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43

Be a voter > Vote now Christopher Bryan and Gregory Walton (2011) conducted a study for understanding if using a noun or verb statement have an influence on user motivation. According to the results of their study, participants in noun group expressed significantly more interest, 62.5%, in registering vote than participants in the verb group, 38.9%. ...


23

Marketing = UX… There is a remarkable amount of overlap between modern marketing and UX. Marketing is more than advertising and sales. It also includes market research, which identifies what would be useful, valuable, and desirable to consumers. Modern marketing also participates in developing the products themselves, ensuring they meet their target “value ...


20

Stripe.com (a payments processor) offers an even more "immediate" sign-up process - they allow you to skip it all together. Any guest can begin using their dashboard and begin customising settings, testing mock transactions and making customer profiles before entering any sign-up information. No username, password or email. It's only when you want to go live ...


12

I say it plays a few psychological tricks quite well. First, as noted, the feeling of exclusiveness: that not any average Joe will go there, it's not something common like (insert lots of contempt here) IKEA. Second: it creates curiosity. Just by not being able to see, you get curious about what you are missing. A few nicely placed teasers on the front ...


8

The only way that you are going to realistically test a headline is to A/B test it with your target audience. You could have focus groups (which is what book publishers usually do) but that isn't feasible for most web publishing due to the hight cost and turnaround time. Another solution would be to have an automated A/B test for different headlines. This ...


8

I'll start this answer with a quote from Richard Reed, co-founder of Innocent Smoothies (the fruit drinks): "90% of our marketing strategy goes into the bottle." Innocent is not a digital company though - the point is that they invest a lot into the product quality. Marketing is way more efficient (aka delivering better conversion rates) if the promise ...


7

This question is really easy: conversion improvement is based on UX, because it's based on testing, research, analysis, auditing and deployment based on all of these techniques (between others) in which Marketing is just one of those techniques. And I have a Marketing degree, so believe me I'm not putting down marketing, just considering everything on ...


5

Different websites have different purposes, and those differences often mean that what would be the death of one would also be a great idea for another. Barriers to entry aren't always a side effect of wanting people to do something (like sign up). Sometimes they are used as filters. In this case it could be that they are erecting barriers to try and ...


5

I think "Free" could improve conversion in some cases but there might be some cultural issues you should take into account. In a project I was involved we added the word Free to our signup button, that was the only change we did. After analyzing the impact we discovered quite positive results in our American and British sites but negative consequences in ...


5

This is pretty common (from experience) - and there are a few common reasons: couldn't identify the download link didn't realise they needed to click the link but expected some magic to provide the file browser/user failed to click the link user got distracted "Oooh - look, a youtube video of cats" user found an alternative in another tab and downloaded it ...


4

It all depends on what product you are trying to sell and what question will you be helping the user to answer. These could fundamentally affect how the pricing information is presented. For instance, "which flavor of your product should I be buying?" (lead by feature) is a totally different question from "What is the cheapest price I can buy your product ...


4

Is this an effective pattern to make a site/experience seem "exclusive"? Are there examples that have made barriers like this a part of a good experience for their (apparently exclusive) user base? I feel like this is more a question of effective marketing rather than a question of being a proper user experience pattern. I think the key is ...


4

Jetsetter, One Kings Lane, Fab, Gilt ... asking for registration before content is definitely a trend for the high status sites these days. I am not a marketer, but I am assuming a combination of the illusion of exclusivity plus the ability to capture user info up front is motivating this particular web fad at the moment, and I can't say I am a fan. That ...


4

I've drawn the diagram which could give you some insights. So your task is to design flow, that leads user to a decision point. Some acquired value and good experience before asking to Sign Up could create relation to a product or service and loss aversion effect. Still, if it isn't gained yet, user has a second chance. The moment of decision making can ...


4

Yes, there is evidence that in some situations, long landing pages (essentially what you described) have a significantly higher conversion rate. In short, removing other decision options gets a person to scroll down and actually see more of your site than they would have if they have to actively select each page that they want to see. This has consistently ...


