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19

This may be a case of the more you make users work, the less they try. I believe when confronted with a task, like trying to understand some content on a page, users do a quick estimate on whether the effort will be worth it or not. Too often we present users with extensive content and clicking just to tell them something that they already know or don’t ...


17

User confirmation is almost always a bad solution. It breaks the user's flow and there's a real risk of habitually clicking yes on the confirmation. It basically makes 99% of the actions require more attention to catch the 1% that go wrong. And it works poorly. This article explains it better than I can: http://alistapart.com/article/neveruseawarning Of ...


9

I like the idea of guessing a name because if you guess right, the user doesn't have to enter any text. If you pick a name for the user, you are left with two possible scenarios here: The user likes the name you chose for them The user doesn't like the name you chose for them Option #2 minimizes friction for both cases and is a very clean design with a ...


7

The expiration time should be the time it takes your system to send the e-mail, plus the time it takes a user to receive and read the e-mail, plus the time it takes a user to click the one-time confirmation link in the e-mail sent to the user, plus the time it takes your system to register the confirmation link. Plus any possible unforseen events at your ...


5

Rather than a second button or popup to ask for confirmation which I imagine would be a little fiddly and frustrating, consider using a long tap/click. The user would have to hold the appropriate button for ~3 seconds in order for their response to be accepted. I'd show a progress meter on that button while they are holding it. download bmml source ...


5

Confirmation is warranted when User initiated action will have significant consequence which cannot be undone The user initiated action itself may not be risky, but there is a severe side effect of the action that user needs to be aware of Please refer to http://www.uxdesignedge.com/2010/06/are-you-sure-how-to-write-effective-confirmations/ Note: But, ...


4

The more professional your site looks, the more trustworthy it is. Think that typo doesn't matter? It does - just as typo's in spam are a red flag for users, it's the same for other interfaces. Keep the number of colors down - if your page looks like mid-90's Geocities, it's not going to encourage people to come. Keep the language measured and professional ...


4

If you don't provide the user the possibility to turn off a single confirmation, it looks to me like a bad idea as it will probably be used to turn off a single useless or annoying confirmation without being able to evaluate the whole impact of this action. A better design may be to add a "Don't display this confirmation again" checkbox to each confirmation ...


4

If you go with a two-click confirmation process, you should ensure the design can't be tripped by a double-click. Worse would be if in the design a double-click could result in either a confirm-confirm or a confirm-cancel, depending on which end of the button they double-click. One way would of course be the second approach you mentioned, that of "using a ...


4

I've seen confirmation mails that decay and die over 2 hours and I've personally clicked on confirmation mails 4 months after their date of delivery and found them to be valid. Essentially - you should pick your decay algorithm (which determines when the validity is up) or formula based on the type of confirmation i.e. if its critical, casual or just a ...


3

Generally, I've understood this to mean that Y is the default, and if I hit something other than a Y or an N (such as hitting the spacebar, Enter, or even Q), it will use the Y option. You are correct that this implies that Y is the default, on pressing the Enter key. An input other then Y, N or Enter would generally product an error. Is this ...


3

It depends on how critical the delete operation. A simple "Warning! this action cannot be undone" will work - if your end-user is human. Certain applications have an automation feature or prone to get hacked by a program - in these cases a warning would not help, you will need something to halt the process. Mission critical applications (and even some Video ...


3

I want to challenge your descision to revoke their right to any kind of technical support for a service in exchange for being allowed access to beta or in-development features of said service. How are you going to evaluated those features if you do not have user feedback? Secondly, why don't you give them access to technical support? Is it for a principle ...


3

Good question! Stanford Guidelines for Web Credibility should help you. Tips to increase your site's reputation are good, too. Also it could be interesting for you to touch Persuasive Design. UPDATE There are several factors which influence site credibility and hence people more likely provide sensitive information. Modern and consistent visual ...


2

I'd suggest Using one of Google's design Principles which goes like Decide for me but let me have the final say Take your best guess and act rather than asking first. Too many choices and decisions make people unhappy. Just in case you get it wrong, allow for 'undo'. Google has implemented this in both of its Android and iOS Gmail app. When ...


