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51

The idea of 'click here' being a bad idea originated from data about how people visually scan web pages which show that people don't read online: they skim the page to get the key information. If someone is scanning, 'click here' (particularly if there are lots of them!) links are totally meaningless in isolation: the user has to spend time reading around ...


50

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


46

Priority shouldn't be numbered or substituted with characters. Traditionally they've always been a label to instruct the end user what they represent. This is what we use. A combination for Color and Label or Icon and Label. For a user with accessibility or someone using a screen reader, the priority is read out as text. Ideally, there has to be a visual ...


11

It doesn't matter one bit. To get on my soapbox for a second, one of the biggest problems of non-professional UX is that people will read some article or other, containing some specialized advice or guidelines, with specific reasoning, appropriate for specific circumstances. But they won't remember any of the "specific" parts, they will just think that the ...


8

I would call them either "Approved" or "Active". Both are one word just like "Banned" and each conveys the positivity of their status. If pressed, I think I would lean toward "Approved" because you can have inactive approved users as well as active approved users. Here are multiple examples that show both are widely used: ...


7

Using the word "you" should generally be reserved for descriptive texts that address the logged in user. For example, you would say "You have 1 task assigned to you" to illustrate that the user has a task pending, but in a grid of tasks and various status values, it would look more consistent to have the user's display name instead of just "you." If you ...


5

I think how you have placed the hyperlink is fine. There are various rules out there for using hyperlinks on a sentence like Vitaly explained. Personally for me, if the link was to take me to a different page I'd expect the sentence to be constructed so that there is an explanation (e.g: "Those interested in Arts and Crafts, please Commit to") followed ...


5

Here is a supplemental answer. Dont show priority with different colors! Use Different shades of the same color 8% of men are colorblind You can change the shade of a color to prioritize or show emphasis without introducing new colors. By altering shade you can show similar emphasis than introducing different colors. *note the other strategies such ...


4

If you have a common default state, then you don't have to mark that default state. Instead you indicate when the state differs from the default. The default state of an item is "unarchived", so you it would be strange to have to relate a default state to a non-default state. It would be like marking files that haven't been deleted on your computer as ...


4

I would call them Current Users. With the context of Banned, it makes sense to me that the other tab would be non-banned users. If you wanted a view that was all the users together, you could make a third option that read All Users.


4

We've had this discussion, and we settled on Active. Our deciding factor was that it's what Google uses on its services (attached image). Also, "Current" is a stronger indicator of someone being on the site "right now" rather than just active on the site in general. Image source


4

There isn't any "better" solution to this which applies universally, but generally I would err on the use of "You" rather than the person's name when addressing them or referring to them when they are reading. Partly this is because I favour a casual form of address in applications, but there are some other reasons too: Tone "You" presents a more personal ...


3

I use the "Active" status in my application to decipher the two. I'd recommend that you perform some quick method of user testing to get some hard data to drive your decision. Based on this article on writing microcopy, the author states: "...microcopy isn’t always obvious. Sometimes you have to hunt to find the right words. (or create an error ...


3

Both of your proposed messages look like they could become quite irritating quite quickly. A computer app can't realistically tell you it is "time to meditate", as it can't possibly know what you are doing at the time. I suggest something like this: "Feeling stressed? You last meditated x days ago. Meditation can help you xxx", where the xxx is a ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm biased, having worked as a dedicated UI text editor and writer on UX teams for 15 years (on top of several years of documentation experience). That said: ideally, there are trained content providers that work with PM, dev, design, and user experience teams to ensure that the UI text (control labels, messages, tooltips, instructional text ...


3

Store credit. Wallets are things you use in several stores. So for example if I get money from amazon to put in my wallet, I can go and spend it on ebay.com. But what you're describing is limited to just the website you're currently on, more like a coupon or gift certificate. In other words, not 'portable'.


3

It really depends on your site, who your customers are, and what they expect. One can conceive of a website as a medium in which "You, the store owner" are talking to "Me, the buyer." In that scenario a more personal scenario may work very well. In other cases (say Amazon) in which one knows there isn't a "person" on the other end it may not work as well. ...


3

This is a content strategy questions and the answer would depend on the tone of your overall site. Some sites have spent a lot of time developing a "personality". So within that concept, if your site overall is a straight transnational (in, out, done) site it would be good to end with a message that fits that content model. Such as your typical, "Your order ...


2

To provide attribution by default. Both fair use legislation and the terms of use of many web sites allow reuse of short quotations elsewhere, so long as they're attributed to the original document. In theory, adding automatic attribution to the end of a quotation saves users from inadvertently plagiarizing/infringing by forgetting to manually add the ...


2

I would recommend going with a simple approach like this download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I would recommend putting the archiving or withdrawing option as the primary call to action as you want that to be the primary interaction and not have the user be accidentally deleted. Since there is some confusion about ...


2

I believe this is purely a matter of style (and there's some cultural aspect in play here as well - in some countries they are more common than in others). No doubt exclamation marks can be useful and appropriate in many cases, but they tend to lose their effect if used frequently; most style guides are firm on using them sparingly. Here're a few ...


2

Issues with automatic downloads are often something that the person trying to download can't do anything about. Often corporations, universities, and schools disable many setting in browsers as part of their security settings, and an individual user has no way of changing those settings. So, if your web app is likely to be used in any environments like ...


2

Yes. In fact, I would even word it as (in the case of a multi-file zip) "Preparing your files for download...". This tells the user why they have to wait, rather than just saying "shortly" which the users don't know how long that would be. If it's not too technically difficult, providing deterministic progress is always the ideal.


2

You're wondering how to differentiate between two types of gift subscriptions: A one-time subscription. An automatically renewing subscription. In both cases, the subscription will go to a third party, as a gift. I can see that, at a glance, the two offers would seem similar or identical, which would be confusing until the user reads the description. ...


1

For accessibility (screen readers, this is fine. (But less than 5% of the market for a general website) The reason "Here" and "Click Here" are bad is because they are useless words. They provide no context. This isn't an accessibility issue; it is a usability issue. There's an overwhelming amount of evidence that website visitors don't read, they scan. They ...


1

It really does depend on your users and their context using your software. Unless the concept of "being live" is well understood for the users (because they have learned what it means by using your app), I think you need to find a better way of phrasing it. I'd consider: thinking about other ways to phrase it and doing usability testing when you talk ...


1

Whitelisted vs Blacklisted can be a good term...


1

We have decided to go with "Need Attention" and "Archived". We tested it with our users and it works ok. We also tried "Active" before, but it was confusing, because the items we display can be "Active" and "Closed" regardless on their location in my app.


1

Don't name the unnamed. Instead reference only the named. Leave Archive Close Archive View or something similar.


1

It depends on your audience, as different audiences tend to favor different language types (friendly, formal etc). I would considering specifying what is on each page as it can be confusing no matter how hard you try. For example assuming you have other options which can be changed you might have a list like this: Your details Login Credentials Payment ...



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