4

The ecommerce company I work for uses modals (pop-ups) to show a quick view of products. Google Analytics doesn't detect this interaction (no trigger was set on it either) so I don't have any data of people who click on the quickview vs. people who navigate to the products detail page. After implementation the effect of it (on conversion rates or something ...


4

If the CEO is someone I can relate to, think is funny or important figure who make substantial contributions to help organizations, then yes. If the CEO is a family member or a friend, then yes, but she would probably not be friend or family member to the majority of others. If the CEO is funny, like Conan O'Brian or Will Ferrel. If the CEO acts like ...


4

Your goal is a good one. In the e-comm space, it's generally accepted that more page loads will result in less customers at the end of the funnel. The funnel is a cruel master. But there's a catch Your question hints at the fact that a shorter solution must also be a good one. You can't just cram a page full of info and declare "look, there's less pages ...


4

The $300 Million Button So you want a case of "so-and-so changed the button and sales went through the roof"? Well I think this is as close as you'll get, it comes with a snazzy title and all. The $300 Million Button Backstory It's hard to imagine a form that could be simpler: two fields, two buttons, and one link. Yet, it turns out this form was ...


4

Guess a lot I know that sounds kind of silly, but that's what it comes down to. You can analyze Sales figures Seasonal volume spikes Site analytics Customer service feedback Related case studies and so on But none of that will tell you the why behind the behavior you're seeing. So you're left with one option: make smart, experience-informed guesses. ...


3

In my opinion, I will break this down into 3 part. First form will require the person's personal info such as the name and contacts. After the user complete the form, then prompt the other 2. This will effectively reduce the cluttering on the screen. The choice of using a list over a drop down as it's easier to view all. You might want to add in Location ...


3

I think buttons are better as well because it gives the user a full understanding of what sizes are available and how the garment is sized just at a glance. For example, a dress can be sized with letters (XS, S, M...) or numbers (00, 0, 2, 4), and all sizes might not be offered (XS, 00). Even if your sizing is generally consistent, it's still helpful to ...


3

I recommend looking at this article which talks about a A\B test that was done on seeing the conversion rates while using a solid call to action vs a ghost button in emails. To quote the article Test A used our baseline newsletter template, which includes ghost buttons. Test B replaced these ghost CTAs with solid blue buttons. Everything else about ...


3

Generally, pick speed over image quality. But if you're willing to invest, you may be able to get both. The tradeoff here is image quality vs load time, and I don't think studies are going to help you particularly because the results really depend on how your site uses images. For example, if you are displaying products in a grid, users tend to be much ...


3

In a B2B environment (in which captive audiences are more common) one of the biggest hurdles is that the buyers are not the users. Purchasing is often done through committee, assessing the needs of the business and then considers the solutions from qualified vendors. Although user considerations are often part of the decision process, prioritization is more ...


2

This takes into account the marketing / UX cross over. I see UX crossing over into many functions that already exist within a business. This is the reason that many business feel that they are doing UX because the concepts that make up UX artefacts and deliverables have been produced by already established departments. Like already noted in the answers each ...


2

It's a struggle monetizing UX to begin with. I think finding a dollar-for-dollar comparison with Marketing is going to be tough. That said, I think you still need both. And, sadly, when you can't have both, often marketing is the better investment. I base that statement on the simple fact that there is a LOT of bad products out there with atrocious UX ...


2

"Marketing is to create a customer" (Peter Drucker) "UX is to create a happy customer" (Me)


2

It depends on your user base and if they know if a number is a toll free number or not. Toll free numbers are generally 1-800 numbers but there are cases in other countries where the toll free code might be different. Refer to the screenshot below taken from this site: With regards to your second question, If your user base is well aware that your number ...


2

There's an interesting chapter on behaviours associated with 'Free' in this book: "Dan Ariely: Predictably Irrational" Which does cite actual research. There's a wikipedia synopsis: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predictably_Irrational#The_Cost_of_Free In chapter 3, Ariely explains how humans react to the words "free" and "zero". Humans make decisions ...



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