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I think that this quite recent article (June 2014) about the "Sign Up" button can help: the author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212% (more data in the article). His thesis is that the standard "Sign Up" buttons don't work because "they ask for blind commitment" and "do not offer any value". Visitors also "see common ...


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Make it yours is the better option here for reasons already mentioned. But it's probably better vs. Contact Us, as opposed to being the ideal phrase. The user is not making it theirs by clicking this button, even though this language is more compelling than Contact Us. Contact Us is too generic and might also have a negative association, like when users are ...


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A/B testing is definitely the best way to answer your question. However, I agree that "Make it Yours" would encourage the user to move forward in your flow since it is contextually relevant. "Contact Us" is more conventional, but it is also generic. As a user, I'm not sure if this CTA actually has anything to do with the product I just configured. I could ...


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I personally prefer the Log In / Sign Up combination. My justification for this is that the Sign In and Sign Up will confuse people, it becomes harder for them to find what each button means unless they reach the end of the word. Log In is pretty standard and gets the job done and takea away the confusion as well.


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I think that this quite recent article (June 2014) about the "Sign Up" button is interesting. The author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212%. His thesis is that the standard "Sign Up" buttons don't work because "they ask for blind commitment" and "do not offer any value". Visitors also "see common elements repeated ...


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From what you've described of the user flow, "Make it yours" speaks to your user in the context she's in and clearly indicates the next step. Now, in your specific case the underlying question is: "Should I use a CTA with more casual/friendly language or direct language in this case?" and the truth is... we don't know for sure. The best way to find out ...


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Just by reading the "Make it yours" it already sounds more compelling than a generic contact us. A friendly and inviting language can be a great approach. The more transparent and human it is the better. From an user point of view I always find that when website use friendly and almost daring language, it tends to captivate me more than the most common ...


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What I believe is that taking the business name with every title has nothing to do with ux. This is more of SEO or content writer related question. However, relevant content is absolutely the highest priority to hold your users on the page. That said, I do believe in content strategy, well built web pages, understanding users, targeted market etc. I just ...


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I apologize for the lack of references, but in my opinion (and from viewing social websites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and the like) they rarely say 'Your' (even more rarely see 'My') unless it is to prompt the user. If your viewing a settings dropdown/spinner there is no difference to the user when you see 'Account' or 'My Account' or 'Your Account' ...


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Are you planning on having all of the email signature details in the image? If so I would recommend against it. It's a terrible idea because it's not even functional. None of the "links" are interactive. I wouldn't put much weight into have images in the signature.


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To answer your key question: yes, it is OK to include images in email signatures. You accepted the value of this approach in your own response: I understand the (perceived) marketing value of including accomplishment-type images in a signature. However, main pet peeves (yes, these are pet peeves because not everyone is equally bothered by embedded ...


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my company has had anniversaries Hey, mine too! But seriously, I don't recommend it. You hit the main points and they are very valid. someone in HR will ask everyone... HR is not marketing. Adding these "awards" and anniversaries is utterly useless to me as a client/customer. The awards have their place on a corporate website, but not in an email ...


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If they are on a mailing list then, get notified helps if there's the interest, however: Thank you for your interest, if you would like, we can register you early for access when the app is ready. Also, Thank's for registering in our newest product, please confirm your email and add us to your allowed list. We'll let you know when we let it shine. To ...


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Why not answer this question with science: Randomly show visitors one or the other, and see which one gets a higher rate of registration. Since you have a hypothesis that the waiting list concept could be an emotional pull, this could be perfect for an A/B test like this.


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I would prefer the first one.. "Get notified" etc. This is straight to the point and can easily be understood as "launch will happen soon. join in now" You could also use "Request an invite". For a more exclusive tone "Join the waiting list" may make it appear more attractive, but it also has a slight negative and longer timespan ring to it for some ...


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Following on from other posters I think a matrix applied at a role or application level would be the most appropriate way to create a single system for assigning type/importance to individual messages. I think you could develop a matrix that specifies colour and icon usage for each level: As others have mentioned these levels need to be applied at a role ...



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