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UX Horror: Making users think Here some reasons why it's bad: Color is not helping: It's very hard to tell just by looking at the Contacts chart if blue/green portion matches the number, there isn't any clear sign to indicate this. I think that colors don't make a big difference in this kind of chart where they don't have a direct relationship with ...


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by importance of the action. by how destructive the action could be. by frequency of use. All of these suggest that the most-important, most-used and least destructive option be listed closest to the content. I'd suggest using a left to right on this menu as users are more often going to be editing something I'd say than removing it or cloning it to a ...


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Whether it's the hamburger menu or the menu bar, navigation should be consistent throughout your system. This features throughout most accessibility guidelines, is good for SEO, and is just generally good practice.


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Your pros and cons are spot on. So, if you have the time, I would create a responsive design. Wider screens leave the pane open with labels and then when room is limited you can collapse to just icons. But a warning about "icons only"...I have had first hand experience with this and what we found is that from a usability perspective "icons only" has too ...


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I would consider making the non-focused figure gray like this: You might even consider maintaining only one color as well: Even if you do keep the colors different then I would make sure to make the active color thick enough to be obvious: If the mouseover switching occurs then it should be immediately obvious what is going on. Please ...


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5-25 questions. How often do you expect users to "seek" to a specific question? Tablets & Phones: Use a "slide out menu" with question titles. Each row/menu item acting as a button to close the slide out and update the main area. Add buttons to the main UI for: first, previous, next, last question Allow for swiping left/right to transition to the next/...


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Make them consistent. If a user has discovered it once, you don't want to make them work to find it again. Ideally, you wouldn't need any help buttons at all. Your panels should be self explanatory and how they work should be obvious to your users at first glance. Having said that some complex interfaces require a small amount of learning, and help text ...


2

I believe it depends on the kind of layout you want to test. this would be more useful to complex layouts (such as dashboards). Did usability testing with screen recording and it provided some insights and user pain points. For us what was particularly useful is the sequence in which users tried to do things. Give the user specific tasks and observe how they ...


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Version 2 where more info is shown on the larger graph is better. The difference between the layout between large and small graphs in Version 2 is so slight that I'd bet if you ask your users, they would hardly have noticed. For data visualization, the most important thing for the user is in finding patterns within the dataset from your graphs. It's a good ...


2

Top-left, combined with your own branding. While Brian is correct that companies want to have their own branding, putting only their branding there is bad for troubleshooting and supporting the end-user. Though in some cases (apps distributed to the public) company branding gets prioritized over usability, this does not apply to back-end and B2B software....


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Top left is the standard position (see this site for example!). One other thing to consider if you're reselling is that not all logos fit within a square shape very easily - they may have vertical height, or be a particularly long name which will need to be resized to fit.


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From experience large companies will not want any other branding than there own. They spend alot of time training and conditioning employees to follow company values and identity. So if you are trying to sell "ABC PRODUCT" to "COMPANY LTD" they will almost certainly require the removal of the "ABC PRODUCT" logo. I would therefore recommend the header will ...


2

If I understand your question correctly, you would like the user of your app to change the text that appears on your app so that is can be written in their own language or for it to say whatever it is they want it to say. You idea was to create a long list of inputs to accomplish this. As for if that's "bad"... there is no good or bad in UX, just a degree ...


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Yes of course . Consistency and repeatability of the help contents are key to good user experience. For the users, make sure you devise ways for him to think that there is a place or location on the interface where he can get all the information that he needs. Besides, you could also add in a "Hover help (tooltips)", i.e When users place the cursor over a ...


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How often is the user expected to take this action? If it is something they do every time that they log into the site, then early education will do the trick, and they will learn it. Think about when you open your email client, your first reaction is to check for new mail and read new messages and you don't necessarily need anything more than a '...


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A dashboard is a very different UI than an application, so there is an argument that the navigation can be different. For example, the features are different, the purpose and goals are different, so what works for one might not work for the other. Consistency comes with advantages, so as a general rule of thumb the consistency argument should trump ...


1

To start with I recommend you use colour combinations with high levels of contrast. http://webaim.org/resources/contrastchecker/ You can also play with the alpha opacity (CSS3) to distinguish between hierarchy with the more opaque element being the most prominent. Primary: background-color: rgba(203, 244, 203, 1); Secondary: background-color: rgba(203, ...


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Top or left menu, there is no absolute answer. When it comes to designing for users, context is king. A navigation that works well in one context may not fit well for another context. To conclude which navigation is best for you application, it's important to understand the different context. Where the top and left navigation works. scanning A left ...


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I'm sad to say that it depends on your goals. For example, mood barometer, if you'd like to show overall mood trend mood survey, if you're interested in showing detail information about each mood mood stacked – same as a mood survey, but more informative. I could find 10+ options for this, so what's the best way to display results of a user ...


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Activity-centric views This is more than IA, it's a question of the entire user journey through your application. Step back and consider what activities your user is engaged in. Are there roles and activities that follow a business process or path to discovery about key insights? What do they need in front of them (and what drill-downs do they need behind ...


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It's the information architecture This question is about information architecture, or IA. That is, it's about how to organize the pages or the content. The good news is you can do research to determine which design suits your users. Otherwise, given the lack of context in your question, people who answer would be shooting in the dark. A good tool for IA ...


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while the context of these scenarios are different should the visualization also be different? Not necessarily, as long as your message does not confuse the user and provides the right copy in the right context. More details Upon first login the user may expect that there may not be enough data for the dashboard or if it takes time to update the data. ...


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My suggestion is - adding the loading image will solve the problem partially but still jumping panels(tables) will be there. If there is 6 table, then add the 6 loading image with the div panel as parent. Add fixed height for the loading image parent div element. Calculate fixed height based on the table on each div panel. I hope this will solve the ...


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While your mission to propagate an aesthetic factor in Data Viz domain is great, both versions have issues in their current state. Vertical text — always bad, never use it. 50-pixel legend serifs that are of no function. There are no grid lines for the eye to follow. The eye will be lost in the middle of the chart without them, and the data will be seen ...


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The idea of output value is mostly about correct operator's mental model of the system, otherwise it has low sense for them. To draw their attention, create focal point for the output box using Gestalt principle, but don't count on color only FOCAL POINTS Elements with a point of interest, emphasis or difference will capture and hold the viewer’...


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Click, nothing happens, click,click,click,click, cursor moves a bit, click, nothing happens, click, click, click, click to the old point. You can gather this information with modern tools but they are also screen recording with datasets. It will give you some insights but these insights can be also collected during the session. If you don't have any ...


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The grid sounds like the safest thing to do. What you have there is quite fine and I have seen it in a lot of applications, so I won't give you suggestions for that. I will instead provide you with some more daring alternatives that cross into the realm of data visualization. The data you have there involves factories, products and resources. I don't know ...


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Your idea is fine, but the execution is unclear which makes it not fine. Your goal should always be to minimize the amount of cognitive load you put on the user, and employ as many natural associations that you'd like and expect an average, rational-enough user to perceive. That is to say, you want to make things obvious. Your current flaws are: This isn'...



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