New answers tagged

1

I, too, used to think that teams and employee culture is not really required on a product website as my primary user doesn't care about who made this. But, then, our analytics show that people have been clicking on team and jobs pages, which tells us that we also have an audience that is looking out to working with us. To serve that audience with the ...


2

I can't comment yet, but just wanted to mention that about thee gas ago we ran an internal review of our organisations various communication channels. One of the surprising results was that the great majority of staff in non-executive positions wanted us to include photographs of all executives and higher level staff in all our organisational charts. When ...


2

I think that the majority of these sites are usually owned by venture capitalists and entrepreneurs looking to sell the site/company/app or raise capital from investors. In my career of web development the only companies that ask me to put the founders and the management on a page are those who are start-up corporations backed by investors looking to raise ...


0

I always tell people that, if you are asking the question about a piece of content, then it is one, some, or all of the things you mention and does not belong.


0

If you do not simply want to tell them "no", you could suggest to make the company BS part longer. Let them add some key milestones of the company. Then, after you have a nice long writeup, it will "obviously be too long to fit on the product page". You make a separate page for it and put a nice little unobtrusive link on your product page. Aside from that, ...


2

Just my 2€: Number of subscribers I could not care less, either way. I understand that some companies removed this metric because when your numbers are getting smaller it is a bad sign. Anything claiming the best in the industry That claim is just stupid (or, to put it more friendly, it is pure marketing), as it's not objectively possible to pick out a ...


5

Our company has such an "About Us" page in that shows all the employees' names with their photos. When I first started it was a great cheat sheet to help me remember the names of some 60 people. If all you want is a functioning piece of software, why are you going to the "About Us" page? By your reasoning there should be no job openings on any company web ...


3

It's not for you. It's for the employees! A little recognition for them. It shows that the company is proud to declare that these are the individuals fulfilling these roles. Like the credits after a movie — you may not sit and watch them, but they're always going to be there.


3

TLDR: Users feel an enhanced sense of trust in a company, after seeing the "people behind the words." (Provided that these people look trustworthy, which with a professional photograph is relatively easy to consistently "create") An About Us page is very useful to journalists / the press in general, and key figure photographs could be featured in an ...


15

On our clients CPA Accounting website, "Meet The Firm" is the 2nd most visited page on the site, right after the home page. They use it as a recruiting tool. Are these the type of people I want to: Work for as an employee Can I trust these guys with my sensitive tax data


58

Different audiences want different things. You're assuming these pages are for average customers: Why would users even care about the people working there? I just want a working piece of software and thats good...right? ...but those aren't the only people viewing a company's website. A well-run website design process begins with an audit of all a ...


12

It can create confidence in your company, by showing that it has humans running it behind the scenes. I find faceless websites in some ways untrustworthy, as you can never tell if its just a one man band behind the scene. I guess someone could fake the about page but usually the biographies on about pages link to LinkedIn or Twitter to show a real human is ...


33

Because people do business with people, not with faceless algorithms and the marketing presentation of any given product needs to reflect that. If your product faced a robot, it would just be raw code (like mark-up for an search engine spider) but your product doesn't - it faces a human being who needs to be satisfied on a human level; faces and the ...


91

Another reason kind of related to some of the aforementioned ones probably has something to do with establishing Character. These pages, when done well, can communicate a good deal about the culture and people who work at the company. Are the C-level folks blazer-wearing middle-aged men? Or are they 20- and 30-somethings with tattoos and goofy photos? As ...


68

I think the comment "ego, empathy, content?" by @midas deserves some elaboration, because it is actually a pretty good answer to the question: Ego: it is our company, and putting my face to it shows people that I am the top dog and the boss of all these people. Empathy: this is who we are (not just a piece of software), get to know us and you'll believe ...


2

On line length, I'd think the jury is still out. There are studies that conclude longer lines are easier and faster to read, but if you ask people they'll say they prefer narrower columns (probably influenced by our experience with book paragraphs being as wide as the book itself). On paragraph length and readability by a Google Cognitive Scientist: Google ...


0

I also like the Netflix approach. They also show "Titles related to X" where X is something the viewer has watched previously. What makes this work well for Netflix though is how their algorithms select the content being suggested. The algorithm uses a combination of the user's viewing history and any ratings they've given to the content they've watched. ...


0

Netflix does with well with specifics in the title, like: Because you watched Breaking Bad This feels really catered to the user and draws attention - the recommendations for which feel implicitly justified. It's also likely concise. Regardless of what you choose, it may be the case that your boss wants to see how you think and approach a problem more ...



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