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9

My suggestion: Delete John Doe? You will lose his financing and payout information. [Cancel] [Delete] Make clear what action will occur. Use verbs in the text.


8

Great question. I've been thinking a lot about "confirmless deletes" because of a behavioral issue with models that is outlined here. In short, most users actually intend to delete an item when they initiate the interaction, so throwing up a traditional confirmation is annoying most of the time. I totally agree with Lauren's answer on the basic ...


4

How critical/catastrophic would this operation be? Trivial: no prompt needed; rather, provide a simple undo button. Non critical or easily undone: prompt near the button, as to not annoy users too much and make them lose focus. Critical and can't be undone: centered in the page


4

Severity and recoverability of the action can help guide the style you use. Also the platform you're on. Platform standards also playing a role. Dialog vs. Undo This was discussed in the following Q&A. When dialogs vs. undos make sense: Deletion: Confirm or Undo? Which is the better option and why? Slide to Delete Gestures on mobile devices ...


4

Normally when users submit something they expect a response, and they expect this response to match their inquiry. When users submit their order they expect to be told whether it was submitted successfully or not, not taken back to the menu. If you think of the process analogous to a real food order how would you feel if the clerk took your payment and then ...


3

By deleting this person you will also delete (lose) the following related data: financing - x records payout - y records Are you sure you want to delete this person? [Cancel] [Delete] And I would make Cancel the default (enter key)


3

No. This will potentially lead to annoyed users who start spam clicking on buttons, which defeats the purpose of having a confirmation step in the first place. When should you use modal? When you're dealing with uncommon one-off actions with potentially serious consequences (e.g. irreversible delete of multiple records). The modal gives you room to explain ...


3

Great question, really! The problem does not lie in Yes or No. But if the action is Positive or Negative. For example, "Are you sure to permanently delete System32?" Yes No "Are you sure you want to backup this photo?" Yes No As you can see here, the principle of good design is violated. If you specify Yes or No in the UI of your website/app, ...


3

Navigating as a side effect of some other action is not a good idea, I feel. Similar to pushing the user around... Why not show an empty Topic page where some stuff looks like it will look after approval, such as title and creator link (if any), while the content area (where posts will appear after approval) shows a message saying "Topic is waiting for ...


2

Yes, I'd say you are correct. The standards are: let the user do what they want to do, but provide a way to undo let the user do what they want to do, but confirm before doing


2

1) Unfortunately, I do not have data on conversion loss for that. 2) It depends of the importance of what you enter your email for. Having to type your email twice is not a good UX. Plus, many people will simply copy-paste the first email field into the second, making the "confirm email" field rather useless. 3) My recommendation would to NOT put a second ...


2

It's not recommendable to use the word Cancel in pop-up/alert boxes. You could use another wording like close or quit. You have several good combinations for the buttons, here is just one (for example, you could change Cancel for "No, stay"): download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups In the case you decide to use it, you ...


2

The answer, not surprisingly, is "it depends on the app". (eg how catastrophic is the loss, is it recoverable, how familiar are users with the app, and other parameters that are specific to your application). But the good news is, you've already laid out the options very thoughtfully in order of progressive levels of disclosure, so you're 90% of the way ...


2

Reducing the number of fields on a form typically increases conversions, however you can go too far sometimes. A user will have an expected number of fields for task, if you are asking for just an e-mail address when an user expects name, email and password. They might not be sure it's the correct form or as Zanon mentions might think it is a scam. Also as ...


2

As you have already asked about the security concerns at security.stackexchange.com, I can give my opinion about the UX perspective: Do you know any service where you register and it requires only a valid e-mail prior to filling your username/password/other data? I've never seen something like this. If you don't run a popular website, a few people ...


2

You could use wordings that describe where the user will land after clicking the buttons, rather than their relations to the immediate action (which creates this paradox you highlighted): Go/Return to Login/Front page Continue Sign-Up


2

the anwser will depend on your context. In a lot of guidelines, they advice to put a verb or very short sentence (Verb + subject) in confirmation box button. Would you like to send an email instead of print to save paper? Send Email Take a print I advice to read this : ...


1

Ill go as far as saying: dont confirm the cancellation of the sign up. but on the login screen afterwards, provide a "no worries, continue signup where you left off"


1

The UX title is the mostly abused nowadays, with any web developer or designer that can draft up a wireframe in Balsamiq/Axure/UXPin etc. labeling themselves UX experts... So one would assume a UX Designer is former Graphic Designers that can make wireframes and pretty mockups. A UX Developer is most likely someone with more HTML/CSS and possible other ...


1

if deleting multiple objects You could provide a way to select multiple elements (checkbox) and a button to delete the selected rows (with a popup if the number of deleted rows is big enough). This way, you need 2 (spacially separated) clicks to delete one item, but only n+1 click to delete n items (or n+2 if you add a popup). There is a secondary ...


1

You should let user delete or edit without confirmation, which increase friction. Instead of confirmation, you should implement an undo action. Have a look on this example in Rails.


1

Confirmation in your case is necessary since else, it would become an easy way to spam emails to a list of emails with a bot without needing confirmation. Since the process of reminders can be automated after a single 3rd party API login and iterated with an array of emails, it will become very easy to exploit such a service and send reminder emails to ...


1

Loss of data is classified with the highest of severity when it comes to design issues. So only go with option 1 if you are 100% sure that the user will know what he is doing. Option 2 will lead to frustration. The last thing you want to tell your users is that an action may have negative consequences. They'll immediately hesitate, and wish that you'd ...


1

Just change the text of the button to 'Add Another' or 'Add More' to indicate user has already bought this item and he can add more such items if he prefers. I think ebay or amazon has this type of shopping cart.


1

If you try entering an invalid email address in Google contacts, and press Back, it gets saved without validation. This is bad UX. Also, the Back button itself has a lot of ambiguity when it comes to navigation and form submission. http://www.androiduipatterns.com/2011/12/back-button-androids-achilles-heel.html ...


1

A rule of thumb is: What is the impact of an incorrect choice? Consider Is change permanent or reversible What is value of loss if any (this includes users time and data) Is it easy to rectify Is it clear what choice was made and the implications Impact ranges from Negligible (no permanent change, zero value loss, very easy to rectify; no chance of ...


1

Allowing the user to confirm or cancel the deletion more closely to the Delete button provides better context, and a faster interaction. Fitts’s Law is a good reference for this question. Fitts’s Law “predicts that the time required to rapidly move to a target area is a function of the ratio between the distance to the target and the width of the target.” ...


1

Feedback If your entity creation process has "serious" implications for your users, and especially if it may involve them taking actions outside your app (booking a ticket somewhere, buying something and retrieving a tracking number), you may want to print a summary page where they get key information about how you identify the entity they've created and ...


1

It looks like the area code mismatch is NOT an error which should halt and prevent the user from saving. I would propose you change the flow a little (see below) Changes: Allow the user save if area code does not match the state. Show a notification (not an error) under field(s) in question. Such approach will not force the user to save twice and ...



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