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6

I have always heard them called "splash screens" (especially on mobile). I think the traditional splash screen doesn't include the down arrow but this site includes many examples that include them. http://line25.com/articles/web-design-trend-showcase-splash-screen-revival Modern examples of splash screens are built right into the main page, filling the ...


13

There's no official pattern name for it but the NN/g termed it as "False Floors". They've written an article on it and have discussed how this practice leads to bad UX as it does not naturally encourage the users to scroll. Good designs shouldn't need an arrow to tell users to scroll. To quote from the article: When pages of any size offer little content ...


3

Interesting question. It depends on the maturity of your users. The scrollbar is good option to give your users a hint about the amount of content that is remaining to be viewed. By the size of the scroller handle. Showing it persistently need not be the case. As the user is interested in the content. This can appear when the user is swiping from left to ...


0

Having both the scrollbar and swiping the images might cause confusion as the swipe directions will be different. Dragging the scrollbar to Left to Right to reveal the images to the right Swipe the images Right to Left to reveal the images to the right. I would say that the partially hidden image to the right is enough of a hint to users. Scrollbars ...


1

I think the faded item will clearly say "there's more stuff over here", and the way you get to items partially off the screen is, by standard, the swipe. The scrollbar would be useful to show how many items are off-screen (one screenful? a dozen?) and where you are in the horizontal list, but that's clearly a secondary need.


1

If I was a user and had that layout in front of me, I would try to swipe using the images first, and if that failed I would try to use the scroll bar to scroll along. I do, however, consider myself an advanced user of technology. Having both options will let more advanced users or those who use touch devices primarily use the swipe action, and the scroll ...


0

In the physical world, one term that could applicable is potentiometer. It's typically a knob or slider and the further you turn it, the the higher or lower the resistance within. Note that these are difficult to implement in a virtual UI. Knobs and sliders are great physical objects to interact with*. They can be a real pain to interact with via a ...


1

The basic functionality sounds to me like what would be in the physical world called a jog dial. There are two basic types of wheels. One type has no stops and can be spun the entire way around, because it is a relative rotary encoder. This type depends on tracking the actual motion of the dial: the faster it spins forward or back, the faster it ...


0

You can also try other keys than the "traditional" Arrow/WASD, like: QWAS 1245 (Numpad)


1

For completeness`s sake, here is one possible solution to communicate the controls to the user I played around with. By showing the user the control keys directly in the level, I try to minimize the confusion, as the user is reminded of the control scheme at all times. It is noteworthy that this seems not to work as well with the arrow-keys, as an ...


2

Using the up arrow for either northeast or northwest seems fine to me. Which? It doesn't matter As others have mentioned, the feedback loop is so fast that the user will figure it out quickly. But: Up arrow = northeast This seems the most intuitive, because (English speakers at least) associate forwards with right. And if you're still worried: Make the ...


1

If your space is limited you could try a solution that I've used for a recent project with similar requirements, using this plugin for multi select . Everything related to the plugin is editable (filtering, columns number, etc). It allows users to: Filter Select all Select all from a region (the ones in bold) When you filter, as any filter, only the ...


0

I think the Pacman example shows the answer. The confusion is in the way the figure is standing. If you set the figure in a three-quarter view, and give the figure a (three-quarter) face, it then becomes obvious which way is forward, left, right, etc.


1

Your best bet here is accordions, cases like yours are exactly the reason why they were created. I did a super quick mockup (so obviosuly there are more countries in Africa, just assume I listed them all) in which you can see the logic: 1. Display accordion // 1.2 Display ALL or Customize // 1.3 if ALL=true ('add all countries in this panel') ...



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