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I don't like to generalize for topics like that. I would definitely say that it depends on the information that the vertical menu presents. In e-commerce websites, most of the times, a horizontal menu is used for bigger e-shops. Personally, I think that the left navigation is waste of space. The main requirement is to leave the user undistracted to focus ...


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With all my projects the main reason is laws. In EU, you're required by law to get the users' informed and active consent before storing or accessing any kind of personal data. The ePrivacy directive – more specifically Article 5(3) – requires prior informed consent for storage ofor access to information stored on a user's terminal equipment. ...


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Although it may seem useful that inline validation for pre filled form fields is ok, it depends on the kind of field that you are addressing. If the address fields are not critical to further information from the user, then you can use the green validation. Else it might be better to let the user validate the information.


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It comes down to two related things: Ownership of action Trust The first of these is about the owner of the site wanting you to stop and notice the thing you're agreeing to, rather than just blindly agreeing. They know full well that the user probably hasn't read the terms, and is probably agreeing blindly to the T&Cs... but by forcing the user to ...


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The reason why is that by law (and its fuzzy) people have to have enough to show that they can't accidentally accept terms, usually when payment or providing personal information is involved. So if I sign up for a newsletter on Kickstarter, no big deal. But if I agree to pay $50 for a Garfield poster...a bit more consent is needed. The reason it's fuzzy is ...



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