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I had a problem like this recently. The answer I came up with was this: Elements/controls must be contrast compliant when disabled as this provides vital clues to the user telling them that their task is incomplete or that certain options are selected/deselected. - In short: Yes, they need to be contrast compliant. EDIT - The following is incorrect however ...


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No, it would seem not, as W3C states 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: (Level AA) Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1; Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an ...


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People in Autistic spectrum often have issues with parsing high-contrasted visuals. This was researched as a Scotopic sensitivity syndrome: http://www.autism.com/understanding_irlens On the contrast and readability correlation in common population: http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/4-tips-and-tricks-for-more-legible-content/ According to the Web Content ...


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You can just provide an optimal contrast on the default layout of your interface. Also because a visual impaired user could have some difficulties in scan and find the high contrast icon. So you don't need a high contrast version. You should simply test the colours of text against the background (you can find many useful color pickers tools). Bear in mind ...


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My son, who is almost 5, has no visual problems but does have autism. He insists on having high-contrast mode for all his web activities and YouTube viewing. I didn't know it existed on the computer, but he found it, and every time I turn it off for my own use, he immediately turns it back on.



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