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From the images provided, I would recommend going with shorter, less lengthy, tooltips in general. Google, for instance, on their account creation page has the following tool tips: For Usernames: For passwords: Now you may be asking, but what about password length? For their validation they have the following: Google uses only ...


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While I agree that similar information should be presented in similar ways it's also important to remember the way you're presenting it in a tool tip. The tool tip is generally viewed as an acceptable way to pass very small chunks of information to users while they are using the interface. Passing extended information this way is generally not good for ...


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The UI you have presented is not consistent either. It has visual consistency. But the interaction is not consistent. When a user adds a form, it is added below the dropdown, but when a new field is added, it is done above it. This affects consistency as well. The user has to get used to one of this pattern (either adding above or below). Otherwise, it ...


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Consistency + heirarchy = mo betta There's nothing wrong with consistency among controls. I think the problem you're sensing is hierarchy. In your example, adding a field (the low-level item) is more prominent than added a form (the high-level item). The controls are identical, but the ground contrast is greater within the form edit module. With a few ...


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The ideal answer is "test both" and see which works better for your users. Without testing, if you have to make a choice, clarity always trumps consistency. Focusing on your specific answer, I would suggest a different UX pattern for adding fields to make it even more different than adding a form. For example, eliminating the dropdown completely, and ...



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