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1

There's no chevron, but the behavior you are describing exist in Snapseed (photo editor for Android) If you drag up/down, you will see the parameters you can affect. If you are dragging left/right, you can change the value of the previously selected parameter


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You should realize that there might be very specific reasons why those arrows are placed where they are on the screen, and those reasons might not fit with your purpose. The other thing is that without a sensible scale or idea of the number of items and the exact frequency and context of usage, it will be hard to determine what the optimal option might be ...


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Well, I'd go with your 3rd option, only that on the right. Since most people is right handed, that will prevent your users have to go across your element every time they want to interact with it. And having your buttons close together requires minimum effort to scroll up and down. I did a very quick sample to visually explain the concept and how you reduce ...


2

Clearly hiding them is better than always overlaying them, so the question is then on the downsides of having them instead below the video. The first disadvantage with them being below the video is that it's distracting. Unlike the other elements around the video, the controls move. Not only that, but they're close to the video itself, and high in ...


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One reason would be to allow video content on the bottom of the screen to remain visible. My first thought would be not to obscure any subtitles. Secondly, they need the real estate to show their own ads and content on the bottom of the screen :-). Perhaps there are also technical considerations which have to do with embedding video. After all, VLC is ...


3

I can still remember when YouTube videos had transport controls visible all the time. As YouTube videos are usually embedded in other webpages the transport controls need to be included within the embedded object. However, this takes up room on the page. In order to minimize the area on the page, the controls are tucked into the playback area and hidden ...


1

The playback controls on YouTube are overlayed on top of the video. If the controls would not disappear, the bottom part of the video would stay obscured. Other software, such as VLC, place their controls outside of the video area, and as such do not need to be hidden.


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I don't think there is any best practice. I find more natural a vertical slider to zoom, with down direction for zooming-in and up direction for zooming out. It seems to me more natural probably because in google maps the user scrolls-down to zoom in (and so many other maps websites) and the same gesture is used to scroll-down in documents and websites. So ...


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Grouping Grouping the features would go a long way. If there are meaningful groups of features, use those. Focus on one group at a time, with the other groups visible but out of focus. This can be done with tabs or collapsible sections, for instance. Defaults and Exceptions You didn't ask about this, but you could provide a way to set the options for all ...


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I think it would be totally fine with the Edit button contextually relevant to the content or segment. You can try to disable or hide the Edit button when users switch to other segments. But it's true that the location of the button makes it a bit like for the whole page. The alternative approach would be that having the Edit button in the header of the ...


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The existing approach you have taken is perfectly fine and doesn't go against iOS guidelines. Try and see if you can place the edit action in footer of the page. Even iOS follows the same convention - check their Clock app and see the Alarm & World Clock tabs. Edit: If you see, the Edit option is same for the World Clock and Alarm Tab



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