Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

tl;dr 3 positive options, 1 neutral and 1 negative, and that makes 5 in total to strike a balance. The choice of labels and emoji/smiley should target the least negative emotion and the least positive emotion; because you have to cross the minimum threshold to be in the extreme/maximum. If you are fishing for data then this is the best option. Also emotions ...


3

This seems like the kind of thing you should test with a card sort. Get as many potential users, company employees, stakeholders of the site as you can to provide input on the titles of these menu items. (This lets the stakeholders get their say in, but also gives you some research to point to if it becomes necessary to contradict them) Alternatively you ...


3

I'd add annoyed and bored. Happiness sounds like a consequence of being excited or amused and indifferent could just be no vote but if you want to keep it neutral you can use something like: Excited - Amused - Indifferent - Bored - Annoyed


3

Bias toward positive emotions 3 of the 5 are positive emotions: Happy, Excited, Amused 1 of 5 is nuetral emotions: Indifferent 1 of 5 is negative emotions: Angry You're setting up your ratings for a positive bias from the get go. Terminology Not everyone that doesn't like the content of an article is angry. What if the content is just poorly written, ...


3

If the data that will be available is truly 'meta' and not essential to the use of the app, then, for the sake of clarity, leave it out. Providing placeholder or partial data is unlikely to positively affect the experience. When there's enough data available to be useful to the user, introduce the UI component. Regarding your concern that the user may ...


3

Anticipated content is not useful content (unless you expect the user to stay and refresh the page in case the content becomes available). Not knowing how big the space this unavailable data occupies (and assuming the worst that its significantly large), it may take up space that could inhibit the other data from being seen right away (i.e. content being ...


2

A tough question Benny. I read an article a few years ago that talked about online papers versus hardcopy papers. It didn't answer your question unfortunately however it did make this interesting quote: The paper cites other researchers on the subject who have theorized that the layout of online pages—which often insert ads mid-story or force readers to ...


2

Yes, if you are actually going to read the feedback If you are prepared to read the feedback, it's always good to allow users to submit optional feedback. A common layout for this is: This requires users to select a category, but allows them to also write comments optionally. Note that if you do this, you should actually try to read the comments, ...


2

I would suggest that having a "Free area" or a separate section of the site where everything on offer is free might attract users to that part of the site but probably won't generate a lot of traffic to areas where items must be paid for. An alternative solution might be to mix free items with paid items in whatever other cataloguing system you have but ...


2

For transactional emails, it's better to give the information front and center so that the user can easily get the information he's looking for. So, it will work for little content with a direct CTA. However,if you even have a paragraph of content, don't center align it. It has readability issues. This particular guide to transactional emails can help you ...


2

You want to know whether tabs are a good idea. It's good that you're asking, because they are not. In the Windows UX guidelines, Microsoft asks a series of questions to help developers and designers determine when a tab is the right control. Here's an excerpt: If used for settings, are settings on different pages completely independent? Will changing a ...


2

As you mentioned, both ways are valid and could work as long as each one is user-friendly. So, there is no right or wrong, but you want to know what works best. I guess that the answer can't be 'the first' or 'the second' so you have to test it. I would do a usability test in both versions to see which of the two versions is more usable. However, I don't ...


1

The importance of those numbers is directly related to Social Proof. It validates the quality and relevance of the content by showing other people's interest in it. Quoting Smashing Mag: This principle tells us that we like to observe other people’s behaviour to judge what’s normal, and then we copy it. This article talks about this and other ...


1

If you are following the rule of a smart presenter and dumb slides then animation in the content certainly breaks that rule... Not knowing anything about the contents of the deck, there are some obvious things that I can point out which doesn't require research: Animations takes more time to present, and a 10 minute pitch doesn't give you much time to ...


1

I'm currently in a similar situation. In my opinion it's actually not two alternative approaches, but more like adding an 'extra feature' to the main navigation – at least that's how the situation is in the project I'm currently involved in: main navigation + sub-categories on pages main navigation with sub-categories in hover + sub-categories on pages ...


1

I think there are two primary reasons for this: Historical When news services started putting content online, they focused on the differentiating factors of online news services vs print services. That meant focusing on up to the minute news rather than a curated selection of news which had been chosen to give a recap of the previous day's news. ...


1

If I understand your question correctly, you're trying to learn the user's inbound search terms and tailor your content accordingly, correct? You used to be able to do this by looking at inbound search terms from Google, but as of 2013, Google encrypted almost all searches so that it's no longer possible. It's a boon for privacy, but a defeat of a large ...


1

If I am correct in understanding your question, you want to avoid users from downloading content only to realize after download that its the same. The concept of visited links has been around from a very long time. In today's world with greater browser capabilities, devices becoming more personal and the ability of cookies to store lot more defaults you ...


1

One of the base requirements for information systems like websites and newspapers is that content must be findable. The classic press has developed patterns for that over centuries, e.g. Headline, Byline, Lead, Teaser, Sections, Front Page, Pull-Quote, Insert, Side Columns, Obituary, Classified Ad etc. Some of them seem inherent to or at least afforded by ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible