Hot answers tagged

44

Worked on a project with this exact problem. We needed a way for the admin staff to add attribute to products. Because attributes are used for search purposes, we need to ensure if that attribute type already exists, it should be selected instead of creating a brand new one. We ended up using something akin to your first idea. download bmml source ...


31

Well, I guess there is a maximum number of miles someone can travel in a year, since there are a finite number of seconds in year, and one cannot exceed the speed of light. A more practical limit may be 1000 miles every three days, which would be about 100,000 miles in a year. I suggest using a normal slider but with a logarithmic scale. i.e. equal spaced ...


31

I've always been enamored at the way the iOS quicktime application works when viewing MP3s in Safari, and I think this method can be adapted for your use. We can stay with a normal slider bar - perhaps the handle could be changed from the normal circle to show a difference. We can add tick marks to the bar and numbers that change on either end. Then, ...


24

The first idea failed field testing and variants failed usability testing It sounds like we had the same idea as your option 1, and we implemented it. We were looking for a way to force users to search first without users realizing that we were forcing the search to occur. A variant of our first design actually tested OK with a small sample in ...


21

One interesting solution that hasn't been proposed yet is a sort of "odometer" that the users could set to the desired number. This would have the benefits of preventing users from having to scroll through smaller numbers to get to larger ones, allowing users to be as precise as they wish, and being as simple as plain text entry without messing with a ...


21

My answer shows simularities with others posted here but I want to emphasize how important the right communication is. For example: Reconsider the used language to make the intentions clear. For example use create company to add some weight to the action or use the word new to emphasize the difference. download bmml source – Wireframes ...


12

I think a much easier solution for the end user, since you say the list of choices is the same for every row, is to have the table with the last column empty, and then a separate list somewhere on the page, near the table- not a dropdown but a list with all choices visible at a glance - where clicking a name will add it to the row automatically. This way, ...


12

Problem I think there are several usability problems in current design. Wide single line input limits the way that note could be expressed (no paragraphs, no breaks) and makes the reading much harder. Interaction style is non-convenient, as note-taking area is disjoined from appropriate order. This creates jump-and-search behavior while taking a note, ...


11

A general principle for power users is that they appreciate efficiency and can learn almost any control you give them. This is fantastic from your point of view because it means you can focus your interface design on speed optimisations and cut a lot of distracting fluff. Let's break down your users' actual workflow for a moment. Check through form, ...


7

Reading @Henrik Ekblom's comment about circular controls reminded me of how the Timer app works on Android phones (image below is from the Timely app). You can add as many minutes/hours to the timer as needed by continuing to drag the cursor in a circle around the clock. Obviously the circular format works a lot better for clock-like functions, and it could ...


7

I suggest you replace the slider with a dial by removing the thumb indicator and adding arrowheads on either side so it looks something like this: I use a program at work that uses a similar dial to control frequency during an online simulation, and I've never seen anyone get confused with it. Here's the interface:


6

What you are describing is a Combobox and has been in use for as long as I can think about GUIs. The concept has gained new momentum in the web with the further development of dynamic elements and web apps – most notably google's search box with it's suggestions-as-you-type. Chrome's "Omnibar" is, basically, the same thing: It's a text field you can type in ...


6

There are too many decisions to make at the same time on this. You should use JavaScript to progressively invalidate later choices, but maybe not in the way you were thinking. In a case like this, I would try to break it into steps and auto generate a much narrower form from the first choice. You can remove any illegal combination when you display the new ...


6

You normally design form fields to match the expected input. Do you have a maximum character count for this field? If so, you can display a countdown, decrementing that number as the user types, to provide them with real-time guidance on how wordy they are allowed to be, and also to circumvent the awkward flow of accepting their typing and then erroring out ...


6

User experience is different from data design Developers who move into UX often forget this important perspective change. Users don't think in terms of CRUD. They usually think in terms of what they want to get done. Some examples: For a micro blog, an author might want to create, update, and delete posts from the same convenient interface. For a ...


