Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

128

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


42

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


27

You need to show the account balance when it is zero. If a user is using the account balance feature then they're going to get really confused if it disappears entirely. They have no way of knowing that account balance is temporarily hidden just because it dropped to zero. They are going to spend some time hunting for their account balance and get ...


17

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble ...


14

Bend that bar into a circle! A donut chart is perfect for 'percent of total' visualizations. And using color to indicate account "health" adds another layer for the visual thinker. It makes for a fairly compact presentation that delivers the all the critical data. For smaller spaces, I would limit the displayed data to balance only and tap/click to switch ...


12

I think it's your markers that are causing confusion, I believe something like this would make it easier to read. The colours are from Lucid Chart Android elements, there's no reason not to change them to your design guidelines or for something more pleasing. You could also stick a label under the gray area with "Available to spend: 5800" Example of ...


12

As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


9

Show it if it's ever been nonzero. There are two competing considerations: don't hide valuable information from the user, but don't overwhelm new users with information that they are unlikely to understand. Putting these together reveals a third option: show the account balance if and only if it has ever been nonzero. This way, you progressively reveal ...


9

UX Horror: Making users think Here some reasons why it's bad: Color is not helping: It's very hard to tell just by looking at the Contacts chart if blue/green portion matches the number, there isn't any clear sign to indicate this. I think that colors don't make a big difference in this kind of chart where they don't have a direct relationship with ...


5

Personal opinion: Tickers are good, as stated above, when the amount of space you have is defined (eg the ticker on a TV news channel). It's good because you can read a summary of the news quickly, as the TV presenter is going through a news story in detail. It also has the advantage that, because it's (usually) with the sound on, you can read the ticker and ...


4

It sounds like your customer is, like everyone else I know in finance, very much hooked on Excel. It might seem horribly cluttered to you, but this person is likely used to working with giant workbooks containing lots of sheets (accessed by tabs). They rarely want to learn a new workflow, so don't break your head trying to force other solutions on them. ...


3

Ideally you could provide me exactly what I need without any input. This is, of course, impossible to do with various types of users all wanting different things. The reality is some businesses just have a lot of content that needs to be accessed at different times by different people so here are some things to keep in mind as you redesign your portal ...


3

I would consider making the non-focused figure gray like this: You might even consider maintaining only one color as well: Even if you do keep the colors different then I would make sure to make the active color thick enough to be obvious: If the mouseover switching occurs then it should be immediately obvious what is going on. Please ...


3

The requirements are: Brief and concise, to catch the sense in a fast way Minimal, as it's not the full notification view Clickable to reveal the details I think you should be less wordy and focus user on the important information only. Offer # isn't for humans, it's for computer. Highlight the numbers only and make them readable with monospaced ...


3

You would need to test it out but I believe that one of these buttons would more clearly communicate the described action to the user...


2

You always want a semantic hierarchy to your page, so people understand the different elements of a page, including the page itself as a container for all these elements. It gives users context. (Often we talk about visual hierarchy, and how we use that information to derive semantic meaning. In the case of HTML and especially when talking about ...


2

If the 'home' page serves an important purpose in its own right and is somewhere that the user is likely to want to return to again and again (and it sounds like your dashboard is exactly that) I would absolutely include an explicit and prominent link back to it just for convenience. To look at it another way, there are no significant UX benefits in not ...


2

There is an interesting article written by the Nielson Norman group which discusses the time spent reading which suggests a need for more relevant and appropriate information to retain attention. Whilst not directly appropriate to your question does back up your own experience. Nielson Norman Group Article - How little do users read? Research is thin on ...


2

The two alternatives you've mentioned: Summary pages Windows-style drop downs An alternative that I've come up with is almost a combination of those two. Instead of an icon-based dashboard, I've come up with a windowed dashboard: Each window could list the various sites as links or buttons, with hierarchical links displayed as nested items: The ...


2

I believe it depends on the kind of layout you want to test. this would be more useful to complex layouts (such as dashboards). Did usability testing with screen recording and it provided some insights and user pain points. For us what was particularly useful is the sequence in which users tried to do things. Give the user specific tasks and observe how they ...


1

Click, nothing happens, click,click,click,click, cursor moves a bit, click, nothing happens, click, click, click, click to the old point. You can gather this information with modern tools but they are also screen recording with datasets. It will give you some insights but these insights can be also collected during the session. If you don't have any ...


1

The grid sounds like the safest thing to do. What you have there is quite fine and I have seen it in a lot of applications, so I won't give you suggestions for that. I will instead provide you with some more daring alternatives that cross into the realm of data visualization. The data you have there involves factories, products and resources. I don't know ...


1

Your idea is fine, but the execution is unclear which makes it not fine. Your goal should always be to minimize the amount of cognitive load you put on the user, and employ as many natural associations that you'd like and expect an average, rational-enough user to perceive. That is to say, you want to make things obvious. Your current flaws are: This ...


1

I'd treat the entire graphs as buttons, something like this: this way, you provide some degree of information to the user and make your element the trigger of an action, saving space as well as steps in your process. Of course you would need to test, but I think this approach will greatly reduce any cognitive dissonance by adding a quick eye scan ...


1

I was confronted with this challenge recently as well. There is a desire to have a "cool" portal page with lots of vaguely relevant icons leading to specific functional areas of the app. The trouble is, the whole thing feels forced. And if your app suite (or set of views and activities) gets very deep, the portal has a tendency to be either too shallow or ...


1

The reason why it's not a good ux design element is because it makes a webpage look like a financial TV channel. People see that sliding text and it links to their visual association of NEWS! READ ME! LOOK HERE!! NEWS! Etc. Arhhh, get me outta here! It's been done to death - so much so, that people will automatically click away after a second seeing it ...


1

Tickers are good for times where you have very limited vertical space (multiple tickers on some TV channels) or very limited space in general (back of a police car, like the previous answer). However, tickers have one big drawback - they dictate the reading speed. Someone who reads fast has to wait for the ticker to display the new word and someone who ...


1

Another thing that might work is to use tabs which mark the Summary Stats rectangle... then automatically switch context over to Specific Stats as needed in your example above but leaving a clear way back for the user...


1

There are two aspects here Do headings help in accessibility : Yes, this is because people with disablites who use screen readers or assertive tools can use shortcuts to quickly jump to headings while scanning content to get an idea of a look and feel of the site and decide on what to read.To quote this webaim article When encountering a lengthy web ...


1

I notice that you have both view tabs and edit tabs in the same hierarchy. To most people, tabs organize viewed data into logical sections, not separate different tasks (such as edit meta, description, and images). So your Overview, Stats, and Mods can stay as they are, but the rest of them should be transferred to the Overview pane as buttons or items in a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible