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122

Because, at the table, a shaker is entirely the wrong dispenser for sugar. Shakers are used to sprinkle small amounts of a substance over an area, which is exactly what you want for salt and pepper. Sugar is used to sweeten drinks by adding a relatively large amount, which is just dumped in the drink and not spread over an area. If you tried to do that with ...


64

Salt and pepper are (generally) used in smaller amounts. A sugar packet also is a sort of measuring unit; it's roughly as much as a sugar cube. That means that you can use it for coffee and tea without having to pay attention to how much you use. Sugar clumps faster than salt and pepper do, I think, so you don't want any tea/coffee steam to clog up the ...


34

Definately keep the order of the buttons the same on all parts. There is nothing more disturbing than clicking a delete button where on the previous page there was a edit button. As for the order, I would suggest ordering them by what you want users to click most often. Use UI design to guide the application user.


22

I have conducted a study recently to ascertain whether a click menu or hover menu is more suitable for one of our larger financial client sites... these are my findings. I hope they are of some use or help to you: In summary: In general, hover menus are indeed expected behaviour on most sites, however it should be duly noted that on sites that are ...


22

It's to do with a combination of the granularity of the substance you're using, and the amount that you want to use. Table salt and (ground) pepper have fairly small granules, and so flow well from a shaker, and you usually use a fairly small amount of them. So a shaker is a good solution. Sugar typically has larger granules, and hence flows poorly. In ...


20

Fulfilling user expectations is a fine goal, but it’ll only get you so far. Unexpected results are not themselves bad. Sometimes they are even delightful (“Surprise!”). However, unexpected things in a UI are a sign of a usability problem. To resolve conflicts between kinds of consistency, you need to analyze the situation for the impacts of violating ...


17

Wikipedia seems to be popular with the information so far... :) So here's info from the history section of the page on caps lock The Caps Lock key is a modified version of the Shift lock key that occupies the same position on the keyboards of mechanical typewriters. An early innovation in mechanical typewriters was the introduction of a second ...


14

It is best to order them logically and group similar actions together. In your case with only three, the order that you have them now is good. However one thing that you really should do it to move the delete button away so that it is not with other action buttons. I would place it aligned to the right to reduce the likelihood that it is accidentally ...


14

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important. Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/ Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to ...


13

Typically, salt and pepper are applied uniformly over a meal. Sugar on the other hand is mostly used to supplement tea or coffee in solution. As such, the precision of the application of the condiment is much less important. It will just be stirred in later.


12

2007 article from NN/g Breadcrumb Navigation Increasingly Useful Summary: One line of text shows a page's location in the site hierarchy. User testing shows many benefits and no downsides to breadcrumbs for secondary navigation. Consistency is a key principle for UX design. If you implement breadcrumb for some pages and not for others, you are breaking ...


12

The [x] buttons on windows is meant to close the window. A [Close] button is meant to close the window. So, yes, they are meant to do the same thing. The operation of closing a window in some cases (a) closes the app, (b) in some cases minimizes the app (or hides it altogether) and (c) in some cases closes only that window. Examples: (a) A single ...


11

There's no official name, but I like to call it consistency. It describes it and is clear enough that a special name isn't needed. It also applies to more than just names.


11

Option 1 by far. Please tell them that mouse distance is only one of many UX factors that need considered. Scan-ability - Knowing that the buttons are always at the bottom will cut out a lot of cognation and time for the user. Who says the users curser will start from the top? Think about where your curser is right now? is it near the top? or the middle ...


11

Regarding Microsoft abandoning adaptive menus when creating Office 2007, have a look at this video with principal group program manager on the Microsoft Office UX team Jensen Harris: The Story of the Ribbon (at around 07:45)


11

If different users are using the different applications, then from a user's perspective, consistency across the applications is pointless. It's irrelevant to them. So, to the user, it doesn't matter. If the same users used both apps, then there may very well be reasons to introduce consistency, but even then, it'd depend on a lot of factors. From a ...


11

There is a misconception in the question in the idea that sugar would even be in a shaker at a restaurant table. The sugar you see on a table at a restaurant is not the type of sugar you'd ever see in a shaker. As other's have pointed out, confectioners sugar would be in a shaker, but there's no need for confectioners sugar at a table. You have granular ...


10

I think this is the logical order. Create | Edit | Delete And definitely keep the same throughout the application.


10

This is a bug with the Google UI, and not intentional. You were right to notice the distinction, but it shouldn't be used as any kind of example of good design. As of now (March 2015), Google is in the middle of a long process of migrating its apps and platforms to Material Design, and it will take a while before most apps are compliant. Material Design ...


9

Seems to me you need dropdowns like those below that open up on click not hover - with the down arrow acting as the affordance.


9

Consistency for the sake of consistency alone is ... silly. The navigation should match the content available, not conform to some arbitrary rules. People are well enough aware of how drop-down menus work at this point. If there is an arrow pointing down next to a navigation label, users will expect sub-menus. No arrows, no sub-menus. If there is a concern ...


9

I agree that for this design (Programmers.SE) there should be an outline on the check mark, as there is one on the up and down vote buttons. This would make it look more consistent as well as clear. Also, the check mark should have a less "polished" look to it, maybe more rough marker-like swish.


9

Users will notice. Interfaces that display the same information in different ways increases the cognitive load placed upon the user which makes the experience inefficient. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Allowing the user's eye to track vertically along a continuous line is a visual guide you provide which tells ...


8

The "Log In" form is where most people have come to expect to find it, and that makes the choice logical. They would have to have a good reason to put it anywhere else. The "Sign Up" form on the other hand is the focus of the page, and is laid out in a way that makes the most sense for that task. Once again a good choice. Consistency is a good thing, as ...


8

The size (length) of a field is a matter of usability in that it can provide a valuable affordance to the user. Take the following example: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Even without labels you can probably guess what the fields are: download bmml source Obligatory Wroblewsky quote (The above example ...


8

Yes, if there is a good reason to have two different style forms. Remember that you should break any UX guideline when you have a good reason to. Consistency is one of those, but it is one that you should look at carefully before breaking it. The biggest test is going to be whether users find it odd or problematic. Make your decision primarily from what ...


8

Yes, different countries have different definitions for that floor. In the UK the 'street' level floor is called 'Ground Floor', whereas in the US they simply call it '1st floor'. So it depends on whether it's a British lift or an American elevator. See more and even more. There are similar differences with many other words. One billion (historically at ...


7

Somewhere near the end of the thesis they reference a paper from 2004 which discusses this very subject. A comparison of static, adaptive, and adaptable menus. abstract Software applications continue to grow in terms of the number of features they offer, making personalization increasingly important. Research has shown that most users prefer the ...


7

I think you have to consider two things: Learnability does work in certain cases. Good article on this subject: When is learnability more important than usability? This site is for web professionals and not for average users


7

I don't recall a common name for the rule, but I found two definitions of the situation that you're trying to prevent: In software, when words have several meanings, this is called overloading. Your rule would be 'avoid overloading names/words'. Ambiguity is a more general term for the same thing. So the rule could be 'use unambiguous names /words/terms' ...



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