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57

Let them know what has happened. Here are some situations with longer, clear example notifications that use proper English grammar: Only the name changed The task "foobar" has been successfully renamed to "dummy". Only the data changed The task "foobar" has been successfully updated. The name and the data changed The task "foobar" has been ...


40

If it's clear, say it in the least number of words possible. If there is no confusion, then there is no problem. "Import image" - clear. "Create app" - clear. "Add description" - clear. For further reading, I suggest the Android Writing Style.


31

A good error message should: Let you know what the problem is. Make you feel like there is something that you can do about it. Speak like a human, and be a consistent extension of the personality of the rest of the application. For generic error messages, you can't do much about the first point, but you can do something about the other two. Do something ...


29

In the team I am on, our idea on the matter is as follows: Continue is used when you're talking about a directed flow forward only. Continue implies that anything you've done hitherto will be saved, so that you can move forward in the workflow. Ideally in a Continue-based setup, there will be alternate ways to return to previous app states, if your design ...


20

I would go with Dropbox's approach. 'Choose files' is clear enough to tell you the action it performs and concise enough to fit within two words. 'Select files' also works. When labeling buttons, try to explain what the button does. Are choosing files and uploading two steps or a single step? Since in dropbox's case, you choose the files and then press ...


17

Some sites show this in the header to indicate a presumed identity for low risk actions (like add to wishlist), but you can't actually buy anything until you log into the site. So "log out" here would be misleading. Sometimes "Not John? Sign out." is shown as in place of 'sign out' when properly signed in. This is simply a more human way of speaking to ...


17

If you are writing prose, a . (full stop) is there to show a the end of a sentence so that you know when the next one starts. If you only have one sentence, then it isn't strictly necessary for clarity. Hence, if it's a short notification message of only one sentence, you can leave it out. That said you should keep to the style guides given for your ...


12

Naming it "sign out" is actually missing something important; clicking "not Bob" doesn't just sign you out of Amazon, it presents the page to sign in. So you're not really just signing out, you're signing back in as someone different; because you're not Bob, you're Alice. I think this is an important distinction from the current answers; you're doing more ...


10

You should limit the label to some action word if possible. This also makes it easier if you want to replace the label with an icon. Add Create Import And if the context is ambiguous, add a descriptor. Image Contact Description There are cases where you might want to skip the action and directly use the descriptors. Eg: for login, many sites just ...


10

It's terrible UX, and should be avoided. As a customer, if I highlight some text and copy it, and you thin insert some other text, you are spamming me. I didn't ask for that text, and at no point was I asked if that is what I want to copy. One of the most basic principles of UX is that any common action should respond in a predictable way. "Cancel" ...


10

I would definitely not go with 'Short News' since it implies the news story is short. Which, from what I see, is not the case. You click on the item to be redirected to the complete article. 'Top News' seems like a fairly simple to understand and generic enough term to cover this. Other alternatives include 'Trending News', 'Latest Stories', 'Featured ...


9

A lot depends on your audience and your product, but in general the term "Millions of colours" isn't particularly helpful. Do you mean 2 million or 786 million? If you're selling a new DSLR camera, the common jargon is 12-bit, 14-bit, etc. and not the number of colours - so that is what you should stick to. If you're talking about software (especially ...


8

I would describe the options in terms of "quality", with technical footnotes. This teaches the user at a high level what a phrase like 16 bit vs 32 bit means. It also provides the information for more technically minded users to get exactly what they want. Color Example: Low Quality (8 bit) Medium Quality (16 bit) High Quality (32 bit) Audio Example: ...


8

I would probably call this a News ticker. I think it fits very nicely with the case you describe. On the left hand side you've got longer news articles and posts. The column on the right has shorter, brief news. Facebook uses the term 'Ticker' for the brief news that are displayed on the right side of the screen in the desktop version. Basically all ...


7

It makes perfect sense for shipping, as that's a benefit you are providing your customer. But also listing it for taxes seems to dilute the benefit of the term for shipping--after all, not charging taxes is not a benefit you are directly providing the customer (it's something the customer's local government is doing). I'd suggest sticking with numbers ...


