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There is no silver bullet here, but from my experience there are only two solutions: Make a responsive layout. All elements are "rubberish", can adjust to the content without breaking the design. Layout is adaptive to browser page size. Work with translators to shorten the words. When translators are not clear on boundaries they come up with long words. If ...


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The point is not about how it is written on a single line. Humans are conditioned to reading lists top to bottom or left to right. When you change the orientation, it reduces confusion if top to bottom also coincides with Left to right. For instance, if there are are three books that are Part 1, 2, 3. Our natural way of stacking them would be to keep 1 on ...


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Have an area of your UI used to select the "From", and once "From" is set, show the remaining options for "To". Though, you should also allow searching by destination language too for complex use cases*. An entry could be used to let users type a language name in order to filter the options faster. Yes, this is exactly how you book an airplane ticket. And ...


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I suggest to limit the lists by detecting the languages. Check for special characters, they are the key. This will help to detect "from" or at least limit the options. Then use current browser locale to choose the default "to" language. I believe this should cover 80% of the use cases. The remaining 20% may choose their "from" and "to" languages from ...


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Here your problem is what will happen when list increase. So short answer make it simple for the developer and for the user. Add 2 drop down (from, to) that will handle if lists go long and even as a developer it's easy to maintain in future. Current UI Users have to search for what they are looking for. If list goes long then it's difficult to ...


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If the user is likely to use the same dictionary over and over, then put your selector in a prefs pane so they don't have to make that selection every time. They can then simply click or double-tap and see the translation immediately, in whichever dictionary they last chose. (Or in whichever dictionary you set as the default, before they pick one.) (One of ...


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I agree with "clockwise on right, counter-clockwise on left" approach. My hunch is that this mental mode comes to us from building signage, where text which appears on flags or banners looks more "natural" if its baseline aligns with the building wall (longer, visually dominant surface). Likewise, vertical screen edges are visually dominant surfaces in UI ...


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I wouldn't say it is always a bad UI design, but scrolling is one of those things that should not be counter-intuitive and behave in a way the user does not expect. On a touch device, for example reverse scrolling feels natural (as you would drag paper UP to read DOWN. However with a desktop environment we have decades of training to tell us: Moving the ...



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