2

There are pros and cons but confirming the email seems to be better. I once had typed equally wrong my password and it's confirmation on a registration. Thankfully I was able to change it through my email. The email is the most important thing of yours in a website registration, because it's through it that you manage your password and not only that but ...


2

From a user perspective, it's not necessary, especially if your welcome/thanks email don't give an additional message. And because UX takes care about business perspective too, it can be interesting to send an email after the validation. It strongly depends of your kind of website / business. In some cases, you could want the user remembers your website ...


2

Users do need confirmation e-mails. Those e-mails become receipts of sorts, or evidence, stating that the company acknowledged they were terminating the service. If the service, for whatever reason, was a paid service, the user would then have something tangible that could be used if legal action became necessary. For instance, if the service didn't ...


2

I think Matt's solution is the best but I'd also suggest a double tap with a visual feedback. The first tap fill an half of a rectangle and the second fill it completly, the choice is validated then. With this solution they don't have to wait for some seconds and can answer faster. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...


2

I didn’t think I would ever favor a confirm button click, but in your rare case, this is actually the best method. The circumstances here are a possibly overly tired user, who is woken up by an alarm and that has to take action. The user may be disorientated or affected by tranquilizers, which will have effect on the result. So at night time, which you’re ...


2

I think the problem is you are looking at the technological implementation instead of the user experience. The user generally doesn't care where they are saved, or how they are saved, only that they are saved. So instead of asking the user to deal with files, assume the user expects you to save them. It's then your choice of where to save them. Use a ...


1

I would like to propose that there should be three things the user should know at the end of a guided task flow: Whether his/her task was successfully completed, and what the results were. Whether he/she can create multiple objects with the same wizard, without leaving the create environment. Loop the create process. Whether there are next steps ...


1

As per request, my comment as an answer. On windows it is common practice that when changing settings these are preserved from then on. Which means that the new settings should survive stopping and starting the application. And that in general means saving them to file or to a database. To be blunt: I would curse - and probably remove - any application ...


1

I think this is like how Microsoft Word behaves when it asks for "save changes to normal.dot template?" or something like that. That gives me a knowledge that Microsoft Word might not, and able to save my changes as default for future documents (even though they didn't make it clear at first time, what the heck was normal.dot?). I think the best way to ...


1

Instead of a confirmation pop up after user has clicked the OK button, the better user experience would be adding a "Save changes to configuration file" check-box within the Settings window. User experience benefits include: 1. no annoying pop up after the OK action; 2. present all possible options when user is in Settings; 3. less clicks.


1

As quesoflorecido pointed out while its a confirmation from their system that you are now truly unsubscribed, its also a last way to potentially try and get you back into the system. Facebook does this by trying to get you a guilt trip where they show you images of friends who "might miss you" On the other hand groupon tries you to engage you again by ...


1

How much time should we give a newly registered user to click the confirmation link sent by email? You won't find one answer to this question as every organization and registration process has its own context and demands. Let me rephrase the question and see what comes up. Why is it important to make a hyperlink invalid? If your answer is ...


1

To have a quick display name you could also pick a name from the pool, which has the sence in your game world. For example, pick one randomly from the pool [Dragon, Knight, Golden Sword, ...]. As the name is given anyway (either by guessing or by picking), then options for choosing display name could be moved to edit profile screen, so you make connection ...


1

I think fading out the message is applicable when the message is just "informational" and the user could just as well carry on without having specifically read the message. e.g. "Your Tweet was sent successfully", "3 messages deleted" However if the user will want to very potentially want to interact with the message/want to read it fully I'd suggest a ...


1

I suspect games like that are counter-productive. It focuses the users on what they have to do to get rid of the annoying message and distracts them from the task and the implications of their actions. They get too busy typing "Delete" or whatever that they aren't thinking, "Wait a minute, what exactly am I deleting? Is now the time I should be deleting it? ...



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