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7

Basically the validation for large IA is similar as in other situations. Do a closed card sort. Other comments on your problem: Check the the article Scaling the card sort method to over 500 items: restructuring the Google AdWords help center by Nakhimovsky et al for ideas on how to conduct card sorts with a lot of items. In essence you have to get the ...


5

Recently I took a survey asking people what they wanted from a mobile app in general and put the results up here. Although a lot of it seems like common sense (which it is) it gives you a good jumping off point from which to start. A crowd-sourced app in particular is going to need good UX as it requires the user to do more than just use the app, they have ...


4

Take a look at this fantastic animation about the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation:


3

Note: I represent Optimal Workshop, the company who makes the tools I propose below. If your budget allows, I'd suggest you begin with a moderated card sort with a small number of participants (3-15). You will probably learn something about your card labels and content coverage in this process, so you can make any necessary adjustments to your cards at the ...


1

It's pretty much and impossible question to answer - the list of tools you link to are very different and best used in quite different contexts. For example Silverback is a great tool for folk doing on-site usability tests. If you've using a usability lab - probably a waste of time. Google Website Optimizer - great for cheap A/B testing. Not useful for ...


1

If you haven't already, you should read Clay Shirky's book on crowdsourcing, Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. As everyone here is obviously a fan of Stack Exchange, it's worth noting that its creator, Jeff Atwood, often points to Shirky as a source of inspiration. Wired recently published an article by Dan Ariely, How ...


1

I could answer for myself and I have to say for me it's the reputation system as others have mentioned. I have never been interested in creating content because the reward of posting something helpful to anonymous strangers such as yourselves :) never really appealed to me as I got nothing back in return or if I did, it was in the context of a comment in a ...


1

Humans are ultimately pack animals. We crave interacting with a pack, helping others and receiving recognition for what we do. Although monetary rewards certainly work, when I think of the endless people hours that went into writing and editing Wikipedia for free, it seems obvious that money is not the only, or even the greatest motivating factor. ...


1

Jono Bacon, former community manager of the Ubuntu (Linux) operating system wrote a good e-book on managing communities called The Art of Community. It's good for the nuts and bolts on managing open source projects.



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