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31

Well, I guess there is a maximum number of miles someone can travel in a year, since there are a finite number of seconds in year, and one cannot exceed the speed of light. A more practical limit may be 1000 miles every three days, which would be about 100,000 miles in a year. I suggest using a normal slider but with a logarithmic scale. i.e. equal spaced ...


29

I've always been enamored at the way the iOS quicktime application works when viewing MP3s in Safari, and I think this method can be adapted for your use. We can stay with a normal slider bar - perhaps the handle could be changed from the normal circle to show a difference. We can add tick marks to the bar and numbers that change on either end. Then, ...


21

One interesting solution that hasn't been proposed yet is a sort of "odometer" that the users could set to the desired number. This would have the benefits of preventing users from having to scroll through smaller numbers to get to larger ones, allowing users to be as precise as they wish, and being as simple as plain text entry without messing with a ...


12

I think a much easier solution for the end user, since you say the list of choices is the same for every row, is to have the table with the last column empty, and then a separate list somewhere on the page, near the table- not a dropdown but a list with all choices visible at a glance - where clicking a name will add it to the row automatically. This way, ...


11

A general principle for power users is that they appreciate efficiency and can learn almost any control you give them. This is fantastic from your point of view because it means you can focus your interface design on speed optimisations and cut a lot of distracting fluff. Let's break down your users' actual workflow for a moment. Check through form, ...


11

Problem I think there are several usability problems in current design. Wide single line input limits the way that note could be expressed (no paragraphs, no breaks) and makes the reading much harder. Interaction style is non-convenient, as note-taking area is disjoined from appropriate order. This creates jump-and-search behavior while taking a note, ...


7

Reading @Henrik Ekblom's comment about circular controls reminded me of how the Timer app works on Android phones (image below is from the Timely app). You can add as many minutes/hours to the timer as needed by continuing to drag the cursor in a circle around the clock. Obviously the circular format works a lot better for clock-like functions, and it could ...


7

I suggest you replace the slider with a dial by removing the thumb indicator and adding arrowheads on either side so it looks something like this: I use a program at work that uses a similar dial to control frequency during an online simulation, and I've never seen anyone get confused with it. Here's the interface:


6

There are too many decisions to make at the same time on this. You should use JavaScript to progressively invalidate later choices, but maybe not in the way you were thinking. In a case like this, I would try to break it into steps and auto generate a much narrower form from the first choice. You can remove any illegal combination when you display the new ...


6

You normally design form fields to match the expected input. Do you have a maximum character count for this field? If so, you can display a countdown, decrementing that number as the user types, to provide them with real-time guidance on how wordy they are allowed to be, and also to circumvent the awkward flow of accepting their typing and then erroring out ...


5

What you are describing is a Combobox and has been in use for as long as I can think about GUIs. The concept has gained new momentum in the web with the further development of dynamic elements and web apps – most notably google's search box with it's suggestions-as-you-type. Chrome's "Omnibar" is, basically, the same thing: It's a text field you can type in ...


5

You could use your described system (hiding every entered character after input) but still showing every special symbol as in dots, slashes, underscores etc. giving the user the opportunity to check the length before and after those characters. Further I think it would be ok to show the TLD. Additionally - since you are using a touch screen - you could let ...


4

As we've designed a heavy-duty data entry forms (B2B/ERP) our case is probably different from the one stated, but it might shed some light upon it. Our users' interviews were inconclusive so we've decided to watch the users in action, take notes, measure occurrences of actions, and devise patterns of usage. On one form we had about 120 (!) fields. ...


4

It seems that there are some conflicting views when deciding to use a bold field input label or not. “In this layout [with labels above the input fields], it’s advisable to use bold fonts for input field labels. This increases their visual weight and brings them to the foreground of the layout.”—Luke Wroblewski. However, in an eye tracking study ...


4

Without understanding what the actual data is it's tough to recommend how to collapse but chances are users don't need to look at all of these columns at the same time. In fact since there is a scroll right now they can't look at them at the same time so you could easily swap out the scrolling interaction with the ability to collapse columns. So, I'd do ...


