New answers tagged

1

Your second option is the best. Follow what WooCommerce do, they have one of the largest sets of options of any plugin, and they group them logically, not caring if one tab just has one option: Tab contents for usability need to be grouped logically. The label at the top needs to be able to succinctly describe what will be laid out in that tab. From ...


2

Here is an option i think will be great (experimental): Divide all the controls in two groups, common and rare use. Show only the common controls on one page, and add at the bottom an input field that will will ask the user if he needs something else. The user will enter a search query in a natural language: "I want to change the permissions for guest ...


0

I think this needs work on making it more obvious on what you should do, but I think this is probably about as efficient as you'll get in terms of clicks. It also should be quicker for the shop keeper to make updates. It's based on how I envisage a shop keeper might write down his time table: M,T,W,F: 8:30 - 18 T: 8 - 12, 13 - 20 S: 10 - 16 S: Closed ...


1

Here is my solution to collect working times:


4

How about something where admins can click/drag the hours for each day. You could provide extra feedback of the actual hours selected during this action.


-1

Most important factor is how fast one can go loud or quiet.


4

When it comes to volume control, a nicely weighted, big physical control (knob or slider) is the gold standard. It provides fast and precise granular control with tactile feedback. The rest are use-case and packaging driven compromises. Rocker switch (or two separate buttons/keys) Compact packaging circuit can be water/dust proof tactile feedback It ...


8

Instead of asking "why shouldn't I?", ask "why should I?". Currently the de-facto standard is to put the timeline at the bottom. Changing this will cause mental friction, so you've got to have a good reason not to follow standards. If you have a good enough reason, then yes, maybe, maybe, move it up. But consider alternative solutions first. Why do you ...


4

If you like graphical solutions you may try something like this: Clicking in the stripe below the edit field helps to select the hours without typing them. User may also click and drag, if they like.


36

I just don't see much benefit, while the downside is significant. As for the benefits you mention: The point about obscuring subtitles seems quite minor to me. Typically when using the navigation, the user is necessarily distracted from the video content, anyway. Update: some people have pushed back about obscuring content. However, if the user needs to ...


16

The top of panels is usually reserved for controls over the panel itself, not the content of the panel. For instance, in your example you have the Full Screen icon in the top-right, which at a glance is strikingly similar to the close 'X' icon that would dismiss the panel altogether. Also, out of context it's hard to tell whether it'd work. As a single ...


3

Combine 1+2 with a little bit of seasoning. Option 2 is great because the selected range is thicker and a bit darker. But the black handles don't provide any affordance. So I would replace them with circular handles from Option 1, but why not throw in a bit of drop shadow for that extra-affordance?


0

Without knowing much of the context or output, I'd say four initial things: remember the affordance in context (is it to be manipulated by mouse or finger, or both, and which of these better indicate that/both of those interactions?) similarly, remember the affordance must be 'visible' in the context of use (straight up, regardless of device, 4 and 1 throw ...


1

The main reason is to simplify the UI so it's easier to navigate. The excuse ("reason") this works is because the hardware almost always supports hardware volume adjustment, whether it's your iPhone or a 5.1 speaker system. Is that a good reason to remove it? No. However, even Apple has struggled with the right way to handle having both a volume adjustment ...


0

For me as a left handed gamer, though from a PC side, I use the mouse in my left hand and thus have to use my right hand for directions (wasd, or in my case the numpad 8,4,5,6) so If you a right handed gamer you would use your left hand for directions to keep your good hand on the mouse. I had always assumed that was why, completely forgetting that there ...


1

I would choose the 2 buttons approach, for these reasons. 1) The "Book" label gives the impression that you are booking a private ride service, more often associated with a personal car ride. It will be slightly inappropriate to say that you are booking a bus service assuming you will be sharing the bus ride other commuters. 2) As one of your team member ...


1

How about having two separate tabs, one for booking a car, another for buying a bus ticket. Both tabs would be laid out as similarly as possible. The button at the end would then say "BOOK CAR" or "BUY TICKET" as appropriate. That way, the user knows which option they have chosen, but the UI is the same. Consider what Google Maps does when you ask for ...


2

My answer could be a litle of topic, but I want to share my thougts to this anyway. The first question is, what does the user want. Does she want to book a car od buy a bus ticket or does she want to get from location A to location B an choose the better service. To choose the better service she would have to know the time it takes an the costs for each ...


2

There cannot be a clear cut answer until one can see the entire flow of the application , where is the user coming from where does the user go etc from the mentioned screen. One Button Pros - No confusion , user knows what to do. Where to tap to go forward. Cons - Another screen , trust me more and more screens can frustrate the user. Popup screen to ...


1

Considering your flow, I think a single button is the way to go. What happens afterwards is the key. You should be displaying the available options for both scenarios instantly. The sorting of the options can be adjusted based on the more common use cases. Moreover, as a next step, you could create flows and UIs to suggest bus riders to try the car ...


1

You could use something like a Chosen Jquery Plug in which integrates the two controls you showed in your post , an auto complete, a drop down all into one. Its very compact, user friendly, intuitive. https://harvesthq.github.io/chosen/#optgroup-support There is also a grouping version in the link above.


0

Thanks for all the comments in the end we went for a smaller alteration of the traditional. Mouse overs can give click hints on the left menu. Click once on one item to add it to the right hand, selected, list Click on the X to remove from selection and return to the left hand, available, list. So similar approach just less clicks.


1

I think that your new approach is fine if you just make one change - ensure that the dropdown doesn't overlay the tags/options already selected. Other considerations / potential enhancements you could make (pending on the context): If your grouped dataset becomes quite large with options to choose, switch the dropdown list to a combo box. An example of ...


1

I would be more in favour of the traditional approach, at least when comparing it to your current design idea. As BrunoH mentioned, the chosen items are hidden once the dropdown is enabled. Users have a short attention span, meaning that they will probably forget the items they've chosen once they'll click the dropdown to choose another one. This would ...



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