Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

Underlining non-link text is a sort of usability crime. Underline is a standard way of visualizing links, especially when the default blue isn't use for links, so underline can confuse web users as to what's a link. Even in desktop applications, underlined text often means "I'm clickable". Everyone knows that text that’s underlined, or is a different ...


9

I built a comment moderation system for a site with 50k new posts a month where each post could have N comments. Our approach was to use flag for moderation buttons near each post and on each comment, which executed an ajax call to the moderation backend and notified the user of the action. In the backend, moderators had access to two separate lists ...


8

Yes, there are valid use cases, all of which probably are in a very specific field of work/study where underline has a particular meaning. An example: if your users want to write things in RuleSpeak (a notation system for SBVR documents) in the CKEditor, convention dictates they underline terms. An image of what you typically see in these documents: ...


6

Is there ever a valid use-case for having text underlined on a website? Yes, and your question contains the answer : the client has taken it upon themselves to emphasize text by underlining it So emphasize seems to be a valid use case to some people. I do not think either this people are doing wrong according to you (or more widely agreed ...


5

Assuming the "U" button puts selected text in the <u> element, there might be a very narrow use case for it. From the most recent HTML spec from the WHATWG: The u element represents a span of text with an unarticulated, though explicitly rendered, non-textual annotation, such as labeling the text as being a proper name in Chinese text (a Chinese ...


5

for a 40+ user group, avoid 'manage' itself. Make the links even more self-explanatory. 'Create New Page' 'Edit a Page' 'Add/Edit Categories' 'Approve/Remove Comments' non-tech savvy ppl have a tendency to get lost in the page structure, so a link called 'Pages' which has links to 'add page' and 'edit page' will add to confusion. Ofc if you have 20+ links ...


4

There is no definite answer for this. From both usability and implementation perspective, the two are rather different; and they fall into record-editing strategies. Records can be presented in a tabular form, but events on a calendar are also considered records. Essentially, the decision boils down to a few main factors: How complicated the record is: ...


3

The goal of a TOS document is legal protection. A plain text / HTML document does this better than a PDF document, so there is little (if any) benefit to including a PDF version. The UX question should really be about making the TOS more human (rather than lawyer) readable, as that is an area where most sites can improve a lot.


3

Are you looking for an expression builder/predicate editor? I have some examples in this post, #6 build an expression: http://designingwebinterfaces.com/15-common-components The example from Wufoo allows for any or all of the conditions to be applied. What we found in testing in numerous different industries is that most non-programmer people don't ...


3

There are a number of factors, some of which are beyond the interface's control like the nature of the content, but one factor in your control is how to handle identity. Disqus published a blog post and infographic a few months ago looking at policies of real-names vs. pseudonyms vs. complete anonymity, and found that pseudonyms (stable but user-defined) ...


3

You are confusing the user interface with the information architecture of the site. Just because you have a hierarchy that shows the product in two places does not mean that you should maintain two separate pages of product information, pricing, etc. For example, on a clothing store you might list stuff under /clothing/summer/product, and you might also ...


3

I'm a content writer and I feel your pain about "content as after-thought" or sometimes "not important." So glad you posted this question. Sometimes it helps to show clients what their competitors are doing -- who shows up first in search results in their business categories, what those websites are saying, how user-friendly the sites are, and especially ...


2

There is a very nice paper for Information Architecture (which is only a module of what you're probably asking) here If you feel that, that is what you're looking for, you might want to take a deeper look into Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites Although IA doesn't solve the problem directly, you'll find that it ...


2

I'm not sure this can be 'solved' by a Pro and Con list being discussed. There are at least 3 aspects that should be considered: 1. User Experience Making sure the site is usable for both consumers as well as internal people. Very important and usually the domain of UX people. 2. Technical expertise Making sure the CMS fits into the most likely existing ...


2

TOC and Wizard pattern (step navigation) provide totally different interactoions. This aspect is more important than just tap counting. TOC suggests arbitrary access to items and doesn't guarantee visiting each item. So other side of TOC's flexibility is loosing certainty. TOC breaks smooth flow and creates "jumpy" interaction. TOC forces user to think and ...


