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49

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


8

I would call them either "Approved" or "Active". Both are one word just like "Banned" and each conveys the positivity of their status. If pressed, I think I would lean toward "Approved" because you can have inactive approved users as well as active approved users. Here are multiple examples that show both are widely used: ...


4

We've had this discussion, and we settled on Active. Our deciding factor was that it's what Google uses on its services (attached image). Also, "Current" is a stronger indicator of someone being on the site "right now" rather than just active on the site in general. Image source


4

If you have a common default state, then you don't have to mark that default state. Instead you indicate when the state differs from the default. The default state of an item is "unarchived", so you it would be strange to have to relate a default state to a non-default state. It would be like marking files that haven't been deleted on your computer as ...


4

I would call them Current Users. With the context of Banned, it makes sense to me that the other tab would be non-banned users. If you wanted a view that was all the users together, you could make a third option that read All Users.


3

I use the "Active" status in my application to decipher the two. I'd recommend that you perform some quick method of user testing to get some hard data to drive your decision. Based on this article on writing microcopy, the author states: "...microcopy isn’t always obvious. Sometimes you have to hunt to find the right words. (or create an error ...


3

Both of your proposed messages look like they could become quite irritating quite quickly. A computer app can't realistically tell you it is "time to meditate", as it can't possibly know what you are doing at the time. I suggest something like this: "Feeling stressed? You last meditated x days ago. Meditation can help you xxx", where the xxx is a ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm biased, having worked as a dedicated UI text editor and writer on UX teams for 15 years (on top of several years of documentation experience). That said: ideally, there are trained content providers that work with PM, dev, design, and user experience teams to ensure that the UI text (control labels, messages, tooltips, instructional text ...


3

I think that this quite recent article (June 2014) about the "Sign Up" button is interesting. The author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212%. His thesis is that the standard "Sign Up" buttons don't work because "they ask for blind commitment" and "do not offer any value". Visitors also "see common elements repeated ...


2

To provide attribution by default. Both fair use legislation and the terms of use of many web sites allow reuse of short quotations elsewhere, so long as they're attributed to the original document. In theory, adding automatic attribution to the end of a quotation saves users from inadvertently plagiarizing/infringing by forgetting to manually add the ...


2

I personally prefer the Log In / Sign Up combination. My justification for this is that the Sign In and Sign Up will confuse people, it becomes harder for them to find what each button means unless they reach the end of the word. Log In is pretty standard and gets the job done and takea away the confusion as well.


2

Just by reading the "Make it yours" it already sounds more compelling than a generic contact us. A friendly and inviting language can be a great approach. The more transparent and human it is the better. From an user point of view I always find that when website use friendly and almost daring language, it tends to captivate me more than the most common ...


2

To answer your key question: yes, it is OK to include images in email signatures. You accepted the value of this approach in your own response: I understand the (perceived) marketing value of including accomplishment-type images in a signature. However, main pet peeves (yes, these are pet peeves because not everyone is equally bothered by embedded ...


2

I believe this is purely a matter of style (and there's some cultural aspect in play here as well - in some countries they are more common than in others). No doubt exclamation marks can be useful and appropriate in many cases, but they tend to lose their effect if used frequently; most style guides are firm on using them sparingly. Here're a few ...


2

I would recommend going with a simple approach like this download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I would recommend putting the archiving or withdrawing option as the primary call to action as you want that to be the primary interaction and not have the user be accidentally deleted. Since there is some confusion about ...


2

Yes. In fact, I would even word it as (in the case of a multi-file zip) "Preparing your files for download...". This tells the user why they have to wait, rather than just saying "shortly" which the users don't know how long that would be. If it's not too technically difficult, providing deterministic progress is always the ideal.


2

Issues with automatic downloads are often something that the person trying to download can't do anything about. Often corporations, universities, and schools disable many setting in browsers as part of their security settings, and an individual user has no way of changing those settings. So, if your web app is likely to be used in any environments like ...


2

You're wondering how to differentiate between two types of gift subscriptions: A one-time subscription. An automatically renewing subscription. In both cases, the subscription will go to a third party, as a gift. I can see that, at a glance, the two offers would seem similar or identical, which would be confusing until the user reads the description. ...


1

Whitelisted vs Blacklisted can be a good term...


1

We have decided to go with "Need Attention" and "Archived". We tested it with our users and it works ok. We also tried "Active" before, but it was confusing, because the items we display can be "Active" and "Closed" regardless on their location in my app.


1

Don't name the unnamed. Instead reference only the named. Leave Archive Close Archive View or something similar.


1

It depends on your audience, as different audiences tend to favor different language types (friendly, formal etc). I would considering specifying what is on each page as it can be confusing no matter how hard you try. For example assuming you have other options which can be changed you might have a list like this: Your details Login Credentials Payment ...


1

Summarizing the answers being provided, I think it is best practice to try and separate the actual item that you are trying to download and its status. That is, you would not use anything other than the text for the title, and you can choose from a number of different strategies to indicate its status: Icon to show download status, possibly including ...


1

This is a question of voice. How do you address the user across other channels (website, email, etc.)? Knowing and understand this will help determine the type of voice you wish to use in your messaging within the application. While I wouldn't consider this a UX question, I understand the potential experience impact. Short and sweet, use use your ...


1

I would recommend against it for the following two reasons The term FAQ has become synonymous with the part of the site where people can check out the commonly asked questions. To quote this wikipedia article The "FAQ" is an Internet textual tradition originating from the technical limitations of early mailing lists from NASA in the early 1980s. ...


1

I would use a radio button for this interaction. It allows you to default to the safer of the two actions. It also allows the user time to consider the two options and think about the difference before making a selection. Sort of verify before click rather than after. Keeps the interaction together on one page. For the wording I would use delete user and ...


1

In this case it sounds like one option is just an extension of the other (they both remove the user, but one also removes the archive record)... You could use a checkbox to confirm that second action. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You could also use a popup to accomplish the same thing... download bmml ...


1

From what you've described of the user flow, "Make it yours" speaks to your user in the context she's in and clearly indicates the next step. Now, in your specific case the underlying question is: "Should I use a CTA with more casual/friendly language or direct language in this case?" and the truth is... we don't know for sure. The best way to find out ...


1

Revisiting this question and having resolved my problems I see that there were two issues preventing an accepted answer. Firstly, the fault was mine - I don't think I formed the question well. I was asking something too specific whereas really I should have been taking a step back and looking at the documentation style as a whole. I shouldn't have asked ...


1

Ben's got a very good article on Writing Error Messages The 4 H’s of Writing Error Messages



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