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13

A poke around Google suggests that most guides on usage of the symbol agree with your intuition. This article emphasizes that you should use a non-breaking space to avoid the symbol and the copyright holder being on two different lines or pages. Their reasoning is as follows: Must you put a space af­ter the copy­right sym­bol? No, but se­man­ti­cal­ly, ...


8

Apple uses the legal concept of 'trade dress' to argue for look and feel infringements in which one could argue that UX (or, more specifically, UI) can come in to play. Alas, there aren't any particular clear rules. IP law is gray, and often determined by those with the most lawyers. Add to it things like modern US patent law, for example, where it is ...


7

After thinking about this a bit more, I believe we should be able to use the icon, if it is registered against the file type on the end-users machine. So, if they've got the standard word icon registered against the .doc file extension on their machine, they should see the standard word icon in our application, and we could achieve this by querying windows ...


3

I've never seen the sign without a space after it, but anyway, in the chapter on copyrights, the Oxford Guide to Style has a space after the symbol. It is perhaps worth mentioning that the symbol is not a requirement, nor does it have any legal significance. Legacy has it that it is used to denote a copyrighted material.


2

The usability of the copyright can be co-related to the fact that it sends a sense of authenticity to the users. If we don't see any such message, we tend to be suspicious. So, I can say over a time, our mental model has become like that and trust the site (one of the factors of many) when see copyright stuff


2

According to Wikipedia copyright is: Generally, it is "the right to copy", but also gives the copyright holder the right to be credited for the work, to determine who may adapt the work to other forms, who may perform the work, who may financially benefit from it, and other related rights. It is an intellectual property form (like the patent, the ...


2

I presume you mean "is UX protectable in its own right", whether by copyright or trademark or any other means? In the US certain user experiences in software are patented. Naturally they must be novel and an invention in their own rights, but the famous kinetic scroll/elastic snapback behaviour the iPhone used was patented (I'm on my phone so it's a hassle ...


2

The typical form is: Copyright (c) <years> <copyright holder>. It's typically followed by a statement describing the claims (e.g. "All rights reserved.") Common variations: The word "Copyright" is often left out in less formal contexts Sometimes (but rarely) the year(s) are left out (c) vs © Sometimes there is a comma after the years, ...


1

Could you be more clear about the information you have to order? And in what context will it be placed? What is above the footer? Why is the developers name in the footer? Is years the developer's age, work experience or time since subscribing? You could treat it like any other source citing. Wikipedia uses the following format: Ritter, Ron. The Oxford ...



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