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3

As long as the footer does not need a long scroll to show up, I think this design is good. If all you had in that 'contact us' page was just this small to fit in a footer, this new design would also be getting rid of unnecessary white space and an additional click.


3

This seems like the kind of thing you should test with a card sort. Get as many potential users, company employees, stakeholders of the site as you can to provide input on the titles of these menu items. (This lets the stakeholders get their say in, but also gives you some research to point to if it becomes necessary to contradict them) Alternatively you ...


3

If the data that will be available is truly 'meta' and not essential to the use of the app, then, for the sake of clarity, leave it out. Providing placeholder or partial data is unlikely to positively affect the experience. When there's enough data available to be useful to the user, introduce the UI component. Regarding your concern that the user may ...


3

Anticipated content is not useful content (unless you expect the user to stay and refresh the page in case the content becomes available). Not knowing how big the space this unavailable data occupies (and assuming the worst that its significantly large), it may take up space that could inhibit the other data from being seen right away (i.e. content being ...


2

Yes, if you are actually going to read the feedback If you are prepared to read the feedback, it's always good to allow users to submit optional feedback. A common layout for this is: This requires users to select a category, but allows them to also write comments optionally. Note that if you do this, you should actually try to read the comments, ...


2

I would suggest that having a "Free area" or a separate section of the site where everything on offer is free might attract users to that part of the site but probably won't generate a lot of traffic to areas where items must be paid for. An alternative solution might be to mix free items with paid items in whatever other cataloguing system you have but ...


2

As you mentioned, both ways are valid and could work as long as each one is user-friendly. So, there is no right or wrong, but you want to know what works best. I guess that the answer can't be 'the first' or 'the second' so you have to test it. I would do a usability test in both versions to see which of the two versions is more usable. However, I don't ...


2

A tough question Benny. I read an article a few years ago that talked about online papers versus hardcopy papers. It didn't answer your question unfortunately however it did make this interesting quote: The paper cites other researchers on the subject who have theorized that the layout of online pages—which often insert ads mid-story or force readers to ...


1

I'm currently in a similar situation. In my opinion it's actually not two alternative approaches, but more like adding an 'extra feature' to the main navigation – at least that's how the situation is in the project I'm currently involved in: main navigation + sub-categories on pages main navigation with sub-categories in hover + sub-categories on pages ...


1

If you are following the rule of a smart presenter and dumb slides then animation in the content certainly breaks that rule... Not knowing anything about the contents of the deck, there are some obvious things that I can point out which doesn't require research: Animations takes more time to present, and a 10 minute pitch doesn't give you much time to ...


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I think there are two primary reasons for this: Historical When news services started putting content online, they focused on the differentiating factors of online news services vs print services. That meant focusing on up to the minute news rather than a curated selection of news which had been chosen to give a recap of the previous day's news. ...


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If I am correct in understanding your question, you want to avoid users from downloading content only to realize after download that its the same. The concept of visited links has been around from a very long time. In today's world with greater browser capabilities, devices becoming more personal and the ability of cookies to store lot more defaults you ...


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One of the base requirements for information systems like websites and newspapers is that content must be findable. The classic press has developed patterns for that over centuries, e.g. Headline, Byline, Lead, Teaser, Sections, Front Page, Pull-Quote, Insert, Side Columns, Obituary, Classified Ad etc. Some of them seem inherent to or at least afforded by ...


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Make as little of the content obligatory as possible before the form can be submitted. Users should be able to return to it later and add extra info if they want to.


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Take a look at these websites: www.roomorama.com www.wimdu.com www.9flats.com https://www.vayable.com/experiences-edit/new https://www.stay4free.com/step1 On many of these sites, you can simply sign up with Facebook and access the listing property page. In the last two links I think those have their sections broken down very well.


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I don't think it is possible to give a 'correct' answer, as such thing depends on many variables. For example, do users enter the site in explorer mode, or in task-completion mode? Anyhow, analytics data such as Average Time on Page (ATOP)can give some guidance for this ratio - the larger the ATOP is, the larger should be the content area. The existence ...


1

It depends on your type of application/website you are delivering; Structuring the Navigation with content is very important process in IA. You have to categorize the goal as primary and secondary to display the navigation+content. If you can achieve your goal through displaying 70% content area then why not to use that theme. I would say there is no ...


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In this case, convention is on your side. Users inherently expect that they will find navigation on the left or top of a site. By employing contrasting background colors and other emphasis techniques, you can keep your navigation satisfyingly small and users will still have little to no problem finding it. You can look at this very page for an example. The ...


1

I think the best solution to this problem is to have both. Create a contact us page. This page will be rich in detail and can include things such as: a list of relevant contacts at the company, including names, emails, phone numbers etc. location map(s) a contact form company social media a set of FAQs for common contact us issues links to other relevant ...


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There is several tricks. Split information to paragraphs with different level headers. Like you can see at wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_(grammar) Hide information and show the wide button [show more]. Don't forget about formatting. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Hide some paragraphs under ...


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Adding to some approaches mentioned in @Pierre's answer. You could use some visual elements that hide portions of the information (text, in your case) and display the hidden portions instantly on demand (usually, following user's action, such mouse click). Such visual elements include, but are not limited to, tabs, expanding text panels and widgets (I'm sure ...


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It actually all depends on the purpose of your site and of course of its users. If you take the example of a newspaper website, no one will argue that displaying a lot of text is bad practice. Such sites, however, have taken design steps to continually improve the experience for their users. One interesting idea is to take advantage of the "reader" feature ...


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This seems like a very narrow view. It definitely depends on what kind of website it is and what you're trying to get the user to do. First tell the user story-what are they there for? What are the top 1-3 tasks they are there to do? And then you'll be able to tell if any of these things would be useful. For instance: Number of subscribers. If ...



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