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11

Problem I think there are several usability problems in current design. Wide single line input limits the way that note could be expressed (no paragraphs, no breaks) and makes the reading much harder. Interaction style is non-convenient, as note-taking area is disjoined from appropriate order. This creates jump-and-search behavior while taking a note, ...


6

There are too many decisions to make at the same time on this. You should use JavaScript to progressively invalidate later choices, but maybe not in the way you were thinking. In a case like this, I would try to break it into steps and auto generate a much narrower form from the first choice. You can remove any illegal combination when you display the new ...


6

You normally design form fields to match the expected input. Do you have a maximum character count for this field? If so, you can display a countdown, decrementing that number as the user types, to provide them with real-time guidance on how wordy they are allowed to be, and also to circumvent the awkward flow of accepting their typing and then erroring out ...


5

You could use your described system (hiding every entered character after input) but still showing every special symbol as in dots, slashes, underscores etc. giving the user the opportunity to check the length before and after those characters. Further I think it would be ok to show the TLD. Additionally - since you are using a touch screen - you could let ...


4

It seems that there are some conflicting views when deciding to use a bold field input label or not. “In this layout [with labels above the input fields], it’s advisable to use bold fonts for input field labels. This increases their visual weight and brings them to the foreground of the layout.”—Luke Wroblewski. However, in an eye tracking study ...


4

Without understanding what the actual data is it's tough to recommend how to collapse but chances are users don't need to look at all of these columns at the same time. In fact since there is a scroll right now they can't look at them at the same time so you could easily swap out the scrolling interaction with the ability to collapse columns. So, I'd do ...


4

Hear those crickets? That’s the sound of no guidelines for dense data presentations for any design language. There has been a need for such guidelines since GUIs first arrived, but there aren’t any I know of. For what it’s worth, I’ve been developing my own approach for dense alpha-numeric GUI presentations over the years, which I described at Coded, ...


4

Since you have acknowledged that users have an email address that they would prefer you to use, just ask them for that preferred channel. Don't try and second-guess whether it's a daytime/work/home/throwaway address: use the address they nominate. That is, the "most appropriate classification" is simply Preferred.


3

how about using a data-entry tree like this http://www.csprousers.org/help/html/data_entry_tree.htm and this http://responsibility.motorola.com/web_help/scriba_12b_-_Remove_this_leaf.png http://responsibility.motorola.com/web_help/Scriba_XLM_Tools_Training/Scriba_-_Material_Data_Entry_for_Complex_Products.htm But this will again depend upon how much data ...


3

As a user, in most cases I don't trust parser that reads the sentence in such human language format. Most events I enter are appointments. Appointments are always important for me, so I always want to be 100% sure that it was added correctly. So if an application allows me to input my appointment like this, I completely ignore this feature and try to find a ...


3

Here's an option: You could temporarily make the text box bigger. While active, you would increase the size of the text-box, turning it into a bigger area. Here's a quick mockup. Before overflow happens: When overflow happens: When a field has too much text: Or perhaps a bit more slick: Things of note: To make sure other elements in your design ...


3

The biggest problem I see with your current layout is the separation of content. It's very difficult to see the difference between your first time request to the one below it other than the repeating information. This will be even more difficult when viewed in a mobile browser. For the mobile version, I recommend separating the mobile view into two ...


2

Horizontal scrolling is not OK when displaying data. Instead you need to implement data visualisation that reveals more the wider the viewport, and less the narrower the viewport. Implement drill-down techniques, responsive web design and adjust font sizes, white spaces, margins, paddings and borders to make your data understandable in any case. To do this ...


2

Google Calendar uses a similar input field and I'm quite fond of it. Like Apple's Calendar, it shows a suggestion for how to input a value into it, making it fairly accessible to users. The difficulty with implementing one though is putting enough intelligence into the parsing that it can accept the vast majority of options and formats a user may try.


2

As there are a lot of data, it's important to minimize user's cognitive load. The data should be clearly structured in a meaningful way and manual input should be minimized (recall over remember principle). To support those requirements, you could: Develop templates for the typical cases. To mantain flexibility, allow user to add or remove data fields ...


2

I think you need to browse PC Settings of any Windows 8 PC and see what they did there. It's not immediate obvious, but they hide a lot of Windows 7 settings, focusing on most used settings. Take the workflow of changing images as an example, and work your way from there. These navigation elements, is a starting point!


2

@MichaelZuschlag hits the nail on the head: there are no matching guidelines for metro, and at least I've never seen any (platform-wide) for any platform. At first look, the intent of the UI formerly known as Metro is at odds dense UI. A "dense" screen would have to be broken up into detail pages (see Navigation guidelines). Your first screen would have ...


2

My answer is to first of all avoid have such data heavy applications. Can your functions be separated into a flow? Or do all these interactive elements need to be presented at the same time? Can you separate the administrative UI and the presentative UI? I would focus my work on trying to reduce the number of items per page, since there's only so much you ...


1

Here are my suggestions: if a gene is expressed in all cells of a specific organ, the researcher would have to type lots of cell types for each organ (or will enter something nonsensical like "all" - we accept the creation of new cell types by users) You can use: a Select all button to select all the cell types (but it may display lots of checkboxes in ...


1

You can certainly exchange the busy and repetitive data entry parts of each row for a single data entry area locked to the top or bottom of the pane so that you can make those controls bigger. Then you just need to select a row in order to edit the values in the dedicated area.


1

I believe most any UI designer would tell you that trying to give specific advice for a solution is nearly impossible where we don't know the context and intent. For example, the engagement factor is critical, if the interface is transactional and user is pre-registration, the interface is entirely different from a UI where the user is motivated and ...


1

I'd rather have a defined workflow for defining the components one after another, with the ability to pause and resume the process in between, and returning to an overview page in between. The overview describes the next required step (if no steps remain, "Mark entry as complete") optional steps (e.g. "Add special-purpose hardware") may offer to return to ...


1

I think, the following cite from UsabilityPost is applicable to your case: This might sound banal, but there are often cases where blindly following best practices and design theory slowly pulls you off the right track, so that you end up designing something for the sake of a good design — whatever that is — rather than for actual use. Any ...


1

Side-scrolling a Table is Fine There’s nothing wrong with side (horizontal) scrolling of tables. Users of Excel do it all the time. You just need to have fixed (non-side-scrolling) row headers to identify the rows no matter where the user has scrolled in the table. That is, the table should by default have “frozen panes,” to use Excel’s term. Like maps, ...


1

I don't particularly see the point of increasing font size unless it is a heading or something. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/cc872782.aspx When possible, format the labels using bold text. Otherwise, put the labels in quotation marks only if required to prevent confusion. ...



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