6

A placeholder is an efficient tool for teaching what your user is going to do next without spoon-feeding him. The key of success here is to give an answer to the question: What am I gonna to do next, how and why? As this could be a lot of information, it's okay to split the answer on multiple dialogs. An example: If you want to get the user's profile image, ...


6

I would steer away from using "news" at all. Try simply "Latest" as the title. Or, if you have some statistical engine that makes popular or trending topics bubble to the top, use "Trending" or "Popular." The content of that section may include "proper" journalistic news, but it may also contain a blog post, tweet or other social update. We as Web users ...


6

In most cases it's preferable to use numerals. Numerals have a number of advantages that aid readability: It's more compact for large numbers (three thousand three hundred and thirty three). They stand out among text, which is beneficial because numbers tend to be a key element in a text. I've got ten marbles. I've got 10 marbles. The word ten is as ...


6

There's a few discussions on it already around the web. They are very similar. 'Preferences' usually control the settings of your personal favorites -- things of little consequence -- like color of font, type size, background photo... -- usually personal prefences. The tern 'settings' is much broader and can impact system issues -- ram size, ...


6

If you check "standard" login screens, like one Mac OSX or Android you can see that they usually don't rely on any headline at all. That's why I'd go with a simple "Suggested users:" as headline for the user list. In case somebody finds it too big-brotherish, you could add a small explanation on a secondary screen ("Who suggested these users?", or something ...


5

The Apple terminology dates back to a time when the options in the list were: Black & White 4 16 256 Later, it changed to: 256 Thousands Millions The amount of millions doesn't matter for two reasons: The number is really a relative measure of size and is presented in sequence with others like it. "Millions of colours" in isolation isn't ...


5

There are two different activities.... 1. Changing the details of a task and 2. Changing the task name itself. If details of task are changed, 'The task "foobar" has been successfully updated' is the message suitable. If the task name itself is changed, 'The task "foobar" has been successfully renamed to "dummy"' is the message suitable.


5

I found an interesting trend: "Expiry" is a UK style and "Expiration" is an American style.* Personally, I tend to use the terms interchangeably and unless your users are limited to any one of the two countries, you should be fine. [*] - Both words exist in both languages UK English and US English, it is just the prevalent usage that is seemingly a bit ...


5

Some points for good labeling are: Short – 'submitted' vs 'uploaded_for_processing' Distinguishable from each other – bad: 'uploading' and 'uploaded', good: 'uploading' and 'submitted' Same styling rules – try not to mix verbs and nouns and use same case Understandable – user should know business process to match labels in UI to business phases For ...


5

I would recommend not to name the block after the some visual attributes, i.e. "Short News", "Green Block", etc. This features already perceived by users. It's better to reflect functional (what it does) or semantic features (what is it for). Here you can use labels from formal "External News" to less formal but still meaningful "News of the World" ...


5

Attention to microcopy is very important! (See footnote) The fragment phrase X axis is two words where axis is the noun and X is the descriptor (or qualifier) that specifies which axis you are talking about. Meanwhile x-axis is one (albeit hyphenated) noun by which that particular axis is called. So a valid sentence might be: The X axis is called the ...


5

From a user (non-programmer's) perspective. There's a difference between creating something and editing (updating) something. It's probably better to show this difference in button labels. This may be a stylistic thing, but if there's room for a longer label, I tend to use "Create Item" as oppose to "Create" so the action is crystal clear. This also makes ...


4

My approach to this is completely style-guide oriented. The online Oxford Guide Style states: The general rule is not to use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. The book itself states: Capitalize the first letter of headings and captions. So it appears Sentence Case is the way to go, event for captions.


4

You would have to test with your audience, but I would opt for symbols where they are clear to most people. For anything numerical, X > Y is clear. I can't speak for all cultures, but I covered this in grade 4 at school, so I would assume the majority of people have at least this level of mathematical understanding. I would also opt to do the same for ...


4

Depending on the tone of the application you can use something like: "Oops! Something went wrong." - Send error report to help us improve your experience "The application has encountered an unknown error." - Send error report for diagnosis. Google chrome uses a generic error: " Google Chrome quit unexpectedly." - Ignore, Report or Reopen. You can follow ...



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