Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

85

"Like" is Facebook's creation and is strongly associated with Facebook. +1 is Google+'s creation and is totally associated with its brand. Thinking out of the box... It seems your functionality is not exactly the same as "liking". It's more "like & follow". There is no single word for that, so alternatively you could invent your own vocabulary. ...


49

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


47

Personally I like love which is often represented by an icon of a heart and popular in social media. Then you dont have to write the word love but simply use the heart. But if you don't like the heart icon, you can always find a synonym from Thesaurus.com:


27

What about Star? Google Reader did this and it was pretty clear it went into the Starred Items folder and your friends would also see you starred an item; it also served to bookmark. The other thing I was just thinking is that unless you told people, no matter what term you used it would still be unclear you "liked" that user. That seems totally different ...


25

Not according to Microsoft. Use title-style capitalization, without ending punctuation. Source: Microsoft Guidelines for Windows, section about error messages.


20

I think "Favourite" is the nicest commonly used internet term that encompasses the ideas of "like" and "bookmark".


16

My answer would be to synopsis the question of the modal form, so with the question being: You are leaving the question with unsaved changes The title would be: "Unsaved Changes" It's a pattern I've seen and used regularly, it's brief and informative.


10

This area is normally giving you information on the type of question being asked (at least in my experience), so the question mark feels like the dialog is questioning itself. I'm a "Save Changes" dialog... or am I?


9

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


9

I think there are a couple that you could use that have good iconography: Pound It! or Fist Bump It! and (in my best Borat voice) High Five! Important Note: When you click the high five icon it should always play the corresponding sound!


8

Have you heard about reactions? You can see how Fastcompany.com is using it on some of their blogposts and the full documentation of it here: http://www.readrboard.com/. I've take a look at it and responding to your question, this technology allows your users or visitors to select the type of impression they have about what they are reading/viewing. I ...


8

I would call them either "Approved" or "Active". Both are one word just like "Banned" and each conveys the positivity of their status. If pressed, I think I would lean toward "Approved" because you can have inactive approved users as well as active approved users. Here are multiple examples that show both are widely used: ...


6

This is very interesting and immediately reminds me of Pinterest. Pinterest has two different actions one called "Pin", which basically bookmarks that item, which most of us can assume that if you are pinning something then you also like it. However, Pinterest also has an option to like a pin. Why would you need the option to have both, when would you want ...


5

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


4

You'll find that nearly without exception, question form in modals is little appropriate. On content vs interaction Probably to core duality in all interfaces is the that of content and interaction. Respectively, what you can see and what you can do. Cognitively, these are mapped to (so to speak) two cognitive processes - interpretation and action, which ...


4

Changing the perspective can open other options. Taking the user's perspective and benefit as the primary lens, you can come up with words like : keep save collect These words tell you about the value for you as a user and change the focus that is often put onto the contents themselves which eventually get the benefit of the user's action (distinction, ...


4

If you have a common default state, then you don't have to mark that default state. Instead you indicate when the state differs from the default. The default state of an item is "unarchived", so you it would be strange to have to relate a default state to a non-default state. It would be like marking files that haven't been deleted on your computer as ...


4

I would call them Current Users. With the context of Banned, it makes sense to me that the other tab would be non-banned users. If you wanted a view that was all the users together, you could make a third option that read All Users.


4

We've had this discussion, and we settled on Active. Our deciding factor was that it's what Google uses on its services (attached image). Also, "Current" is a stronger indicator of someone being on the site "right now" rather than just active on the site in general. Image source


3

What is the utility to 'liking' items, in respect to your product context & brand? Think of a verb that reinforces the brand: If you have an academic product, you might choose "cite" If it's a competitive scenario, choose "promote" These are just a couple simple examples


3

Maybe you can come up with a phenomenon taken from the context of your app. Take Pinterest as an example, where you "pin" something on you pinboard. Is there some action in the real world that would reflect what you are trying to do? It is a bit hard to come up with something without the context of your app, but if we are to keep it a bit more general here ...


3

I have used "Recommend" for forum posts in the past, and simply displaying the number of recommendations in a button next to each post. Rolling over the post adds "Recommendations: " in front of the button to explain it a little. It appears to work well - I appreciate not exactly the same use-case as yours, but you might like it.


3

Microsoft doesn't always have the correct answer, but they do set the standard. In this case, I think the question is lost if it's in the title bar. I would probably phrase the text like this: Title: Save Progress Text: You have unsaved changes on this page. Would you like to save them now?


3

I think that this quite recent article (June 2014) about the "Sign Up" button is interesting. The author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212%. His thesis is that the standard "Sign Up" buttons don't work because "they ask for blind commitment" and "do not offer any value". Visitors also "see common elements repeated ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm biased, having worked as a dedicated UI text editor and writer on UX teams for 15 years (on top of several years of documentation experience). That said: ideally, there are trained content providers that work with PM, dev, design, and user experience teams to ensure that the UI text (control labels, messages, tooltips, instructional text ...


3

I would argue that the most accurate word besides menu would be "navigation". Shortening it to nav might be alienating for a less tech-literate audience. But stay aware of innovating for the sake of innovation."Menu" is a metaphor that is pretty well-established and has taken years for users to internalize. On one hand I think it is important to stay ...


3

Both of your proposed messages look like they could become quite irritating quite quickly. A computer app can't realistically tell you it is "time to meditate", as it can't possibly know what you are doing at the time. I suggest something like this: "Feeling stressed? You last meditated x days ago. Meditation can help you xxx", where the xxx is a ...


3

I use the "Active" status in my application to decipher the two. I'd recommend that you perform some quick method of user testing to get some hard data to drive your decision. Based on this article on writing microcopy, the author states: "...microcopy isn’t always obvious. Sometimes you have to hunt to find the right words. (or create an error ...


2

To provide attribution by default. Both fair use legislation and the terms of use of many web sites allow reuse of short quotations elsewhere, so long as they're attributed to the original document. In theory, adding automatic attribution to the end of a quotation saves users from inadvertently plagiarizing/infringing by forgetting to manually add the ...


2

I personally prefer the Log In / Sign Up combination. My justification for this is that the Sign In and Sign Up will confuse people, it becomes harder for them to find what each button means unless they reach the end of the word. Log In is pretty standard and gets the job done and takea away the confusion as well.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible