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126

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


41

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


26

You need to show the account balance when it is zero. If a user is using the account balance feature then they're going to get really confused if it disappears entirely. They have no way of knowing that account balance is temporarily hidden just because it dropped to zero. They are going to spend some time hunting for their account balance and get ...


17

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble ...


14

Bend that bar into a circle! A donut chart is perfect for 'percent of total' visualizations. And using color to indicate account "health" adds another layer for the visual thinker. It makes for a fairly compact presentation that delivers the all the critical data. For smaller spaces, I would limit the displayed data to balance only and tap/click to switch ...


13

The psychology of a dashboard is to create an immediate feeling of being in control. As you say, it is a launching point. You need less tabular information on your dashboard, more graphs. Put each of your important tables on a page of its own. Give each the space it needs. Make the dashboard a central control point with summary information. Use ...


12

I think it's your markers that are causing confusion, I believe something like this would make it easier to read. The colours are from Lucid Chart Android elements, there's no reason not to change them to your design guidelines or for something more pleasing. You could also stick a label under the gray area with "Available to spend: 5800" Example of ...


11

Instead of starting with a cockpit or car dashboard metaphor, my choice would be to begin with something that is actually in the dashboard (or at least I assume is in your dashboard): namely, a graph or chart. For example: http://p.yusukekamiyamane.com/icons/search/fugue/#keyword=chart


11

I've generally replace the space (where dashboard elements will live) with sample images. I grey them out and actually slap copy that says "Example Transactions" or "Example Data" ..what ever makes the most sense. That way your users aren't faced with big empty spaces and they become acclimatized to how the app will look with regular use. Here's a couple ...


11

As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


10

Depending on the nature of data, you can use Tufte's Sparklines. This approach combines text, color and small graphics. Google Analytics makes use of this approach in their control panel:


10

I have found some links to some online resources and books. Hope it helps... https://cw.sdn.sap.com/cw/docs/DOC-142813 http://www.perceptualedge.com/library.php#Books http://apogeehk.com/archives/dashboards/ http://www.enterprise-dashboard.com/ http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/enhancing-dashboard ...


10

The reason some dashboards need to be scroll-free is that it is important for them to present information with a mere glance. The best example is perhaps the one that gave dashboards its name - the car driving dashboard. You can have the driver do any action before the relevant information is available, and it can be deciphered in a blink of an eye. Back ...


9

I guess UX design always starts with stating the goals of the user, and defining who the user is. Who is looking at this dashboard? A manager? What does (s)he want to know? Did you ask him/her? A very good way of getting to know what people need is to actually talk to them. Interactivity can be a lot of things, but perhaps (s)he just wants it like a slip ...


9

Show it if it's ever been nonzero. There are two competing considerations: don't hide valuable information from the user, but don't overwhelm new users with information that they are unlikely to understand. Putting these together reveals a third option: show the account balance if and only if it has ever been nonzero. This way, you progressively reveal ...


8

I'd recommend reading Donald Norman's Living With Complexity. In the book he differentiates between a complicated (or confusing) interface and a complex (or advanced) interface. He also discusses how to identify when increasing the complexity of an interface is worthwhile, among other topics. As you add more and more information on a screen, that screen ...


7

In general, "dashboards" that consist of lots of visual charts/graphs/dials/gauges: are something management LOVES are rarely all that useful At most, I'd suggest looking at color as a strong indicator of status. At least that has some typical relevance (uh oh, it's red! Who do I yell at!?) Beyond that, though, stick with communicating data rather than ...


6

A good, but admittedly rather emotional way to counter this argument is this quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away." For me, it's more important to find out if a piece of information is of any use whatsoever to the end user, and ...


6

Perhaps the key challenge you're facing is that of making the information clear. Buy, borrow or steal (in order of preference) copies of Edward Tufte's classic works. The Visual Display of Qualitative Information should be your first port of call. You'll learn more from a casual read of this than from almost any other source. Aside: The graphic on the ...


6

What you're describing is a Kanban board. The concept started at Toyota and has been co-opted by the software industry. But the roots in manufacturing makes it a perfect metaphor for a dashboard for manufacturing processes. It starts with value stream mapping: identifying the activities that add value to your manufacturing process. They get represented as ...


6

Traditionally, accessibility (e.g. W3C) standards have demanded that choices only be actioned when the user instructs the computer to do so. This means separating the choice (e.g. selection of radio buttons, check boxes or list boxes) from the actioning of this choice (e.g. a "submit" button). There is also a general usability principle at work if you take ...


5

for a 40+ user group, avoid 'manage' itself. Make the links even more self-explanatory. 'Create New Page' 'Edit a Page' 'Add/Edit Categories' 'Approve/Remove Comments' non-tech savvy ppl have a tendency to get lost in the page structure, so a link called 'Pages' which has links to 'add page' and 'edit page' will add to confusion. Ofc if you have 20+ links ...


5

I saw this article a few weeks ago about a UX designer with a similar predicament. He solved the problem with a combination of a traditional Axure prototype and some clever usage of Google Docs. He details the amount of time he spent vs. the benefits at the end of the article. If you're a bit tech savvy and can't justify getting developers involved this ...


5

Document Hierarchy First, you have to understand that the Home Page originates from the concept of a document hierarchy. Where the top most document is referred to as the home, and all child documents in sub-categories are it's descendants. To navigate from any given point in the hierarchy to the top was to return Home. Document Structure When Applicable ...


5

The suspend control is controling the on/off switch - which leads me to this design. Mockup 1 shows on-state, mockup 2 shows off-state and mockup 3 shows suspended state: Both on and off are not in use, represented as disabled without anyone of them selected. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


5

A few thoughts: Time-multiplex the data. You can cycle through the sets of statistics, displaying each set for about 10 seconds. That way, you can use the entire screen to show only one set. This is only good if it’s not particularly important for users to see every statistic all the time (e.g., the TV is intended to provide an occasional motivation boost ...


5

Personal opinion: Tickers are good, as stated above, when the amount of space you have is defined (eg the ticker on a TV news channel). It's good because you can read a summary of the news quickly, as the TV presenter is going through a news story in detail. It also has the advantage that, because it's (usually) with the sound on, you can read the ticker and ...


4

Another take is, if you have a series of measures that are either "good" or "bad," then use a series of traffic lights. Starting there, an operator can see what the red items are, and drill further if needed. For example: So perhaps the icon would be:


4

A dashboard could represent both momentarily values or statistical data over time. When you look at a dashboard representing web traffic (like Google Analytics) you are often interested in statistical data of last month, last week or last day. Thus Google Analaytics dashboard icon is a graph. However, if you were to present instant values (such as your ...



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