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4

In Windows menus can have either commands (Print) or options (View => Large Icons). This is what Windows Design Guidelines for menus says about using bullets and checkmarks: Menu items that are options may use bullets and checkmarks. Commands may not. And on using icons: Consider providing menu item icons for: The most commonly used menu ...


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On standard Windows, icons and checkboxes share in the same column. Thant means you cannot have both a checkmark and an icon at the same time. The following image is from a Delphi 32bit EXE, wrapping the standard Windows API - images seem to take precedence to checkmarks: I have seen (rarely) programs with two such columns, showing checkmarks to the left ...


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This is determined by whether the action is bulk (will be performed on more than 1 item) or individual (will be performed on each item at a time). As you can see, compress will act on all selected items, whilst duplicate will act on each item separately. So the copy of bulk actions changes based on the selection, where that of individual items doesn't. ...


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UX is not about rules, it's about solving unique problems within unique context. Problems in UX differ greatly as there are always many variables involved, so each problem is looked within its particular context. There really isn't a "best place" to put navigation - it depends.


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This menu system has been around for a while Mobile and tablet game developers like Gameloft have used the interaction for years before the article (or the source demo it references) were written. In tablet games, they are used for cases like casting spells in an action game. It's useful to study why they're effective in those interfaces: The user hits ...


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Since you mentioned your audience is mainly elderly folk I don't think using hamburger menus are a good idea, since they popped up quite recently. I'd go with something that feels more like traditional web navigation, but geared to mobile resolution.


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I don't think it is particularly important to make millions of content items directly available via navigation. If you look at other sites with similar amounts of content, they hardly ever work this way. Instead, the way one accesses content is: Search. This is a much more efficient, friendly way to find what you want in a huge sea of content. A ...


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I'd also take a look in mobile guidelines (aka Android & iOS Human interface guidelines). Since "long press" contextual gesture does exactly what you describe - context menu opens, but no action is hit - this as well might be the "cause" for the change. It also applies to hyperlink usage on mobile devices: Long press -> Copy URL, but link is not ...


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Google's guidelines explicitly mention something about the order of the items in a menu: Menus with static content should have the most frequently used menu items placed at the top of the menu. Menus with dynamic content may have other behavior, such as placing previously used fonts at the top of the menu. The order can change based on user ...


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Having a context menu is nice for a shortcut, but in this instance may be causing more frustration than help. Can you change the location of where the action is performed to something like 1) select the object and 2) find the action on an action bar. Something like this: This buys you some time because the user has to move their attention and cursor from ...


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I believe you're on the right track. You've mentioned that you're avoiding the use of right-clicking because you're hesitant to override default browser behavior which aligns with a users' expectation. Expectation of your users' will have to be addressed by your team; however, I would argue that most users expect browser controls to come up with the right ...



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