point for search, thus less cognitive load. The users only have to think what to search, not where to search ...



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