4

This sounds like a data-entry task, and I think it should be treated as such. That is, assuming that this is a task that returns with some frequency. When being confronted with such tedious work, it makes sense to optimize for speed rather than being friendly for new users. That means that you can afford your UI being harder to learn, as long as it is ...


4

Since you have acknowledged that users have an email address that they would prefer you to use, just ask them for that preferred channel. Don't try and second-guess whether it's a daytime/work/home/throwaway address: use the address they nominate. That is, the "most appropriate classification" is simply Preferred.


4

Hear those crickets? That’s the sound of no guidelines for dense data presentations for any design language. There has been a need for such guidelines since GUIs first arrived, but there aren’t any I know of. For what it’s worth, I’ve been developing my own approach for dense alpha-numeric GUI presentations over the years, which I described at Coded, ...


4

It seems like your users need something that first selects a less detailed milage area, with big steps. When that area is selected it's time to fine tune. One way of doing that could be something like my image below shows. As soon as the user clicks and drags in the span control (A), the red marker follows and a more fine tuned area (B) shows up. The user ...


3

The biggest problem I see with your current layout is the separation of content. It's very difficult to see the difference between your first time request to the one below it other than the repeating information. This will be even more difficult when viewed in a mobile browser. For the mobile version, I recommend separating the mobile view into two ...


3

There are a number of general methods that can be used, but they all fall into one of three categories. Reward them in some way for filling out the information. This site does it by giving you the Autobiographer badge, but you could do it by rewarding your customers in any way that is appropriate. Punish them by withholding some feature or ability until ...


3

It's no surprise that your users liked the old form better. It's almost always better for the user to see everything organized on one page at once, rather than one section at a time. This is because the user's eyes are always scanning and moving in various directions on the page and showing everything allows them to move through fields faster without ...


3

You could provide markers beside the scrollbar to show where incomplete fields are in the form. You could also use this to indicate where the sections of the page are. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups For inspiration/code take a look at the sausage.js library (example) and the Scrollbar of Contents Chrome ...


3

Here's an option: You could temporarily make the text box bigger. While active, you would increase the size of the text-box, turning it into a bigger area. Here's a quick mockup. Before overflow happens: When overflow happens: When a field has too much text: Or perhaps a bit more slick: Things of note: To make sure other elements in your design ...


3

how about using a data-entry tree like this http://www.csprousers.org/help/html/data_entry_tree.htm and this http://responsibility.motorola.com/web_help/scriba_12b_-_Remove_this_leaf.png http://responsibility.motorola.com/web_help/Scriba_XLM_Tools_Training/Scriba_-_Material_Data_Entry_for_Complex_Products.htm But this will again depend upon how much data ...


3

As a user, in most cases I don't trust parser that reads the sentence in such human language format. Most events I enter are appointments. Appointments are always important for me, so I always want to be 100% sure that it was added correctly. So if an application allows me to input my appointment like this, I completely ignore this feature and try to find a ...


3

It sounds like your customer is, like everyone else I know in finance, very much hooked on Excel. It might seem horribly cluttered to you, but this person is likely used to working with giant workbooks containing lots of sheets (accessed by tabs). They rarely want to learn a new workflow, so don't break your head trying to force other solutions on them. ...


3

EDIT Whatever number the user enters into the text box, that is the middle value of the slider. They can tweak that number by sliding left (for less miles) or right (more miles). How much distance to place between the middle number and the upper and lower ranges is up to you. In your case, there is a maximum number. 1 Year is 365 Days or 8,760 Hours ...


3

I might be missing something (you might have been referring to this when you said "standard +/- values"), but this seems like the perfect use case for a spinner: The design of the spinner is such that "the appearance of the spinner at a given time does not represent the quantity of the associated value" (Wikipedia). Thus, you wouldn't run into the problem ...


3

I like your general idea, but it seems that your users are not getting the metaphor. Which leaves you with two options: Make it very skueoumorphic, hoping that they will get the hint. Instead of using a slider, use something which looks like a physical lever that can be pushed more or less to the left (or right), and beside it a spinning number display ...



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