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17

Firstly, from your description, it sounds as though when your users click the button, they are not saving, they are publishing (which has the side effect of saving) - so the button should be labelled 'publish'. Secondly, you are merging two decisions into one, when they should be kept separate - mainly for clarity, but also because more choices require more ...


8

This answer is inspired by Paul S above. Here is WordPress's save / preview / publish widget Most CMSs and blogs have something similar.


7

If content is engaging, people will read it. That should be enough. You can fine tune your content's copy as much as you want, but you'll need to communicate something, and depending on what you want to communicate, lengths of content blocks will vary. Think about this: an e-commerce site will probably have short blocks of content, because they'll want you ...


7

tl;dr 3 positive options, 1 neutral and 1 negative, and that makes 5 in total to strike a balance. The choice of labels and emoji/smiley should target the least negative emotion and the least positive emotion; because you have to cross the minimum threshold to be in the extreme/maximum. If you are fishing for data then this is the best option. Also emotions ...


7

Answer At 200ms you're close to Google's Ideal Server Load Time You should reduce your server response time under 200ms There are small things you can do to decrease the perceived load time: Full Page Loads Work in transitions so the loading bar spends less time on the load screen Provide a loader that users can "play with" Remove the loading ...


5

There is a concept called perceived performance and it is important just as much as the actual performance. Spinners and loading bars actually call attention to the wait and make your pages look like they are loading slower. Consider removing them If you are waiting for data to load you can try animating the content’s container so that it shrinks and then ...


4

I personally prefer non-obtrusive solutions like showing an edge of the next section of the content. Here it's shown with cards: it's obvious there is something on the right, and users flick almost unconsciously. No cognitive load whatsoever.


3

As a general rule of typography using all caps reduces readability for long segments of text. It should never be used for paragraphs especially, and only for short headlines. You can certainly use all caps in buttons, though, because buttons by nature contain short segments of text. In fact, all caps is the convention for buttons in Google's Material ...


3

With this little hack to google analytics, you should be able to track scroll depth to see just how far down the page visitors were scrolling. this will help to break down the content of the page in to segments. Also, Golden Ratio Typography Calculator will help you to get an idea about the font size to line-height ratio depending on the content width.


3

I'd add annoyed and bored. Happiness sounds like a consequence of being excited or amused and indifferent could just be no vote but if you want to keep it neutral you can use something like: Excited - Amused - Indifferent - Bored - Annoyed


3

Bias toward positive emotions 3 of the 5 are positive emotions: Happy, Excited, Amused 1 of 5 is nuetral emotions: Indifferent 1 of 5 is negative emotions: Angry You're setting up your ratings for a positive bias from the get go. Terminology Not everyone that doesn't like the content of an article is angry. What if the content is just poorly written, ...


2

Yes, if you are actually going to read the feedback If you are prepared to read the feedback, it's always good to allow users to submit optional feedback. A common layout for this is: This requires users to select a category, but allows them to also write comments optionally. Note that if you do this, you should actually try to read the comments, ...


2

I would suggest that having a "Free area" or a separate section of the site where everything on offer is free might attract users to that part of the site but probably won't generate a lot of traffic to areas where items must be paid for. An alternative solution might be to mix free items with paid items in whatever other cataloguing system you have but ...


2

As you mentioned, both ways are valid and could work as long as each one is user-friendly. So, there is no right or wrong, but you want to know what works best. I guess that the answer can't be 'the first' or 'the second' so you have to test it. I would do a usability test in both versions to see which of the two versions is more usable. However, I don't ...


2

In general, these words are used to make a connection with the user; to engage the user a little bit more (try these sentences without me or your and you'll feel the distance). With that in mind, you could see the whole interaction as a dialogue with someone else, in which you, really, are the boss. In general, the first person is used to tell the ...


