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1

It depends on your website/content/overall organization of the layout. Some companies put the philosophy as a tag-line somewhere haphazardly on their website or on the footer. Since the philosophy is so important for you and your business, why not go ahead and put it front and center? Well, not literally. The design is up to you. But, if you want this ...


0

You can place that in the landing page, something like this: landing page structure: Header section Overview section ( sort of slider etc ) Purpose section Insert another section if needed Footer section There are no right or wrong answer to this, it depends on who your audience is. What kind of websites do you build.


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You just put the link of company profile on footer of the landing page and it opens to other page, It's common for many website to put there so that It's not annoying its core content.


5

There are pros and cons to both. I would suggest showing something on both landing page as well as in the footer/near the footer. By balancing out the contents presented in these two locations, a good level of outreach can be achieved. See my reasoning below. On landing page Obviously the first thing your visitors see. If one of your business goals is to ...


0

You have two designs - well done (too many designers only create 1 design). Now test both of them with some people and see which one they prefer. Even better, ask your developers to create both designs and when this is deployed to production, send half your customers to one design and the other half to the other for a month or two and then see which design ...


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I remember seeing a dribbble where someone had redesigned a medium.com page. One of the things they had done was a small TOC anchored to the left, I really liked the idea. But the only way you will ever know is to try it, put a quick wireframe together and if it still makes sense then go from there. I actually love the idea of a TOC on smaller screens that ...


3

This is very much an "it depends" kind of question; as posed there's no single "correct" answer. Is the lengthy article something that users are likely to read continuously, from beginning to end? If so, intra-article navigation may not be necessary at all, and if included should be backgrounded rather than made persistently available so it doesn't ...


0

Your question highlights the problem of the long scroll. First of all, it's a myth that people don't scroll. Everybody Scrolls. There are so many articles present supporting this fact like this one and this one. But the real problem is with the text-based articles where you are least communicating with the user or the user is looking for a particular ...



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