Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Communicating with users is an important feature in any application on any platform, so this is something that needs to be done right or it can have detrimental effects to the UX of the entire application. Some preamble: In the early days of the Web, content was static and hand-coded. Server-side involvement was minimal and the possibility for errors ...


2

IMO it really depends on the context of your App/Site. Using the text which suits your context may becomes more intuitive for the user as well as he builds a frame of reference. I worked on a shopping App, They were specifically showing shopping categories in hamburger menu. For them its a great idea to use the text like below Many Shopping apps may ...


2

I would argue that the most accurate word besides menu would be "navigation". Shortening it to nav might be alienating for a less tech-literate audience. But stay aware of innovating for the sake of innovation."Menu" is a metaphor that is pretty well-established and has taken years for users to internalize. On one hand I think it is important to stay ...


0

There are very interesting and innovative answers being given, but I think you'd have to explain your requirement a little more so as to make the right decision. For example, Does everyone know how many people have bookmarked an item? Does the original poster know that he is not bookmarked / followed? What if that user is already bookmarked and you click ...


0

In the context you require for showing appreciation ('liking') items in a feed, I think an icon based thumbsup/thumbsdown or heart/broken heart would work well... This way, users can simply rate or not rate a feed item without it be closely associated with another web app and overcomes the problem of finding the right term to fit in with your app that ...


2

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


0

Markers used by Google and pins by Apple, where it really are a pins. So if you're writing about iOS and OSX, use pins, otherwise markers.


1

What about calling them Points of interest? This is descriptive to your user, doesn't have a positive or negative connotation and is clear on what it means. Using markers or pins is a good way to describe the icon, but what you want to describe is the actual location. For this reason I would advise calling them:"points of interest", "locations" (as ...


2

"Markers" is probably the best technical term. "Pins" is probably the most common word in a non-technical, colloquial sense. I tend to agree with @Benny in the sense that you should use what is most familiar to your users - however I don't think that that vast of a majority of users call it a "pin" as opposed to "marker". But I'm just speculating, so go ...


0

Could you rename them to "locations" (or something similar), referring to the area that you are marking rather than the object that is doing the marking?


7

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


1

I use a word in day-to-day life "Me gusta". Though it is spanish but being a popular meme term I think any user can relate to this.


4

Changing the perspective can open other options. Taking the user's perspective and benefit as the primary lens, you can come up with words like : keep save collect These words tell you about the value for you as a user and change the focus that is often put onto the contents themselves which eventually get the benefit of the user's action (distinction, ...


3

I have used "Recommend" for forum posts in the past, and simply displaying the number of recommendations in a button next to each post. Rolling over the post adds "Recommendations: " in front of the button to explain it a little. It appears to work well - I appreciate not exactly the same use-case as yours, but you might like it.


6

This is very interesting and immediately reminds me of Pinterest. Pinterest has two different actions one called "Pin", which basically bookmarks that item, which most of us can assume that if you are pinning something then you also like it. However, Pinterest also has an option to like a pin. Why would you need the option to have both, when would you want ...


1

You forgot about "vote it up", I think. Sounds quite neutral and not facebookish. "upvote" probably goes too, but it is a bit stackexchangish ;-) tag and bookmark don't seem to be synonyms of like.


6

Have you heard about reactions? You can see how Fastcompany.com is using it on some of their blogposts and the full documentation of it here: http://www.readrboard.com/. I've take a look at it and responding to your question, this technology allows your users or visitors to select the type of impression they have about what they are reading/viewing. I ...


9

I think there are a couple that you could use that have good iconography: Pound It! or Fist Bump It! and (in my best Borat voice) High Five! Important Note: When you click the high five icon it should always play the corresponding sound!


27

What about Star? Google Reader did this and it was pretty clear it went into the Starred Items folder and your friends would also see you starred an item; it also served to bookmark. The other thing I was just thinking is that unless you told people, no matter what term you used it would still be unclear you "liked" that user. That seems totally different ...


4

You'll find that nearly without exception, question form in modals is little appropriate. On content vs interaction Probably to core duality in all interfaces is the that of content and interaction. Respectively, what you can see and what you can do. Cognitively, these are mapped to (so to speak) two cognitive processes - interpretation and action, which ...


3

What is the utility to 'liking' items, in respect to your product context & brand? Think of a verb that reinforces the brand: If you have an academic product, you might choose "cite" If it's a competitive scenario, choose "promote" These are just a couple simple examples


82

"Like" is Facebook's creation and is strongly associated with Facebook. +1 is Google+'s creation and is totally associated with its brand. Thinking out of the box... It seems your functionality is not exactly the same as "liking". It's more "like & follow". There is no single word for that, so alternatively you could invent your own vocabulary. ...


3

Maybe you can come up with a phenomenon taken from the context of your app. Take Pinterest as an example, where you "pin" something on you pinboard. Is there some action in the real world that would reflect what you are trying to do? It is a bit hard to come up with something without the context of your app, but if we are to keep it a bit more general here ...


44

Personally I like love which is often represented by an icon of a heart and popular in social media. Then you dont have to write the word love but simply use the heart. But if you don't like the heart icon, you can always find a synonym from Thesaurus.com:


20

I think "Favourite" is the nicest commonly used internet term that encompasses the ideas of "like" and "bookmark".


1

YES! It is but it has to fit the "design language". We don't usually see punctuation in titles, that's a big graphical difference. Titles are also rarely full sentences. So for a window I would say it's probably better not to do it. The thing is that modals don't need titlebars. They are not windows. If you are able to make it work out graphically, in a ...


3

Microsoft doesn't always have the correct answer, but they do set the standard. In this case, I think the question is lost if it's in the title bar. I would probably phrase the text like this: Title: Save Progress Text: You have unsaved changes on this page. Would you like to save them now?


15

My answer would be to synopsis the question of the modal form, so with the question being: You are leaving the question with unsaved changes The title would be: "Unsaved Changes" It's a pattern I've seen and used regularly, it's brief and informative.


24

Not according to Microsoft. Use title-style capitalization, without ending punctuation. Source: Microsoft Guidelines for Windows, section about error messages.


8

This area is normally giving you information on the type of question being asked (at least in my experience), so the question mark feels like the dialog is questioning itself. I'm a "Save Changes" dialog... or am I?



Top 50 recent answers are included