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Having too many pages can be a bad experience for the user too. Typically the "Contact Us" page link would be located in the footer anyway, so if anything you are cutting out an unnecessary stage.


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I think the best solution to this problem is to have both. Create a contact us page. This page will be rich in detail and can include things such as: a list of relevant contacts at the company, including names, emails, phone numbers etc. location map(s) a contact form company social media a set of FAQs for common contact us issues links to other relevant ...


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As long as the footer does not need a long scroll to show up, I think this design is good. If all you had in that 'contact us' page was just this small to fit in a footer, this new design would also be getting rid of unnecessary white space and an additional click.


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Without meaning to be facetious, printed books have spent centuries refining solutions to this problem, on several different levels. If you want to make it easy for someone to consume a large body of text through a rectangular viewport, look at the page of a comparable printed book and imagine it's a browser window. Websites tend to strongly emulate ...


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There is several tricks. Split information to paragraphs with different level headers. Like you can see at wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_(grammar) Hide information and show the wide button [show more]. Don't forget about formatting. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Hide some paragraphs under ...


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Depends on the purpose of your site. You have some techniques to improve your page with a lot of text. You could use some approaches like @Pierre's and Aleksandr Blekh answer. But if you can't hide your text for any reason, you have other options: Choose a clean and simple font: To makes the text more attractive and easy to read. Combine big titles with ...


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Adding to some approaches mentioned in @Pierre's answer. You could use some visual elements that hide portions of the information (text, in your case) and display the hidden portions instantly on demand (usually, following user's action, such mouse click). Such visual elements include, but are not limited to, tabs, expanding text panels and widgets (I'm sure ...


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It actually all depends on the purpose of your site and of course of its users. If you take the example of a newspaper website, no one will argue that displaying a lot of text is bad practice. Such sites, however, have taken design steps to continually improve the experience for their users. One interesting idea is to take advantage of the "reader" feature ...


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This seems to work well with the concept of shape reading, http://www.microsoft.com/typography/ctfonts/WordRecognition.aspx ,and word recognition. However, in theory I can only see this useful for horizontal (left to right) fades and not as well with Amazon's vertical fade.http://softwareas.com/pure-css-solution-to-avoid-cutting-off-text/ We could equate ...



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