2

I think a step system makes for better navigation as it always on the screen and the user can clearly see where they are as well as having a summary of the steps to help them go directly to the step they want to edit. Remember, your user will almost certainly use the stepped form to edit as well as create and the route through the process will be different ...


2

Spreadsheets are useful up to a point but they are unmanageable for large amounts of rich content. I've been using GatherContent recently. I've not yet used it on a multi-language project but I imagine you could either create a site structure for each language version or include a field to collect each language on each page (e.g. each product page would have ...


2

Ordering this content by when it was last edited or updated seems like a rather confusing approach, especially given that users bring a typical news streams and calendar timelines paradigm with them. If not confusing to the user, this would be rather frustrating and require users to learn a different approach to your timeline only. I tried to come up with ...


2

sounds like you already have 3 stand-in groups of users. Students, Professors, Parents. See if you can use what data you have from your 21 "personas" to create 3 proper ones. With an existing site, there ought to be analytics. Dig through that to see if there's common paths / pages that people visit to see if you can discern what are some of the common ...


2

If you are creating your site using WordPress, then the use of categories and/or tags may be of some help as it will allow you to filter your previous published posts via the category/tag. You would then be able to see that you have 5 post on one specific topic. This would not prevent you from writing a duplicate article, but it would allow you to check the ...


1

Look for usage data. With an existing site there should hopefully be log files sitting around, or analytics set up. With those you should be able to put usage numbers next alongside whatever site audit you do. Hopefully in association with whatever conversion/action metrics the client cares about (remember - low volume access doesn't necessarily mean low ...


1

I, personally, would remove pre-filled altogether, as it isn't really necessary to know that the form is partially filled out for you. That's kind of obvious when you click the link and see it filled out. In your example, there doesn't seem to be much data that's filled out for you anyway. I could see the benefit of wanting to say something if most of the ...


1

The solution depends on the organization and how it creates and manages its content. Ultimately, there are a few ingredients needed in order to track and manage content responsibly: All content should be stored in some kind of data format, preferably a database. This allows you to run quick / easy analytics on all content at once. Content creation should ...


1

A simple sitemap and some basic information architecture comes in handy before you start / during your wireframing proces. Together with your client you can write down this simple sitemap. Giving you both a basic idea of the actual content/copy of the website. It also really depends on what kind of website you are working on. For example, a website such as ...


1

Unless you are certain that users will want to plod through the entire page and read everything on it, I would stay away from breaking it up into pages. The number one reason to keep it all on a page is not to break text search. If the content were clearly differentiable into different kinds of content, meaning a user would know which of the different ...


1

It is not clear to me what you have available as options for changing the content presentation, but here are a few things you could try. Collapsible Sections A Table of Contents before the main body of the content (with each section linked) for a page's content You still need to follow standards for good type layout, including font size, line-height, ...


1

The extra clicking in between each step seems unnecessary. Also, I'm assuming that the steps go in chronological order. Why not have a simple "Step 1/5" text for mobile and a larger wizard or progress tracker for web? This will allow you to add multiple steps in the future without adding clicks. The "better description" part is confusing me. Why can't ...


1

Irith, This is how I understand your question: "How do I store information in a table so I know which widget it belongs to?" Is that correct? If so, you're describing a simple relational database. A solution would be to have three tables: Content Platform list Widget list You relate a piece of Content to a value in the Platform list and the ...


1

When it comes to organize stuff in meaningful chunks of information, the philosophy you are about to follow are the Principles of Grouping. In your case, making chunks of information meaningful to the end user, the similarity rule is most prominent. As this is a widget I assume that you will divide content with horizontal rules or different screens. Either ...


1

I've worked on a few projects recently where, for whatever reason, the decision was made to move away from integrating with an existing CMS and instead to design management interfaces and processes as part of the project. This is great in theory because you have the opportunity to design something that meets the particular needs of the project. However, you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible