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139

Almost all of the testing I've managed has proven that content delivered via carousels are missed by most users. Few interact with them and many comment that they look like adverts — we've witnessed the banner blindness concept in full effect. In terms of space saving and content promotion, a lot of competing messages get delivered in a single position that ...


119

Carousels are effective at being able to tell people in marketing/senior management that their latest idea is now on the home page. They are next to useless for users and often "skipped" because they look like advertisements. Hence they are a good technique for getting useless information on a home page (see first sentence of this post). In summary, use ...


72

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


46

In all the testing I have done, home page carousels are completely ineffective. For one, anything beyond the initial view has a huge decrease in visitor interaction. And two, the chances that the information being displayed in the carousel matches what the visitor is looking for is slim. So in that case the carousel becomes a very large banner that gets ...


42

As a user I find carousels faintly annoying: Most have usability fail which I fall into the categories described in this article: 5 Big Usability Mistakes Designers Make on Carousels No ability to bookmark a particular item on the carousel, for example take a look at the BBC News photo carousel they use: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14619799 ...


39

I do not use or suggest the use of carousels. The changing of images can distract users when they read text on the page. You might find some interesting information at http://digitaleskimo.tumblr.com/post/752912498/image-carousel-appropriateness http://blinkux.com/insights/newsletter/usability-highlights-2008/ does not dispute the use or causeless, but ...


33

Some research into Carousels usage on University of Notre Dame website has some interesting findings: Approximately 1% of visitors click on a feature. There was a total of 28,928 clicks on features for this time period. The feature was manually "switched/rotated" a total of 315,665 times. Of these clicks, 84% were on stories in position 1 with the rest ...


27

Pop-unders suck. The Internet has been awash with hate for them since their inception. But you know that, you need data. Research has shown that pop-under ads are almost indistinguishable from pop-up ads (pdf source), and are actually worse than pop-up ads in terms of intrusiveness in tests vs in-line ads. Emphasis mine: Pop-under ads were ...


19

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


18

We have built these for clients in the past with the main driving force being SEO. (Carousel images with text / links overlayed). They are a way to cram a lot of content onto the main homepage without looking like you are 'gaming' the search engines or keyword stuffing. We do try to make them as efficient and usable as possible, but they are requested by ...


15

I'd say this isn't a dark pattern at all. The simplest definition of a Dark Pattern is design meant to trick people. Now, there can be good tricks too, so Dark Patterns are really about deceiving users into doing something that benefits your business goals but not them. There's no trickery here. They clearly present what they want you to do (Tweet), how to ...


15

I have read up on this a bit, and it seems that my answer will contradict some of the things that have already been mentioned. My sources are all academic, and as such reflect the use of on-line surveys for conducting experiments. Feel free to read the sources that I link to, and draw your own conclusions. I mention some peripheral work as it relates to ...


13

Standard Progressive Disclosure should start at the simplest, least intrusive information first. Maybe even consider allowing users to put off answering some parts of the form (this will probably reduce completion rate of the "extra" fields but increase the completion rate of the start of the survey). But if you must do it all in one go, I'd generally ...


12

Every time I have seen them, they have been poorly done and looked suspicious to me. I just assume that there is something sinister going on like key logging or something like that (not even sure if that's possible but I err on the side of caution). I often think that the reason they are behind the window is so that they can do whatever they need to do ...


12

few thoughts general idea is: users click on/go for things that they immediately see they will benefit from contrary, users don't go for something that isn't clear (why would I do that?) by putting screenshots you are uncovering very essence of what's inside, and here is when you have to be 100% sure it doesn't suck, if a user sees that's cool, they will ...


12

I would do it like this. First, divide the process into two phases: First step, in which you require relatively low engagement from the user with relatively high profit for him. Second step, in which the user is already anchored on the promise of profit you have given him in the first step, so he will be more interested in a putting little bit more effort ...


11

Lack of reviews certainly looks like lack of activity, I would personally recommend taking advantage of the "0 reviews" situation. Instead of just displaying that you could have a little label that says something like "No reviews yet; be the first to Review!" Or maybe just "Own this product? Write a review!" if you want to not draw attention to the fact that ...


11

Yes, it's a dark pattern, because the website advertises it as free: But when you follow the link, then you find out it's not quite free - they want you to advertise their product. So it's a bait-and-switch. It advertises as if it is freeware, makes you psychologically commit by clicking onto "The Bricks" for more info. And then you find out that it's ...


10

Pop up notifications, like the ones used in Gmail and here on StackExchange might be a good way to get your message across. The method used on StackExchange is especially relevant because it offers information that is site specific, and often how to make ones experience on the StackExchange better. Since your message: "You were looking for XY, if ...


10

Wow, nice and interesting question! Personally I would consider that this rather depends on a person's philosophy and is more or less a morality issue. If dark patterns could do harm (financially, whatever), I am not sure this could be measured in an explicit way. The examples you gave, e.g. misleading ads, could IMO be very different from emails that ...


10

We are naturally drawn to movement, so shaking any button will cause people to notice it more. That however is not necessarily a good thing. It isn't someone noticing it in a good way. You are very likely to annoy or people who are getting their attention drawn to something that they may not want to be looking at. Think of those annoying banner adds that ...


10

In psychology there is a lot of research into whether primacy (first presented) or recency (most recently presented) most affects the choices that people will make. To cut through a lot of theory, in most cases primacy dominates - especially when the choices are presented very close to each other in time. So if you want someone to go for a particular ...


10

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


9

I think carousels can be effective as long as they give control to the user. That is, they can skip ahead, direct the flow, know where they are in the carousel, and turn off an auto-play function. Here is more on this idea: http://uxmovement.com/navigation/big-usability-mistakes-designers-make-on-carousels/


9

I can't do any better than to point you to Ian McAllister's answer to this question on Quora (Ian works for Amazon.com, and was previously in charge of the Wish List and registry features). In part, he says: There are a number of different use cases for Wish List. Some will drive incremental sales, and some may or may not. Same-session holding area ...


9

This study seems to address your concerns exactly: http://interruptions.net/literature/McCoy-HCIRMIS04.pdf Here's the abstract: Pop-up, pop-under, and in-line ads have been said to be intrusive, and previous findings suggest that they could have important effects on user perception and cognition. Using a 2x2 factorial design, this experimental ...


9

This is a strategy usually followed by companies that follow price discrimination as a strategy. This could be because: The cost of providing that product actually depends (usually statistically) on who is asking for it. Think of insurance companies here, where a healthy 18 year old with no history of medical problems is likely to cost a lot less to ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


8

This sounds like a good opportunity for A/B testing - try all these variations and see which one gets the best results for the site's particular products and customers.


8

I know you said in your question that removing fields isn't an option, but that's the way to increase conversion, Luke W even says so. There are some fields that seem ripe for it - Salutation Do you need both job title and job role? You're collecting zip, city, state, and country, but not street address? If you're not sending them mail, then Country and ...



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