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559

This is the historical reason: (Concept drawing taken from document: VLSI-81-1_The_Optical_Mouse.pdf) The mouse, and therefore the mouse cursor, was invented by Douglas Engelbart, and was initially an arrow pointing up. When the XEROX PARC machine was built, the cursor changed into a tilted arrow. It was found that, given the low resolution of the ...


230

Take your right hand and point to your question. There, you see.


146

In addition to Bart's answer, I'd like to add one more reason. The reason the arrow was tilted to the left was so that the click position was easier to calculate, because the origin of the cursor's bitmap was in the upper left. This saved the mouse tracking subroutine a calculation on every click (its not much but it helped on older machines). Source


78

Low level visual cognition In addition to the various answers given, there is also sense in a tilted mouse pointer if one considers the visual processes in our brain. Visual information arriving from our eyes is first processed in the primary visual cortex by the V1 area, then by the V2 area. These two areas recognise low-level visual features (hue, ...


38

The "busy" cursor and "background busy" cursor are frequent sights in Windows. You say, "...I haven't seen a wait/busy/hourglass cursor in quite some time." I believe this is because you have grown accustomed to them and no longer notice. Open Microsoft Word (2010), click on the "File" ribbon and click "save." You will see the "busy" cursor flash a few ...


25

In case anyone wonders : some less known interfaces did use a straight arrow as pointed in Reddit


22

The common solution to this issue is to leave the default mouse cursor and instead "gray out" or somehow make a visual change to the part of the screen that cannot be interacted with, rather than your mouse cursor. Look at some disabled web form controls for an excellent example.


21

Buttons are a traditional desktop software UI control - a context where the hand pointer has never been used before the advent of internet. When web pages started to use the same control, they just kept the button as it was in a desktop environment.


18

Here's the patent for the blinking cursor patent: http://www.google.com/patents/US3531796 According to that, it was invented by Charles A. Kiesling at Sperry Rand. Patent filed Aug 24, 1967, granted Sep 29, 1970. This isn't iron clad proof that it was first invented at that time, but the time seems about right (computers were getting powerful enough that ...


17

It's all about Affordance. Buttons have a high affordance which visually suggest how they can be used. The hand pointer is used when affordance is lower to provide an indication of how to interact with that item. 'Well-designed user interface (UI) objects are said to have affordance, which are visual and behavioral properties of an object that ...


14

I've always thought that the arrow cursor is shaped similarly to your hand if you were point (naturally) at the screen with your (as typically dominant) right hand. I have no support of this other than my own subjective experience but it strikes me as a natural shape when trying to relate real world interaction into a low resolution computer screen where ...


13

Having your cursor slanted would be a UX improvement over a permanently vertical cursor. Many word processors already do this. Here are some examples from MS Word: It gives additional feedback to a user that the text they enter will be italic, and it is visually less confusing when selecting text. At the same time, I can't think of any reason that it ...


12

Simple answer, it was Charles A. Kiesling Sr. He was my father and he did indeed write the code for the blinking cursor when he worked at Sperry. He passed away yesterday in Minneapolis at the age of 83. I remember him telling me the reason behind the blinking courser and it was simple. It was not because it looked like an "I". He said there was nothing ...


12

Also, there is another answer to this question. As a rule, the arrow mouse cursor must have one sharp tip (vertex) - because it is an arrow :) On the other hand, it is better for a mouse cursor to look good and slick. But drawing sharp tip on a rectangular pixel based display is very hard, especially without anti-aliasing. The 0 degrees (horizontal or ...


9

This is the not-allowed cursor (as opposed to the same cursor used for no-drop) and which is part of the CSS3 cursor spec - for example see it used on jsFiddle - move the mouse over the preview/result area to see it in action (as set by the CSS code at top right) Note: the demo is the CSS code running - not jsFiddle itself changing the cursor! I would ...


9

The hand cursor icon is used for controls that provide navigation-like interaction. The regular cursor icon is retained when the interactive items are not for navigation, e.g. command/action buttons. The distinction between navigation and navigation/action can sometimes be subtle in apps like Gmail, but it is an important one and can drive user expectations ...


8

The default Windows cursor (white with black outline) uses the red pixel as its hotspot. The default Mac cursor (black with white outline) uses the topmost pixel of the black arrow as its hotspot. Two down, and one to the right of the red pixel. As far as user intentions go, they are going to expect the cursor to act the same everywhere and not suddenly ...


7

Custom cursors suit custom actions. For example in some 3D interactive interface, (CAD, games, etc) then custom cursors are going to help immensely, but if you're providing a similar level and style of interaction to the rest of the desktop or to other applications on the same platform then it makes sense to make use of the familiarity of system cursors ...


7

Google has added this differing in hovering feedback to make a visual distinction between navigational elements and action elements in the UI. It's really to distinguish the semantics between actions like Compose a new mail and Open email. So that is basically the strategy behind the behaviour. The reason however, how they feel that this will improve the ...


7

Both CSS 2.1 and CSS3 Basic UI specs definitely say that pointer cursor is exclusively for links. One of the authors of the CSS 2.1 Test Suite wrote a following remark in W3C mailing list: Even when hovering the cursor over an <img onclick="...some function...">, a push button, a radio button, a checkbox, the cursor under Windows does ...


7

Interestingly, hovering the submit button on this comment form changes the cursor to the hand. I would say "arrow=do and hand=go" was probably a convention at one point, but it's been widely discarded through a) ignorance to it and b) better design. Make a button look clickable and the cursor change won't matter to the end user.


7

I think you and your co-worker are examples of those folks in the User Interface Conservatism versus Liberalism article. It's battle between liberal designer (you) and conservative designer (co-worker). What I really like in this article is: The problem with UI liberalism is not that it necessarily makes for bad interfaces. On the contrary, there ...


4

forcing focus to search could have negative usability implications towards screen readers and other accessibility tools. I would suggest against it - the only caveat being if a user navigates to the page from another link which is explicitly designed to "take the user to the search page" (like an "advanced search" link - assuming you can not provide the ...


4

Apple used to solve this in Carbon (on page 34) in two ways: 1. Use a double cursor When you are on a space between the LTR and RTL parts of the text and you type LTR characters, it will appended to the LTR part of the text, when you type RTL characters you will append it to the RTL part. The cursor is positioned at the end of the Arabic text and the ...


4

Consistency matters in UX, even when it is in things that most people will not be able to consciously notice. I don't see any worthwhile advantage for this in any application. I've never heard a single person complain that in gmail the cursor isn't mirrored, and so I can't imagine that it is a problem for anyone. Rather spend the time making other aspects ...


4

I would like to add to the above some technical reasons: In a form that has multiple fields, the page may for whatever reason load a bit later than when the user started to interact with fields, so when the page finally loads, you force cursor on search field while the user is typing in another field, you can imagine how frustrating that is, especially in ...


3

Text cursor I would consider using a block cursor to avoid any ambiguity between whether the character being entered in part of ltr or rtl text. A cursor kept at the point of insertion will always fail at the boundaries between ltr and rtl text. Navigation and selection I think one area where a small change can greatly simplify things, is to reconsider ...


3

The cursor should show the current active state of potential interaction. When over the Canvas, it should display the tool's cursor. When over the interface, it should show the typical selection cursor. The cursor is a hint for what happens when the user interacts (clicks) with the current item. You don't paint buttons; you click them, so the cursor should ...


3

Custom cursors are a problem because they're breaking convention; in addition, it's breaking a convention you really can't try to emulate. You can try making your cursor look like a variation of the default cursor, but what about different cursor sizes, different default cursors across different platforms? Custom cursors work well in games because the ...



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