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20

Stripe.com (a payments processor) offers an even more "immediate" sign-up process - they allow you to skip it all together. Any guest can begin using their dashboard and begin customising settings, testing mock transactions and making customer profiles before entering any sign-up information. No username, password or email. It's only when you want to go live ...


5

This is pretty common (from experience) - and there are a few common reasons: couldn't identify the download link didn't realise they needed to click the link but expected some magic to provide the file browser/user failed to click the link user got distracted "Oooh - look, a youtube video of cats" user found an alternative in another tab and downloaded it ...


4

I've drawn the diagram which could give you some insights. So your task is to design flow, that leads user to a decision point. Some acquired value and good experience before asking to Sign Up could create relation to a product or service and loss aversion effect. Still, if it isn't gained yet, user has a second chance. The moment of decision making can ...


3

I think buttons are better as well because it gives the user a full understanding of what sizes are available and how the garment is sized just at a glance. For example, a dress can be sized with letters (XS, S, M...) or numbers (00, 0, 2, 4), and all sizes might not be offered (XS, 00). Even if your sizing is generally consistent, it's still helpful to ...


3

If the CEO is someone I can relate to, think is funny or important figure who make substantial contributions to help organizations, then yes. If the CEO is a family member or a friend, then yes, but she would probably not be friend or family member to the majority of others. If the CEO is funny, like Conan O'Brian or Will Ferrel. If the CEO acts like ...


3

The ecommerce company I work for uses modals (pop-ups) to show a quick view of products. Google Analytics doesn't detect this interaction (no trigger was set on it either) so I don't have any data of people who click on the quickview vs. people who navigate to the products detail page. After implementation the effect of it (on conversion rates or something ...


2

I agree with BrianN's answer: skip the registration-first step. Here is an extended explanation of why this works best, which I feel complements his answer. You defined one of your goals as "get them signed up". But as a normal, white-hat business, this is not really your goal. Your goal is to get them to become regular users, whatever the definition of ...


2

OAuth With OAuth (facebook, twitter, Gmail intergration) you can grab the user's email address from whatever service you used to sign them up from and allow them to change it of they want and then they press save. That way, if the OAuth service provider decides to charge or discontinues the service you still have an email address that the user account is ...


2

I looked around the site and saw that you have a huge selection. Unfortunately, you only have one information hierarchy to help customers find a particular costume. A "Search" box will go a long way to helping people stay on the site searching for costumes. In addition, another set of links at the bottom of the page might be helpful with options like "Maybe ...


2

In my opinion, I will break this down into 3 part. First form will require the person's personal info such as the name and contacts. After the user complete the form, then prompt the other 2. This will effectively reduce the cluttering on the screen. The choice of using a list over a drop down as it's easier to view all. You might want to add in Location ...


1

I think in the examples that you have provided the 'ghost' buttons actually do a pretty good job of balancing the weight of the content versus the need to create a call-to-action for the user. In terms of the visual design, I think there is enough done with the weight of the lines around the buttons and the differentiation from other screen elements for ...


1

I think you should aim to create something prototypical to similar successful e-commerce sites. Take a look at the information displayed on their product pages and make notes or a data set on the elements displayed and where they are generally displayed. This doesn't mean that you have to make something boring -- instead you're looking to build an interface ...


1

That real estate on the website is not as valuable as you think it is. Users expect navigation at the top so they can explore the site. Users eyes tend to go down the left side and across the middle, which is why most sites use a promo image slider just below the top navigation. This is an interesting article about the f-layout and zigzag ( ...


1

Actually quick view doesn't change any conversion rates. If anything, quick view helps save user bandwidth and time. It becomes very cumbersome for the user to goto the product page only to find out that the product is not something that they like. So, quick view might decrease the page views or click rate but not conversion rates. If the products are good, ...


1

When you're into web analytics, you need to understand what you're measuring. Not only can it be wrong of you just focusing on convention rates, but also bad for business. Why? You may rightfully ask. Conversion rate is one of many measurements you can do on a site, which is the number of wanted actions per visitor. Now is 10 percent good? One? One tenth? ...


1

Forgive me for answering with questions. 1. From the home page, click "sign up" (you are emailed a confirmation email at this time) How does it email you before it knows your email address? And why would a user want to "sign up" when they don't know anything about your site yet? 2. On sign up form, simple enter email address and click submit Why ...


1

3 steps could be simplified here. 1- Have the e-mail form on the homepage itself. It would be unobtrusive, but saves the extra click and step 2- Consider skipping the need for e-mail confirmation before you can use the app. Confirm it after they've started using it instead. You could still ask them to set a password at the confirmation stage "To be able to ...


1

My personal rule of thumb for simplifying a website's chrome (header, footer, navigational items) is do it whenever it makes sense. Amazon was one of the first to do it because they understand that conversions increase the less chances users have to exit the process with other links. Bred out of necessity, simplifying or even header a website's chrome ...



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