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12

The psychology of a dashboard is to create an immediate feeling of being in control. As you say, it is a launching point. You need less tabular information on your dashboard, more graphs. Put each of your important tables on a page of its own. Give each the space it needs. Make the dashboard a central control point with summary information. Use ...


11

I've generally replace the space (where dashboard elements will live) with sample images. I grey them out and actually slap copy that says "Example Transactions" or "Example Data" ..what ever makes the most sense. That way your users aren't faced with big empty spaces and they become acclimatized to how the app will look with regular use. Here's a couple ...


10

Depending on the nature of data, you can use Tufte's Sparklines. This approach combines text, color and small graphics. Google Analytics makes use of this approach in their control panel:


10

Instead of starting with a cockpit or car dashboard metaphor, my choice would be to begin with something that is actually in the dashboard (or at least I assume is in your dashboard): namely, a graph or chart. For example: http://p.yusukekamiyamane.com/icons/search/fugue/#keyword=chart


10

I have found some links to some online resources and books. Hope it helps... https://cw.sdn.sap.com/cw/docs/DOC-142813 http://www.perceptualedge.com/library.php#Books http://apogeehk.com/archives/dashboards/ http://www.enterprise-dashboard.com/ http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/enhancing-dashboard ...


9

The reason some dashboards need to be scroll-free is that it is important for them to present information with a mere glance. The best example is perhaps the one that gave dashboards its name - the car driving dashboard. You can have the driver do any action before the relevant information is available, and it can be deciphered in a blink of an eye. Back ...


8

I'd recommend reading Donald Norman's Living With Complexity. In the book he differentiates between a complicated (or confusing) interface and a complex (or advanced) interface. He also discusses how to identify when increasing the complexity of an interface is worthwhile, among other topics. As you add more and more information on a screen, that screen ...


8

I guess UX design always starts with stating the goals of the user, and defining who the user is. Who is looking at this dashboard? A manager? What does (s)he want to know? Did you ask him/her? A very good way of getting to know what people need is to actually talk to them. Interactivity can be a lot of things, but perhaps (s)he just wants it like a slip ...


7

In general, "dashboards" that consist of lots of visual charts/graphs/dials/gauges: are something management LOVES are rarely all that useful At most, I'd suggest looking at color as a strong indicator of status. At least that has some typical relevance (uh oh, it's red! Who do I yell at!?) Beyond that, though, stick with communicating data rather than ...


6

A good, but admittedly rather emotional way to counter this argument is this quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away." For me, it's more important to find out if a piece of information is of any use whatsoever to the end user, and ...


6

What you're describing is a Kanban board. The concept started at Toyota and has been co-opted by the software industry. But the roots in manufacturing makes it a perfect metaphor for a dashboard for manufacturing processes. It starts with value stream mapping: identifying the activities that add value to your manufacturing process. They get represented as ...


6

Traditionally, accessibility (e.g. W3C) standards have demanded that choices only be actioned when the user instructs the computer to do so. This means separating the choice (e.g. selection of radio buttons, check boxes or list boxes) from the actioning of this choice (e.g. a "submit" button). There is also a general usability principle at work if you take ...


5

for a 40+ user group, avoid 'manage' itself. Make the links even more self-explanatory. 'Create New Page' 'Edit a Page' 'Add/Edit Categories' 'Approve/Remove Comments' non-tech savvy ppl have a tendency to get lost in the page structure, so a link called 'Pages' which has links to 'add page' and 'edit page' will add to confusion. Ofc if you have 20+ links ...


5

Perhaps the key challenge you're facing is that of making the information clear. Buy, borrow or steal (in order of preference) copies of Edward Tufte's classic works. The Visual Display of Qualitative Information should be your first port of call. You'll learn more from a casual read of this than from almost any other source. Aside: The graphic on the ...


5

I saw this article a few weeks ago about a UX designer with a similar predicament. He solved the problem with a combination of a traditional Axure prototype and some clever usage of Google Docs. He details the amount of time he spent vs. the benefits at the end of the article. If you're a bit tech savvy and can't justify getting developers involved this ...


5

The suspend control is controling the on/off switch - which leads me to this design. Mockup 1 shows on-state, mockup 2 shows off-state and mockup 3 shows suspended state: Both on and off are not in use, represented as disabled without anyone of them selected. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


5

A few thoughts: Time-multiplex the data. You can cycle through the sets of statistics, displaying each set for about 10 seconds. That way, you can use the entire screen to show only one set. This is only good if it’s not particularly important for users to see every statistic all the time (e.g., the TV is intended to provide an occasional motivation boost ...


4

Another take is, if you have a series of measures that are either "good" or "bad," then use a series of traffic lights. Starting there, an operator can see what the red items are, and drill further if needed. For example: So perhaps the icon would be:


4

A dashboard could represent both momentarily values or statistical data over time. When you look at a dashboard representing web traffic (like Google Analytics) you are often interested in statistical data of last month, last week or last day. Thus Google Analaytics dashboard icon is a graph. However, if you were to present instant values (such as your ...


4

Take a look at Ducksboard, an online service that you can use to monitor information coming from other web services like Mailchimp, Twitter, Zendesk, etc. They have some good inspiration regarding how to display various kinds of information graphically using graphs, large numerical readouts, sparklines, and specific data formats like weather, time, etc. You ...


4

In my experience, most WYSIWYG editors are too limited even for the non-tech-savvy users, and at the end of the day are more confusing than their dashboard counterparts. When a novice user sees a WYSIWYG editor, they expect it to display exactly what they'll see on the published page. However for all but the most basic of elements this is usually not the ...


4

If you want to cover your ass, do what most business apps do and include everything (bad UX). If you want something to be useful, then you need to find out from your clients what the most important metrics are to them. Don't accept the whole "They're all important" story. Some are key and need to be clear on the dashboard, while others can be ...


4

Just because a matter is subjective doesn't mean it's impossible to measure in a fair user test. Subjective measures exist and you can easily craft your own survey using simple Likert Scale questions. Craft a subjective measure regarding your site's visual design and let your users tell you how good each design is. Ideally you should use a Between Subjects ...


4

I think a better way would be a stacked bar graph. It would be one bar so the row height wouldn't matter, and it would be split up into colors the same way. Each color should take up whatever % of the bar, and they should be arranged in order so that the smaller ones are on one side and the larger ones towards the other. You should add a hover state (like ...


4

One way to solve this problem in an elegant and unobtrusive way, is to add a "Load more" or "View more" link or action button at the bottom of the display area in each grid. Check out the mockup below. The user can click/tap on that footer link to load/fetch more records. (Display a "loading.." message to provide feedback to the user on what's going on ...


3

As a user, my instinct would be to regard the tabs as the top-level menu. Being the highest element, it's the first thing I read, and so it's intuitive that it'd be the first 'point of decision'. You can resolve further confusion by employing three techniques: Don't let the side menu share any of the tab menu's vertical space. Don't be tempted to put any ...


3

Don't worry I am sure you will find a good layout, you are off to a good start taking the time to find one that works before doing the grunt work of filling it in. A good layout will improve the UX of your product more than anything else. That being said here is a list of examples: Patternry has a list of Dashboards (Mint.com, Google, more) Quince also ...



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