5

This sounds like a data-entry task, and I think it should be treated as such. That is, assuming that this is a task that returns with some frequency. When being confronted with such tedious work, it makes sense to optimize for speed rather than being friendly for new users. That means that you can afford your UI being harder to learn, as long as it is ...


5

It seems that there are some conflicting views when deciding to use a bold field input label or not. “In this layout [with labels above the input fields], it’s advisable to use bold fonts for input field labels. This increases their visual weight and brings them to the foreground of the layout.”—Luke Wroblewski. However, in an eye tracking study ...


5

You could use your described system (hiding every entered character after input) but still showing every special symbol as in dots, slashes, underscores etc. giving the user the opportunity to check the length before and after those characters. Further I think it would be ok to show the TLD. Additionally - since you are using a touch screen - you could let ...


5

Hear those crickets? That’s the sound of no guidelines for dense data presentations for any design language. There has been a need for such guidelines since GUIs first arrived, but there aren’t any I know of. For what it’s worth, I’ve been developing my own approach for dense alpha-numeric GUI presentations over the years, which I described at Coded, ...


5

Good question, but the Wolfram reference is terribly incorrect. The use of the period . in user interfaces is almost universal nowadays, and I would advise against trying to overload the comma. The spread of the decimal point is a pretty interesting case on the effects of globalization and technology. In this case, the broad standardization of global ...


5

I would describe this situation as: dynamic nested workflows. Dynamic because you cannot tell ahead of time how deeply nested the workflow will be (user may not create any new objects, or may create multiple carriers and persons). Nested because the workflows for creating a carrier and then a person are nested within each other. The dynamic nesting ...


5

Not commenting on the usability of this design pattern. The New Relic sign-up form uses this pattern. Example: Country drop-down/search field.


5

Joshua First, you would decide if all the questions are required to show on particular stage. For example - Stackexchange. There are 2 steps here: (Registration) Ask user for Name/Email and Password (Continue registration or Onboarding) Ask user for Avatar, address etc. Another example is stay-on-page process: It is nice because shows to ...


4

As we've designed a heavy-duty data entry forms (B2B/ERP) our case is probably different from the one stated, but it might shed some light upon it. Our users' interviews were inconclusive so we've decided to watch the users in action, take notes, measure occurrences of actions, and devise patterns of usage. On one form we had about 120 (!) fields. ...


4

Without understanding what the actual data is it's tough to recommend how to collapse but chances are users don't need to look at all of these columns at the same time. In fact since there is a scroll right now they can't look at them at the same time so you could easily swap out the scrolling interaction with the ability to collapse columns. So, I'd do ...


4

Since you have acknowledged that users have an email address that they would prefer you to use, just ask them for that preferred channel. Don't try and second-guess whether it's a daytime/work/home/throwaway address: use the address they nominate. That is, the "most appropriate classification" is simply Preferred.


4

It sounds like your customer is, like everyone else I know in finance, very much hooked on Excel. It might seem horribly cluttered to you, but this person is likely used to working with giant workbooks containing lots of sheets (accessed by tabs). They rarely want to learn a new workflow, so don't break your head trying to force other solutions on them. ...


4

It seems like your users need something that first selects a less detailed milage area, with big steps. When that area is selected it's time to fine tune. One way of doing that could be something like my image below shows. As soon as the user clicks and drags in the span control (A), the red marker follows and a more fine tuned area (B) shows up. The user ...


4

I might be missing something (you might have been referring to this when you said "standard +/- values"), but this seems like the perfect use case for a spinner: The design of the spinner is such that "the appearance of the spinner at a given time does not represent the quantity of the associated value" (Wikipedia). Thus, you wouldn't run into the problem ...


4

The problem with scrolling is that scrolling to the bottom of the list box can be inconvenient, and takes the user's attention from the text box where the item to add is located. Basically, the content to add is above the list, but the command to add is below the list. To resolve this, use the first method you described, but have the "Add" button beside ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible