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0

I’ve never seen a solution like this. Facebook Paper allows for chat bubbles to be tossed around the window (if I remember correctly), but I haven’t seen any exploration in roughing productivity, which is what I would call this type of feature. I’m not sure there is a valid use-case for this as the organized person has a pretty specific idea where they want ...


1

Indeterminate checkboxes are not a good idea ...but if you must use them, the two common styles are shaded (windows approach) or dashed (mac approach): A key issue with the mixed/indeterminate state is that once the user makes a selection (checked or unchecked), you have to either: Provide a way for them to get back to the indeterminate state (e.g. ...


1

The most common way to represent a multiple state selection with a checkbox is to give it a dash. In the example below: all students have "Lorem" selected, some students have "Ipsum" and some don't, nobody has "Dolar". download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups In the case of radio buttons your best bet is to just leave ...


1

What you need is not abstract percentages which seem needlessly specific anyway, but statuses that shed a positive light onto the current situation. These should be visualizable in a symbol/icon and phrasable in few English words. The following examples are just a shot from the hip, since I’m not really a pub guy: 0% – relaxing atmosphere 20% – instant ...


0

In Britain, at least, there are architectural/plumbing issues in the past that we had to deal with. This guy explains it better than I could: https://youtu.be/HfHgUu_8KgA


2

A key strength of Material design is that it is defined from abstract principles downwards. While specification does include definition of components, it is (a) not prescriptive, and most importantly (b) there is enough mid-level and high-level guidance that a designer can create a new component that fits in with the other Material design components. ...


1

Provided the control can be styled and made to behave within the guidelines of material style and consistent behaviour, I'd say use it. I get the impression that the Material Design guidelines are largely concerned with how an app appears and behaves, and doesn't necessarily prescribe a narrow list of controls you can choose from. In cases where you want ...


0

Another reason to place the switch outside the bathroom is that it can act as an indicator that someone is in the room.


1

Here in Norway the switch is usually inside the room, just next to the door. Except maybe in a bathroom where it's usually on the outside (a toilet without shower, will probably have the lights on the inside). We don't really notice much where the switch are though, since we usually leave the most lights on all the time. That's probably because in the ...


0

Why? Because of all sorts of reasons outside of UX. But I'd ask the reverse...why would you have both a temperature and quantity option? When showering, there usually isn't a gradient of amount. It's either on or off. No real need for a spectrum there. As for temp, temp is created by adjusting the individual amount of cold and hot. In otherwords, the ...


10

They don't any more. They used to because it is the most mechanically simple implementation of temperature control. However, this is only historical. None of the other answers mention the legalities of this. The International Building Code (what most US local codes are modeled on these days) mandates that all new shower controls must be temperature ...


-1

It is funny that there are so many answers to this question without getting one that has to do with the actual function of a shower valve. Let's go over the 3 examples that we have as examples already: 1. This shower system has electronic mechanisms to calibrate the temperature and flow. The pros include easy user interface, looks cool (maybe because ...


1

In Australia, most showers have separate hot and cold knobs, and the more modern remainder are 'mixing batteries' like what tillinberlin describes. There are some big UX problems with hot/cold taps: When turning on the shower it takes time to adjust the taps to get the right temperature and pressure. People must be taught to turn on the cold tap first and ...


3

I found it very amusing reading all these answers which I assume were written by people in the US. I live in the UK and visit France and Spain very regularly. I believe a resident of any of these countries would be appalled to find a hot/cold shower in a hotel room in Europe - I have not seen such a thing for many years. All the talk about the the ...


0

This question assumes that “temperature” and “quantity” knobs are easier to use. And yes, those types of controls are easier to use for me at least, but for my elderly mother, those types of controls have never been easy to use. My mother could never tell which knob was for pressure and which knob was for the temperature. Part of the problem I think is ...


2

Some systems in South America (called "calefón" in my country) require certain level of pressure to get the hot water running (for example, you can turn the knob 30º without the "calefon" getting activated in order change the water temperature), so in that case it's a device limitation.


17

I can honestly say I have never seen a shower that has separate hot/cold knobs like you describe, and I've lived everywhere up and down both the east and west US coast. Every shower I've ever seen has two concentric wheels. The inner one controls temperature while the outer one controls pressure. Here's what they look like (although the labels around the ...


97

You are totally right As with many other devices (eg the QWERTY keyboard) the hot/cold tap persists not because it's the most usable design, but because of: Cost since proper temperature control requires an electromechanical feedback loop design, or calibrated thermostatic valves which needs to be periodically adjusted or replaced. This drives up the cost ...


28

I suppose it's mostly a question of how much money you want to invest into your fittings. In most cases you'll have one pipe for hot and one for cold water. The knobs then just open and close those pipes – I can hardly think of any easier / cheaper solution. However there are actually different solutions that do exactly what you describe: Visiting Canada ...


11

Hot and cold knobs work great, and everyone intuitively understands that turning the knob makes more water come out, ie more water pressure. The practical reason is it gives maximum control with the fewest parts. Also, the range for usable water pressure is not very large, and dedicating an entire knob to it seems to be a waste. Your solution would require ...


0

I agree that in general hiding the link is preferred. But in this case I'd make an argument for keeping the links but greying them out. You have a bunch of possible links on any post and a bunch of different states with different options available. If you hide the links, as you have in your screenshots, the layout of each set of links is very different for ...


0

You're right to consider removing the unactionable links (as lzhaki has said) this will only confuse users. I also agree that it's a little more complicated when an action can activate the links. In that instance my suggestion would be to keep the links visible but greyed out, this at least suggests that there may be an available action that can activate ...


2

There isn't much point cluttering the interface (visual noise) with actions that cannot be performed. It violates quite a few UX heuristic. Obviously when an action can be unlocked via user action, orientation comes to mind (although it may still be worth hiding the locked actions so their introduction to the interface will draw attention). Aspects such as ...



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