2

For transactional emails, it's better to give the information front and center so that the user can easily get the information he's looking for. So, it will work for little content with a direct CTA. However,if you even have a paragraph of content, don't center align it. It has readability issues. This particular guide to transactional emails can help you ...


2

You want to know whether tabs are a good idea. It's good that you're asking, because they are not. In the Windows UX guidelines, Microsoft asks a series of questions to help developers and designers determine when a tab is the right control. Here's an excerpt: If used for settings, are settings on different pages completely independent? Will changing a ...


2

scrolling the next relevant story I don't know your goal but keeping the user at the site is important if it is content driven site. I think that the page can bring automatically the next relevant story. The relevancy rate can be calculated with the time that user is still staying. For enhancing your algorithm, you will need options and having 3-5 options ...


2

A tough question Benny. I read an article a few years ago that talked about online papers versus hardcopy papers. It didn't answer your question unfortunately however it did make this interesting quote: The paper cites other researchers on the subject who have theorized that the layout of online pages—which often insert ads mid-story or force readers to ...


2

I don't see why not to use capital letters for buttons and actions. It can be quite nice and add visual discernment to your app. It would be wise to watch for device visual standards (e.g. Android Material and iOS have different visual standards). You should also take care to make enough of white space around text to make it more clear and readable. This ...


2

There is nothing to stop you using capital letters (all-caps) to indicate actions. It should be noted, however, that there is no common pattern for all-caps indicating actions. If you are using the pattern across your system then you will be encouraging your users to understand that, wherever they see all-caps within your system, there is an action ...


2

A quick google turns up this article: 14 Beautiful Content-Heavy Websites for Inspiration It offers several principles, reworded here: White space – allow the content (and your visitors’ eyes) room to breathe Boxes, borders & graphical planes – Segment the information into visual categories Intuitive search method – Let your users jump straight to ...


2

You should make functionality visible to the users. Also, these are shortcut commands that combine two actions in one click. If users have to make two clicks to access them, the benefit is lost. Move the "Save & Back to List" and "Save & New" at the tool pallet. If space is an issue then use icons and mouse over tooltip. Also consider removing the ...


1

Cut off some content at the bottom of the screen. This will tell users there is more without the need for icons and text. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Apple does this in their iOS Mail app. The last item doesn't fit completely so it's immediately clear there is more content.


1

As Brian points out, 'the fold' is a rather antiquated concept (see UX Myths: people don't scroll) that has, for the most part, been remedied by time. What's brought the problem back is this trend to have single page web sites that act more like full-screen powerpoint slides. The challenge is that this actually re-introduces the problem of the fold. The ...


1

Well, you have two paths: implicit or explicit. An implicit approach would be to rely on implied affordances and user's past experiences. Thus, you could rely on the user noticing the scroll bar denotes additional content, or simply make your screen height's value 90vh. Needless to say these approaches aren't the best UX. On the other side, an explicit ...


1

The best way to do it is after the End of the Current Story. The only way you can be sure the User loves the content he sees if he reaches the bottom of the page reading your story. So, instead of forcing him stories to the side or forcing the next story to appear on scrolling or other tactics, keep it simple. If the user ends the current story or scoop of ...


1

The importance of those numbers is directly related to Social Proof. It validates the quality and relevance of the content by showing other people's interest in it. Quoting Smashing Mag: This principle tells us that we like to observe other people’s behaviour to judge what’s normal, and then we copy it. This article talks about this and other ...


1

A few recommendations: Ask users what they want and understand their priorities Can you identify target users of the intranet site and contact them to ask about the tasks they need to be able to complete on the intranet? Also ask them to identify for you the highest priority tasks that they need to complete, and rank them if possible. After gathering ...


1

Absolutely agree with avoiding me/you. In my experience, when people try to use these modifiers (e.g., "My Documents") it almost always introduces inconsistency. If it's "My Documents," Isn't it also "My Settings," "My Account," My Contacts," and so forth? And if everything is "Mine," why is it necessary to continually restate that? Is the user a ...



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