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21

Don't require gender, don't even ask for gender. Ask for title instead. Eg: You can do the work yourselves in translating title into something useful for your demographics and you may actually get more from it than simply asking for gender: The ratio between determinate male and female titles will give your male/female split demographic to a pretty ...


12

Yes, this is excellent practice. It can even improve the responsiveness of your application, because doing the actual search on every key press can cause delays in itself. I have build a component (that we're using all over the place for this and similar purposes) that basically sets two times: a minimum time to wait for more input, and a maximum time from ...


11

I think you should let them know that they can opt to have you retain their data after unsubscribing or completely delete it. This way you can inform them that they have full control over their data as shown below download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If users do want you to retain the data, do inform them in the ...


9

I don't have any studies for auto-complete in particular, but perceptible latency for a user interface is thought to be at 100 milliseconds. At that point, the user feels that they are in control and the interface is responsive. With that in mind, there are a few factors you should consider. How quickly will your query return on slow internet ...


8

Don't. Users have goals. Let's say you want to buy a hairdryer. Let's suppose you have some vague idea on what kind of hairdryer you want. You type into Google: "Hairdryer shop" Let's suppose your site comes up first (or second) Instead of diving into hairdryer specifics, there's a popup asking you, "hey, you seem to be new here, we've just opened this ...


7

Instead of a dropdown, use three radio buttons. Allow the user to select a third radio button for "Decline to state/Other". Have the last radio button selected by default, and the user can change it. You do not need to mark the field as optional, since there will always be selection. To diminish your user's potential concerns that this information will be ...


7

The terms I commonly mention with the users are interface and database. Most users know the term User Interface (UI) and even if they don't I find it more immediate than front end. With database I mean both the DBMS and the server side code. Most users know or understand this (they realize there must be some server side code) but they don't care. For the ...


6

Front end -> User Interface (UI) or Client Application Back end -> Server I think that most technical and non-technical people would understand what you were referring to using these terms.


5

There is an extensive article related to this topic by LukeW. http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2008/06/international-address-fields-in-web-forms.php


4

Perhaps another way to think about this problem is how to get the most information from the user from their first input, and use this to make it easier for them to complete the rest of the entry. With this approach in mind, I would put the ingredient type first, as an autocomplete field, then dynamically restrict the unit dropdown based on the ingredient ...


4

To be the least intrusive I'd just ask for only the title of the book; anything more likely requires actually getting the book, plus filling out more form fields. If I'm reading Where the Wild Things Are to my kids I'll almost certainly know the title of the book (especially if I'm reading it several times). Other information requires good knowledge of the ...


4

I am not sure I understand the logic behind delaying the display of the keystroke. Remember your key stroke is the primary action which the user performs (the resultant search results are secondary) and the user would expect an immediate response to the primary action he has performed. A delay in the response would just confuse him. However with regards to ...


3

I would agree with you that in general having the default page show absolutely nothing isn't the best choice. I think you have a couple of options here to solve your slow loading problem. All of these patterns below assume that even if you apply some filters, you may end up with a list as big as the default page anyways. Implement Continuous Scrolling. ...


3

For starters, I would recommend against using popups to actually invite users to take part in a survey. They are just really intrusive and as enter link description herethis article on Smashing Magazine points out Pop-ups interrupt the browsing session of the visitors and require an instant feedback. Respect your visitors. With regards to how you can ...


3

Personally I'd make gender completely optional and remove it completely from the sign up process. There's no reason why it matters what gender your users are. Asking for this information creates friction in the sign up process - even if it's clearly marked as "for demographic purposes only". People are suspicious of requests for this type of information. If ...


3

Sounds like you want a Combo Box. jQueryUI has a nice example combobox here. You can use AJAX form validation to check and make sure it at least looks like a valid street/ect, and display a little message below the field, something to the effect of "Are you sure this address is correct?" Some validation rules might be to catch street names that are only ...


3

You could show the first 3 or 4 items and, if there are more, add a bottom at the bottom Show more or simply More.... Every time it is pressed you load other 3 or 4 items that are appended to the list. This kind of solution would work optimally if the items in the collection are somehow ordered by relevance. If the items are not ordered and the user has to ...


3

Having your name removed from a mailing list doesn't prevent it from being added again later. Companies are supposed to have a white list (subscribers) and a black list (people that aren't to be added to the subscriber list). Simply removing someone from your white list means that they could be added again later without you knowing that they shouldn't be ...


3

I propose to use colon symbol (:) for loops. It contains appropriate semantics: A colon is used to explain or start an enumeration. So, try {clients:} instead. The ending tag could be: {clients.} – save semantics, but maybe not very visible {:clients} – more consistent with starting tag


3

There's always ambiguity to a numeric scale, e.g. is DEFCON 1 or DEFCON 5 the most heightened state of readiness for the military? (Hollywood often gets this wrong, by the way) A class 1 cleanroom is cleaner than a class 10 clean room, but a BSL 4 lab has more safeguards than a BSL 3 lab. Outside of cases where the numbers correspond to a very specific ...


2

You could design a table like this with effective use of rowspans. It makes good use of horizontal space as 3 tasks can be displayed in the same row (in the best case). Conversely, our vertical space is saved in a big way, very useful if u have a lot of users. Additionally, the task count of each category of a user is represented using colour codes to ...


2

If you know for a fact that you will only want to count one type of tasks (in your example - Not Started) and that you want to highlight the tasks in progress, then you could go for a nested/grouped table. You basically have a list of tasks, grouped by user, and in the grouping row you display the important meta-data (number of unstarted tasks). And you can ...


2

If you are thinking about making this optional, do you really need this information? Furthermore, if optional, can you extrapolate from the users that entered this information to get to a reasonable statement for your entire user base? Crazy idea: If the answer is that you are fine with slightly inaccurate data, then you could remove the gender question ...


2

Effective but expensive... Checkout http://www.tealeaf.com/. It allows you to see the fine details of use. You can also setup most analytics systems, like Ominture or Coremetrics, to track every single selection (takes a lot of work though).


2

Forever, link the inactive accounts to a CLM* program to send the occasional; Hi, we miss you mail and re-activate some users over time. A hard part of online is getting users in, why remove them when they are finally in. Use it to your advantage! *(CLM = Customer Lifecycle Management) Good luck!


2

You should hold on to the accounts as long as possible. Using data from these accounts can help you make better business decisions in the future by analyzing data from it. It can help you improve your product with a very low footprint - as I said in my comment, disk space is cheap, and the account information is not. With regards to UX, you can reactivate ...


2

This is a really interesting question. My understanding of the legal situation is a user doesn't have to specifically opt-in to your marketing, providing you give them a way to opt-out in every email you send them. This seems to be referred to as 'soft opt-in', or 'implied consent' - they give you their details as part of getting a quote (or signing up to ...


2

Well in the UK there are various attempts. http://www.data.gov.uk/ is the main one as they are trying to open up the government data. All statistical data is posted here by www.statistics.gov.uk. The UKSA is responsibile for all statistical data from government, but how it all work is stupidly complex. Tim (I invented the internet) Bernes Lee is important ...


2

I think the best way to go about it might be a combination of the two (though this really depends on which information is most important). If it's important to differentiate whether it belongs to a workgroup or domain, I would suggest two columns, one listing the 'type' (domain or workgroup), and the other listing the 'name'. This avoids blank spaces in ...


2

'Show remaining' would be the equivalent of catering for someone that have first done some browsing and then decides that they want to see everything that they haven't seen before (i.e. remaining). People can already do that by looking at the item below the last one that they've seen, so there is no real need for that. I would suggest using 'show all' when ...



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