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1

The problem with the term "User Experience" compared to "user friendly" is that it is too vague and too comprehensive (and perhaps too technical) for marketing purposes. The criticism (we professionals) raise against the "user friendly" term is exactly what makes it so marketing friendly: 1) We say that "you can't use that term because it only reflects a ...


3

This is a content strategy questions and the answer would depend on the tone of your overall site. Some sites have spent a lot of time developing a "personality". So within that concept, if your site overall is a straight transnational (in, out, done) site it would be good to end with a message that fits that content model. Such as your typical, "Your order ...


3

It really depends on your site, who your customers are, and what they expect. One can conceive of a website as a medium in which "You, the store owner" are talking to "Me, the buyer." In that scenario a more personal scenario may work very well. In other cases (say Amazon) in which one knows there isn't a "person" on the other end it may not work as well. ...


5

Here is a supplemental answer. Dont show priority with different colors! Use Different shades of the same color 8% of men are colorblind You can change the shade of a color to prioritize or show emphasis without introducing new colors. By altering shade you can show similar emphasis than introducing different colors. *note the other strategies such ...


1

Inspired by MonkeyZeus - you can group the categories to achieve an easier structured overview: View Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/o3mbryg6/


0

Since you are looking for a relatively small number of categories I would suggest displaying the data in categories so that it is easily scannable and prioritizable. Rayraegah's answer is pretty good but I really dislike the cognitive load. Here is my suggest: http://jsfiddle.net/L3xeqvd0/ HTML <div class="section"> <div ...


45

Priority shouldn't be numbered or substituted with characters. Traditionally they've always been a label to instruct the end user what they represent. This is what we use. A combination for Color and Label or Icon and Label. For a user with accessibility or someone using a screen reader, the priority is read out as text. Ideally, there has to be a visual ...


1

I would say that the most important one should be at the top. Maybe you should also make this visible throu color. An color with high saturation looks more important that one with less saturation You can also make things important by taking up more space and using bigher fonts. You can also use an ! as Symbol to mark things important. You can use more ...


1

I think it's key to take into account exactly what sort of UX is going on in the app. Some situations where "you" is definitely not appropriate: Signup form for a company, not an individual Management tool where the individual's settings are not the focus - eg. managing a calendar or an admin interface for a website Any interface where the admin is in a ...


4

There isn't any "better" solution to this which applies universally, but generally I would err on the use of "You" rather than the person's name when addressing them or referring to them when they are reading. Partly this is because I favour a casual form of address in applications, but there are some other reasons too: Tone "You" presents a more personal ...


7

Using the word "you" should generally be reserved for descriptive texts that address the logged in user. For example, you would say "You have 1 task assigned to you" to illustrate that the user has a task pending, but in a grid of tasks and various status values, it would look more consistent to have the user's display name instead of just "you." If you ...


0

Store credit. Wallets are things you use in several stores. So for example if I get money from amazon to put in my wallet, I can go and spend it on ebay.com. But what you're describing is limited to just the website you're currently on, more like a coupon or gift certificate. In other words, not 'portable'.


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I'd go with 'Account credit'. Here in the UK, 'store' is more something you do rather than somewhere you go - you go to the shop. Appreciate that cultural boundaries are blurring, but I think that particularly for international use, everyone has an 'account' with you, but not everyone will immediately get the 'store credit' reference. On a related note: ...


0

I agree there is no rule here, but in my opinion, Wallet credit is a far more vague and ambiguous concept than store credit. You should aim to have descriptive labels that match real life context. In this particular situation I would advice to go with store credit as its more descriptive and more aligned with e-commerce particularly if users could also ...


0

Edit: I think I misunderstood the question a bit. You're referring to credits and not the storage medium. In this case, Store credit makes more sense. To draw a parallel, you put "currency" in your physical wallet and not "wallet currency". Hence for an e-commerce setup, Store credit or credit would be the more appropriate term. Example - "You've received ...



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