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31

Well, I guess there is a maximum number of miles someone can travel in a year, since there are a finite number of seconds in year, and one cannot exceed the speed of light. A more practical limit may be 1000 miles every three days, which would be about 100,000 miles in a year. I suggest using a normal slider but with a logarithmic scale. i.e. equal spaced ...


29

I've always been enamored at the way the iOS quicktime application works when viewing MP3s in Safari, and I think this method can be adapted for your use. We can stay with a normal slider bar - perhaps the handle could be changed from the normal circle to show a difference. We can add tick marks to the bar and numbers that change on either end. Then, ...


21

One interesting solution that hasn't been proposed yet is a sort of "odometer" that the users could set to the desired number. This would have the benefits of preventing users from having to scroll through smaller numbers to get to larger ones, allowing users to be as precise as they wish, and being as simple as plain text entry without messing with a ...


7

I suggest you replace the slider with a dial by removing the thumb indicator and adding arrowheads on either side so it looks something like this: I use a program at work that uses a similar dial to control frequency during an online simulation, and I've never seen anyone get confused with it. Here's the interface:


7

Reading @Henrik Ekblom's comment about circular controls reminded me of how the Timer app works on Android phones (image below is from the Timely app). You can add as many minutes/hours to the timer as needed by continuing to drag the cursor in a circle around the clock. Obviously the circular format works a lot better for clock-like functions, and it could ...


4

It seems like your users need something that first selects a less detailed milage area, with big steps. When that area is selected it's time to fine tune. One way of doing that could be something like my image below shows. As soon as the user clicks and drags in the span control (A), the red marker follows and a more fine tuned area (B) shows up. The user ...


4

Hear those crickets? That’s the sound of no guidelines for dense data presentations for any design language. There has been a need for such guidelines since GUIs first arrived, but there aren’t any I know of. For what it’s worth, I’ve been developing my own approach for dense alpha-numeric GUI presentations over the years, which I described at Coded, ...


3

EDIT Whatever number the user enters into the text box, that is the middle value of the slider. They can tweak that number by sliding left (for less miles) or right (more miles). How much distance to place between the middle number and the upper and lower ranges is up to you. In your case, there is a maximum number. 1 Year is 365 Days or 8,760 Hours ...


3

I like your general idea, but it seems that your users are not getting the metaphor. Which leaves you with two options: Make it very skueoumorphic, hoping that they will get the hint. Instead of using a slider, use something which looks like a physical lever that can be pushed more or less to the left (or right), and beside it a spinning number display ...


3

I might be missing something (you might have been referring to this when you said "standard +/- values"), but this seems like the perfect use case for a spinner: The design of the spinner is such that "the appearance of the spinner at a given time does not represent the quantity of the associated value" (Wikipedia). Thus, you wouldn't run into the problem ...


3

It sounds like your customer is, like everyone else I know in finance, very much hooked on Excel. It might seem horribly cluttered to you, but this person is likely used to working with giant workbooks containing lots of sheets (accessed by tabs). They rarely want to learn a new workflow, so don't break your head trying to force other solutions on them. ...


2

I think you need to browse PC Settings of any Windows 8 PC and see what they did there. It's not immediate obvious, but they hide a lot of Windows 7 settings, focusing on most used settings. Take the workflow of changing images as an example, and work your way from there. These navigation elements, is a starting point!


2

@MichaelZuschlag hits the nail on the head: there are no matching guidelines for metro, and at least I've never seen any (platform-wide) for any platform. At first look, the intent of the UI formerly known as Metro is at odds dense UI. A "dense" screen would have to be broken up into detail pages (see Navigation guidelines). Your first screen would have ...


2

My answer is to first of all avoid have such data heavy applications. Can your functions be separated into a flow? Or do all these interactive elements need to be presented at the same time? Can you separate the administrative UI and the presentative UI? I would focus my work on trying to reduce the number of items per page, since there's only so much you ...


2

Put a logarithmic scale on the slider. Larger values rarely need to be precise, so you can put a quite large upper limit on it. Take the largest conceivable value for this input, add 50%. In response to the system wanting volume rather than substance, I will restate what I said in the above paragraph. The question wants a scrubber/slider-style control, ...


1

I propose that you display (1) a position indicator (displaying a number of miles, for instance) and (2) a "speed knob" (a thumb on a slider). Let's suppose that the speed knob position goes from -1 to 1. Then when it's in position x, you increase, once per tick of some clock (e.g., once every 60th of a second) the position indicator by an amount ...


1

Hopefully I understand how you've implemented your "thumbwheel" concept so that I'm not simply rehashing the same idea, but the following concept comes based largely on what you've already laid out. At the moment, the way that you've designed the thumbwheel means that to get through large values (such as when adding 10,000 miles), you would need to repeat ...


1

One idea, if applicable based on your data set and architecture, could be to have : one single quick search field using predictive typing and live refresh of search results. Your users could then start typing, say, "repl 113" and the predictive typing would suggest "replenishment" as they type the "l" (in real time during typing, so difficult to render ...


1

Here are my suggestions: if a gene is expressed in all cells of a specific organ, the researcher would have to type lots of cell types for each organ (or will enter something nonsensical like "all" - we accept the creation of new cell types by users) You can use: a Select all button to select all the cell types (but it may display lots of checkboxes in ...


1

Some suggestions to make input more easy and less error prone on a tablet: place – and + signs into the input control and increase responsive area increase space between controls to eliminate missing while tapping To reduce information overload you could try accordion-style navigation with folding sections.


1

You can certainly exchange the busy and repetitive data entry parts of each row for a single data entry area locked to the top or bottom of the pane so that you can make those controls bigger. Then you just need to select a row in order to edit the values in the dedicated area.



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