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31

Well, I guess there is a maximum number of miles someone can travel in a year, since there are a finite number of seconds in year, and one cannot exceed the speed of light. A more practical limit may be 1000 miles every three days, which would be about 100,000 miles in a year. I suggest using a normal slider but with a logarithmic scale. i.e. equal spaced ...


30

I've always been enamored at the way the iOS quicktime application works when viewing MP3s in Safari, and I think this method can be adapted for your use. We can stay with a normal slider bar - perhaps the handle could be changed from the normal circle to show a difference. We can add tick marks to the bar and numbers that change on either end. Then, ...


21

One interesting solution that hasn't been proposed yet is a sort of "odometer" that the users could set to the desired number. This would have the benefits of preventing users from having to scroll through smaller numbers to get to larger ones, allowing users to be as precise as they wish, and being as simple as plain text entry without messing with a ...


7

I suggest you replace the slider with a dial by removing the thumb indicator and adding arrowheads on either side so it looks something like this: I use a program at work that uses a similar dial to control frequency during an online simulation, and I've never seen anyone get confused with it. Here's the interface:


7

Reading @Henrik Ekblom's comment about circular controls reminded me of how the Timer app works on Android phones (image below is from the Timely app). You can add as many minutes/hours to the timer as needed by continuing to drag the cursor in a circle around the clock. Obviously the circular format works a lot better for clock-like functions, and it could ...


6

User experience is different from data design Developers who move into UX often forget this important perspective change. Users don't think in terms of CRUD. They usually think in terms of what they want to get done. Some examples: For a micro blog, an author might want to create, update, and delete posts from the same convenient interface. For a ...


5

I would describe this situation as: dynamic nested workflows. Dynamic because you cannot tell ahead of time how deeply nested the workflow will be (user may not create any new objects, or may create multiple carriers and persons). Nested because the workflows for creating a carrier and then a person are nested within each other. The dynamic nesting ...


5

Good question, but the Wolfram reference is terribly incorrect. The use of the period . in user interfaces is almost universal nowadays, and I would advise against trying to overload the comma. The spread of the decimal point is a pretty interesting case on the effects of globalization and technology. In this case, the broad standardization of global ...


4

I might be missing something (you might have been referring to this when you said "standard +/- values"), but this seems like the perfect use case for a spinner: The design of the spinner is such that "the appearance of the spinner at a given time does not represent the quantity of the associated value" (Wikipedia). Thus, you wouldn't run into the problem ...


4

It sounds like your customer is, like everyone else I know in finance, very much hooked on Excel. It might seem horribly cluttered to you, but this person is likely used to working with giant workbooks containing lots of sheets (accessed by tabs). They rarely want to learn a new workflow, so don't break your head trying to force other solutions on them. ...


4

It seems like your users need something that first selects a less detailed milage area, with big steps. When that area is selected it's time to fine tune. One way of doing that could be something like my image below shows. As soon as the user clicks and drags in the span control (A), the red marker follows and a more fine tuned area (B) shows up. The user ...


3

Three dependent values got me thinking about electricity and the rules of thumb for calculating power, current and voltage or current, voltage and resistance. In this Ohm's law calculator (at the end of the page) user has to enter two and only two values and click "Calculate" to get the third one. It's easy to click reset and to enter new values but if the ...


3

Use a non-destructive operation A merge company transaction is both complex and possibly destructive. A delete company operation, on the other hand, is destructive but not complex at all. You would need to test this solution with users but the following solution should have everything you're looking for broken down into a few simple and non-destructive ...


3

I like your general idea, but it seems that your users are not getting the metaphor. Which leaves you with two options: Make it very skueoumorphic, hoping that they will get the hint. Instead of using a slider, use something which looks like a physical lever that can be pushed more or less to the left (or right), and beside it a spinning number display ...


3

EDIT Whatever number the user enters into the text box, that is the middle value of the slider. They can tweak that number by sliding left (for less miles) or right (more miles). How much distance to place between the middle number and the upper and lower ranges is up to you. In your case, there is a maximum number. 1 Year is 365 Days or 8,760 Hours ...


2

We normally don't critique specific designs here because it's too specific to be of use for other people. But, speaking as a general rule of thumb, if the user will be performing essentially the same action, it's best to use the same/similar view. I'm referring to the Add and Edit. When you add an Item, you probably want to deal with its Options too. There ...


2

Pop up errors Drawbacks: The pop-up goes away in order to correct the form => I have to remember the errors. Their just plain data, "unlinked" with the particular error source => I have to locate the source of the errors if I can remember them. (unless you also want to color the input or showing some other clue, but I will harder anyway compared with ...


2

Ok, I try to provide an answer in hope that it will encourage an expert to jump in, in case I tell nonsense. First of all I think the answer to your general question Should software attempt to interpret input such as 3,14 correctly? can only be unambiguously answered with a firm "it depends". I think the keyword in my above comment "every properly ...


2

Put a logarithmic scale on the slider. Larger values rarely need to be precise, so you can put a quite large upper limit on it. Take the largest conceivable value for this input, add 50%. In response to the system wanting volume rather than substance, I will restate what I said in the above paragraph. The question wants a scrubber/slider-style control, ...


2

From a visual point of view, 2 sizes is OK, different sizes for input fields is very confusing, and the same applies if you expect to input 2 characters and have room for 40. The user will wonder if they need to add something else in most cases, so visual hinting plays a role. Of course, like Chris commented, you need to keep in mind that under a certain ...


2

At least one example is in spreadsheets. Both Excel and Google Docs have Enter move to the next row and Tab move to the next column. If your the end user is familiar with certain types of data entry, using Enter may be more familiar to them. For example see: This is a fake example, but many financial documents are set up to be entered a single column at a ...


1

It seems to me that to make a family tree you'd want to make a visual representation of it, and offer simple options like an input box in specific areas, all of which relate to the user. For example, everyone has two parents so they should have two parent fields. Then they each must have two parents, ad infinitum. Siblings and children, as well as cousins ...


1

Design for the primary use case, then take care of secondaries I would guess that most users will know what they want to calculate, so they will come in, fill out two fields, then calculate the third. So this is the primary use case. Sometimes, users will change their minds or want to explore other variations, so they will switch fields or recalculate. ...


1

I propose that you display (1) a position indicator (displaying a number of miles, for instance) and (2) a "speed knob" (a thumb on a slider). Let's suppose that the speed knob position goes from -1 to 1. Then when it's in position x, you increase, once per tick of some clock (e.g., once every 60th of a second) the position indicator by an amount ...


1

As per your edit, I am assuming InPage rather than InLine. I think it depends on the length of your form. I have seen many times where Users have to click the Submit button way down at the bottom, the In Page validation kicks in but Users are not scrolled back up to the inpage validation message. So they have no idea why the form is not submitting! Either ...


1

How about showing the values for other departments under the editable value for your own department? (A system admin would need to specify which departments each user could see beyond their own.)


1

Hopefully I understand how you've implemented your "thumbwheel" concept so that I'm not simply rehashing the same idea, but the following concept comes based largely on what you've already laid out. At the moment, the way that you've designed the thumbwheel means that to get through large values (such as when adding 10,000 miles), you would need to repeat ...


1

One idea, if applicable based on your data set and architecture, could be to have : one single quick search field using predictive typing and live refresh of search results. Your users could then start typing, say, "repl 113" and the predictive typing would suggest "replenishment" as they type the "l" (in real time during typing, so difficult to render ...



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