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4

Great question! This is a very common design pattern and it's one that sites screw up all the time (IMO!). Usually the objective is: Ensure the user sees the notification. Allow the user to get on with using the site smoothly after that. Don't p*ss off your users. This seems simple, but implementations often break the objectives! For example: Model ...


1

Redesign the connector The obvious, answer if you had the option would be to design the plug so that either: the orientation doesn't matter it's clear which orientation must be used Modify the housing If this isn't an option, the next best thing would be to make a modified cover which forces a given alignment. This is could be done by selecting an ...


0

In the myriad of applications in use today, the floppy is iconic and means one thing. In a way its like latin in that it cannot be misunderstood, the association merely needs to be learned, like most other icons do anyway. For those of us that use powerful and complex tools like photoshop or visual studio, think of all of the different icons. Of these ...


1

Some general computer-literate folks would assume * and ? and database-literate folks would assume % and _ and the general public would assume the computer is smart enough to read your mind and that you don't need a trailing wildcard to match. So, here is where on-screen help text (always visible) is needed. Last Name _________ (Use % to match zero or ...


3

As for why SQL changed? This is just my guess select * from table The * means all columns and they did not want to use * for two things Second I think you would search for a literal * more often than % Let's say you pick % for the wildcard If they enter a * then display a warning message Reminder in productname % is the wildcard - not * or ...


1

No one mentioned localization so far. UI Design guidelines recommend leaving enough space for longer wordings potentially coming with other languages. Vertical radio buttons have as much space as width of the section. But with 3 horizontal buttons you are limiting yourself to less than 1/3 of the width (3 radio buttons and 3 labels in one row) and it might ...


4

Are your users more familiar with SQL syntax or search engine syntax? If there's a strong leaning one way or the other, there's your answer.


4

What is your interface? Are users entering SQL SELECT statements directly? If so, you should use % and _ because they're part of the SQL standard, and the user is expecting standard SQL. Are users entering search terms into an application, which is incidentally using an SQL database as its search backend? In this case, use * and ? as your wildcards, ...


-1

Briefly, your question is "why did SQL-92 changed the wildcards?", correct? I couldn't find it on the internet. My guess is that they aimed not to mix with the * character used after the keyword "select". Then, you listed reasons to use * and ?, and there is no reason to use % and _.


1

The horizontal layout is much less readable. In my opition, this case is the only exception: (x) yes ( ) no (not to mention lay outs used in A/B tests, where two images are displayed horizontally with a radio button underneath each one) Even if the labels are "left/center/right", I don't see components being used that way. If we want to mimic something, ...



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