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123

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


41

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


17

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble ...


14

Bend that bar into a circle! A donut chart is perfect for 'percent of total' visualizations. And using color to indicate account "health" adds another layer for the visual thinker. It makes for a fairly compact presentation that delivers the all the critical data. For smaller spaces, I would limit the displayed data to balance only and tap/click to switch ...


12

I think it's your markers that are causing confusion, I believe something like this would make it easier to read. The colours are from Lucid Chart Android elements, there's no reason not to change them to your design guidelines or for something more pleasing. You could also stick a label under the gray area with "Available to spend: 5800" Example of ...


10

As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


5

A few thoughts: Time-multiplex the data. You can cycle through the sets of statistics, displaying each set for about 10 seconds. That way, you can use the entire screen to show only one set. This is only good if it’s not particularly important for users to see every statistic all the time (e.g., the TV is intended to provide an occasional motivation boost ...


4

Personal opinion: Tickers are good, as stated above, when the amount of space you have is defined (eg the ticker on a TV news channel). It's good because you can read a summary of the news quickly, as the TV presenter is going through a news story in detail. It also has the advantage that, because it's (usually) with the sound on, you can read the ticker and ...


3

The requirements are: Brief and concise, to catch the sense in a fast way Minimal, as it's not the full notification view Clickable to reveal the details I think you should be less wordy and focus user on the important information only. Offer # isn't for humans, it's for computer. Highlight the numbers only and make them readable with monospaced ...


3

You would need to test it out but I believe that one of these buttons would more clearly communicate the described action to the user...


3

It sounds like your customer is, like everyone else I know in finance, very much hooked on Excel. It might seem horribly cluttered to you, but this person is likely used to working with giant workbooks containing lots of sheets (accessed by tabs). They rarely want to learn a new workflow, so don't break your head trying to force other solutions on them. ...


2

In SharePoint Online (Office 365) this page is called Service Overview which is the first thing you see on the dashboard (link on the left navigation). If displays all services, their health and planned maintenance. It may be appropriate to your case.


2

You always want a semantic hierarchy to your page, so people understand the different elements of a page, including the page itself as a container for all these elements. It gives users context. (Often we talk about visual hierarchy, and how we use that information to derive semantic meaning. In the case of HTML and especially when talking about ...


2

If the 'home' page serves an important purpose in its own right and is somewhere that the user is likely to want to return to again and again (and it sounds like your dashboard is exactly that) I would absolutely include an explicit and prominent link back to it just for convenience. To look at it another way, there are no significant UX benefits in not ...


2

There is an interesting article written by the Nielson Norman group which discusses the time spent reading which suggests a need for more relevant and appropriate information to retain attention. Whilst not directly appropriate to your question does back up your own experience. Nielson Norman Group Article - How little do users read? Research is thin on ...


1

The reason why it's not a good ux design element is because it makes a webpage look like a financial TV channel. People see that sliding text and it links to their visual association of NEWS! READ ME! LOOK HERE!! NEWS! Etc. Arhhh, get me outta here! It's been done to death - so much so, that people will automatically click away after a second seeing it ...


1

Tickers are good for times where you have very limited vertical space (multiple tickers on some TV channels) or very limited space in general (back of a police car, like the previous answer). However, tickers have one big drawback - they dictate the reading speed. Someone who reads fast has to wait for the ticker to display the new word and someone who ...


1

Another thing that might work is to use tabs which mark the Summary Stats rectangle... then automatically switch context over to Specific Stats as needed in your example above but leaving a clear way back for the user...


1

There are two aspects here Do headings help in accessibility : Yes, this is because people with disablites who use screen readers or assertive tools can use shortcuts to quickly jump to headings while scanning content to get an idea of a look and feel of the site and decide on what to read.To quote this webaim article When encountering a lengthy web ...


1

I notice that you have both view tabs and edit tabs in the same hierarchy. To most people, tabs organize viewed data into logical sections, not separate different tasks (such as edit meta, description, and images). So your Overview, Stats, and Mods can stay as they are, but the rest of them should be transferred to the Overview pane as buttons or items in a ...


1

I think the key thing you might not be remembering here is you can created fixed menus that hover above the content. Make a fixed bar on the left with admin tools that only renders for admins. You can include the code in the navigation/header view and just not have it render for regular users. If they need more space, have the toolbar expand out when you ...


1

This is an answer based on my comment above. Looking at it from a user's POV, I'd like it if each section was clear and it was easy to read and understand what I can do where. That gives me that idea that you could organise your page into two main sections: current keys (categorised) and generate new keys. Here's a mockup of said design: I think this ...


1

This may be altogether wrong, so don't mind it in that case. But I like the way you can control your sessions in facebook (on the URL https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=security&section=sessions&view). There you have control over where you're signed in, when to end it or keep it going. It's not the same as your problem, but having a list like ...



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