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53

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


52

The idea of 'click here' being a bad idea originated from data about how people visually scan web pages which show that people don't read online: they skim the page to get the key information. If someone is scanning, 'click here' (particularly if there are lots of them!) links are totally meaningless in isolation: the user has to spend time reading around ...


47

Priority shouldn't be numbered or substituted with characters. Traditionally they've always been a label to instruct the end user what they represent. This is what we use. A combination for Color and Label or Icon and Label. For a user with accessibility or someone using a screen reader, the priority is read out as text. Ideally, there has to be a visual ...


11

It doesn't matter one bit. To get on my soapbox for a second, one of the biggest problems of non-professional UX is that people will read some article or other, containing some specialized advice or guidelines, with specific reasoning, appropriate for specific circumstances. But they won't remember any of the "specific" parts, they will just think that the ...


8

Using the word "you" should generally be reserved for descriptive texts that address the logged in user. For example, you would say "You have 1 task assigned to you" to illustrate that the user has a task pending, but in a grid of tasks and various status values, it would look more consistent to have the user's display name instead of just "you." If you ...


6

The idea of these sentences is to build TRUST and to feel PERSONAL Additionally there is the movement of being proud that a product was created in your country as a form of nationalism and content that the thing you are going to use/purchase created jobs and boosted the economy of your own country. Nothing more useable about it tho,besides maybe being ...


5

Here is a supplemental answer. Dont show priority with different colors! Use Different shades of the same color 8% of men are colorblind You can change the shade of a color to prioritize or show emphasis without introducing new colors. By altering shade you can show similar emphasis than introducing different colors. *note the other strategies such ...


5

I think how you have placed the hyperlink is fine. There are various rules out there for using hyperlinks on a sentence like Vitaly explained. Personally for me, if the link was to take me to a different page I'd expect the sentence to be constructed so that there is an explanation (e.g: "Those interested in Arts and Crafts, please Commit to") followed ...


4

There isn't any "better" solution to this which applies universally, but generally I would err on the use of "You" rather than the person's name when addressing them or referring to them when they are reading. Partly this is because I favour a casual form of address in applications, but there are some other reasons too: Tone "You" presents a more personal ...


3

That depends on whether the selection within each facet is mutually exclusive. So Author if you can only select one author; authors is you can select more then one. Respectively, this can be seen as whether category items use checkboxes vs radio buttons / links. Compare: To:


3

This is a content strategy questions and the answer would depend on the tone of your overall site. Some sites have spent a lot of time developing a "personality". So within that concept, if your site overall is a straight transnational (in, out, done) site it would be good to end with a message that fits that content model. Such as your typical, "Your order ...


3

It really depends on your site, who your customers are, and what they expect. One can conceive of a website as a medium in which "You, the store owner" are talking to "Me, the buyer." In that scenario a more personal scenario may work very well. In other cases (say Amazon) in which one knows there isn't a "person" on the other end it may not work as well. ...


3

While I am not aware of any specific research on text options for this functionality, two things come to mind: Imply meaning via context Are you able to adjust the overall layout? If so, I suggest moving the "Sort & Filter" box closer to the "175 Results" heading to imply via proximity that the sort/filter actions apply to the results. download ...


3

Store credit. Wallets are things you use in several stores. So for example if I get money from amazon to put in my wallet, I can go and spend it on ebay.com. But what you're describing is limited to just the website you're currently on, more like a coupon or gift certificate. In other words, not 'portable'.


2

All of this is documented by Google in their writing guidelines. http://www.google.com/design/spec/style/writing.html Use contractions, avoid exclamation marks, be brief, keep it simple, use numerals in place of words, avoid slang, use punctuation when writing more than one sentence, use easy to understand language.


2

You're wondering how to differentiate between two types of gift subscriptions: A one-time subscription. An automatically renewing subscription. In both cases, the subscription will go to a third party, as a gift. I can see that, at a glance, the two offers would seem similar or identical, which would be confusing until the user reads the description. ...


2

Edit: I think I misunderstood the question a bit. You're referring to credits and not the storage medium. In this case, Store credit makes more sense. To draw a parallel, you put "currency" in your physical wallet and not "wallet currency". Hence for an e-commerce setup, Store credit or credit would be the more appropriate term. Example - "You've received ...


2

Use Log in to avoid capture slips I would be very careful with the "common usage" argument. For example: the use of sign up and sign in has a very pleasant symmetry which doubtless appeals to many people. Unfortunately, this symmetry reduces the difference by which the user recognizes the button she needs to just two letters. It's very easy to click sign up ...


1

If the products sold in the e-commerce belong only to a company, you don't need to put the logo on it. Unless you don't want to cover the image with a logo, and for ecommerce, this is very bad because images are very important for users, I suggest to don't let others download your images. Just prevent the download of images, disabling the right click. Of ...


1

Honestly, if you're worrying about Authenticity, almost anyone can emulate the signature you have specified in the dialog box unless there is a unique code you have. A dialog box is a secondary window that prompts an exchange of information between the user and the program. As per the Design Guidelines for Dialog Boxes: Do not use customized dialog ...


1

Inspired by MonkeyZeus - you can group the categories to achieve an easier structured overview: View Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/o3mbryg6/


1

I would say that the most important one should be at the top. Maybe you should also make this visible throu color. An color with high saturation looks more important that one with less saturation You can also make things important by taking up more space and using bigher fonts. You can also use an ! as Symbol to mark things important. You can use more ...


1

I think it's key to take into account exactly what sort of UX is going on in the app. Some situations where "you" is definitely not appropriate: Signup form for a company, not an individual Management tool where the individual's settings are not the focus - eg. managing a calendar or an admin interface for a website Any interface where the admin is in a ...


1

For accessibility (screen readers, this is fine. (But less than 5% of the market for a general website) The reason "Here" and "Click Here" are bad is because they are useless words. They provide no context. This isn't an accessibility issue; it is a usability issue. There's an overwhelming amount of evidence that website visitors don't read, they scan. They ...


1

We have decided to go with "Need Attention" and "Archived". We tested it with our users and it works ok. We also tried "Active" before, but it was confusing, because the items we display can be "Active" and "Closed" regardless on their location in my app.


1

This is fun semantic debate, but at the end of the day if the context is interface copy for users — rather than documentation language — I don't think there can be one correct, universal term that transcends devices and languages. More importantly, the interface shouldn't have to explicitly say "click" or "tap" or "press". Our brains process visual ...


1

The problem with the term "User Experience" compared to "user friendly" is that it is too vague and too comprehensive (and perhaps too technical) for marketing purposes. The criticism (we professionals) raise against the "user friendly" term is exactly what makes it so marketing friendly: 1) We say that "you can't use that term because it only reflects a ...



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