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98

The site Good-UI argues for Undo: Try Undos instead of prompting for confirmation. Imagine that you just pressed an action button or link. Undos respect the initial human intent by allowing the action to happen smoothly first and foremost. Prompts on the other hand suggest to the user that he or she does not know what they are doing by questioning their ...


37

Delete with confirmation Delete with confirmation looks like this: Assuming the user tries to get from 1 to 3 (ie, she intended to perform action 2), the user has no interest in step 2b. We put delete-guards in place to reduce user errors, but if the action was intentional (which it is more often than not) step 2b is superfluous. Undo Undo, on the ...


33

What is the context of the question the user is answering, and what are the implications? This is the important question that helps guide the appropriateness of "Y" vs. "YES" (or "N" vs. "NO"). In this case you are dealing with a RSA certificate, which is a big deal. Accepting a certificate you don't mean to can have serious implications, so it is important ...


30

As a counter-argument to the (well-expressed) claims already stated in other answers, confirmation dialogs should be used when an action is not performed often and difficult to reverse. A common example is installing a program on your computer: Windows machines provide this confirmation dialog any time a program requests access to your administrator ...


28

From English.Stackexchange: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/5789/whats-the-difference-between-to-confirm-and-to-verify Verification requires external evidence. Confirmation requires a re-issuance of a believed statement. To use your example: 'Confirm user account' is asking the user from their perspective. 'Would you like to do this?'. ...


13

I would start with different (and larger) icons for the notes in the table/grid e.g. an icon of a note with a padlock for internal notes and icon of a chat symbol for external notes Then I'd consider moving the icons closer together, to make the differences between them more noticeable (to prevent user from only noticing one). Make sure they are not too ...


11

In the general case, I agree with Evil Closet Monkey: Undo creates less friction than Delete, so it is preferable. But there is at least one case where Delete+Confirm is preferable: When your users are overwhelmed. A user is overwhelmed when he wants to complete a task, but has no idea how to do it, and expects to fail. It can be so subtle that the user ...


9

My suggestion: Delete John Doe? You will lose his financing and payout information. [Cancel] [Delete] Make clear what action will occur. Use verbs in the text.


8

Great question. I've been thinking a lot about "confirmless deletes" because of a behavioral issue with models that is outlined here. In short, most users actually intend to delete an item when they initiate the interaction, so throwing up a traditional confirmation is annoying most of the time. I totally agree with Lauren's answer on the basic ...


7

I would say you should explicitly label them as such: Maybe even do a bootstrap-like popover notification when they hover the green, Client Notes, icon which explicitly states that These notes are visible to the client! Update After reading your comment I would like to update the answer to mention that adding alerts, confirmations, Captchas, etc...are ...


7

There would be a third way that i actually chose to implement in a small cms ui – and the clients seem to be happy with it so far. I also wanted to avoid the confirmation message and implementing undo just wasnt an option. So instead of adding an additional step after the user already tried to delete the content, I added a step before the user does so – so ...


5

This will largely depend on what the verification entails in terms of user access. Option 1 I would say that (option 2) sending a verification code is more secure as users will have to input their verification code before the verification is complete, particularly if this is part of login ( 2 step verification). Option 2 This being said if the ...


4

First of all, never count on users to read anything. Not. At. All. They won't, and by the time you are explaining to them that the label was Right! There! On! Their! Screen!, the damage has already been done. Consider making the micro-interaction for composing a customer-visible note strikingly different — and slightly more difficult — than writing an ...


4

It has absolutely no effect on security. Use both for maximized UX. If your priority is security, either one is fine. The purpose of the procedure is not to add a layer of security to your application, it's to verify that indeed the user has control over the email address he claims to be his. Email is insecure by default, your secret can leak no matter ...


4

The first thing I'd recommend is to divide the inputs into digestible chunks. Make sure you're not presenting all of the open fields on one form. Bring the user's focus to one section at a time. For example, use gentle highlights or outlines on the first section, and disable or even hide the next sections. The second things I'd recommend is to acknowledge ...


4

Yes there is a noticable difference. The user should Confirm they want to make the change but Verify that the email they entered is correct. Verify : to ascertain the truth or correctness of, as by examination, research, or comparison Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/verify Confirm : to acknowledge with definite assurance Source: ...


4

Severity and recoverability of the action can help guide the style you use. Also the platform you're on. Platform standards also playing a role. Dialog vs. Undo This was discussed in the following Q&A. When dialogs vs. undos make sense: Deletion: Confirm or Undo? Which is the better option and why? Slide to Delete Gestures on mobile devices ...


4

How critical/catastrophic would this operation be? Trivial: no prompt needed; rather, provide a simple undo button. Non critical or easily undone: prompt near the button, as to not annoy users too much and make them lose focus. Critical and can't be undone: centered in the page


3

While this answer may not relate to the titled question, it does relate to your particular case. I find the modal dialog itself very awkward, regardless of the color of the buttons. When a user enters text into the input field, the green add button (+) appears. Clicking this button enables the submit button (Update) and allows the user to add more ...


3

My rule of thumb is to use custom dialogs whenever possible. Lately, I've been using jQuery's modal dialog for this, but that's just because we're already using jQuery on our current project. This allows you to customize the look and feel to match the rest of your site. It also allows you to modify button text appropriately. For example, with the OS dialog, ...


3

Any cut-off you make will be at an arbitrary point in time, which may make sense for some users- but by equal amount not make sense for those who require access to legacy information. If you have the capacity to retain and provide access to all records, absolutely do so. Implementing arbitrary cut-offs break usage logic for the most part. With this in ...


3

Request Tracker (a trouble ticket system) handles this quite well. It has both comments (which are internal messages) and correspondence (which is sent to end users). When composing a message, the background of the textarea is white for comments, and light red (#fcc) for correspondence. The red background color makes you stop for a moment and consider who ...


3

I think the Android Gallery "filmstrip view" and its swipe-down-to-delete is a strong counter-example for the idea that "delete and undo" is preferable. It's easy to accidentally delete while trying to browse, and the same type of action (unintentional touching) that deletes can also move you away from the opportunity to undo. To me, this is a huge UX ...


3

Blocking the user is bad UX unless the operation is catastrophic (i.e. causing great damage and/or suffering)     Imagine the following scenario... You want to copy a folder full of files from one location to another so you begin the operation and the computer is nice enough to let you know that files are copying and that it will take about 2.5 ...


3

"Are you sure" type of confirmation messages are typically shown after button clicks for potentially destructive actions (e.g. irreversibly delete an item) or other actions that can have side effects the user may not know about (e.g. this item will no longer be searchable once its hidden). Most friend requests and invitation processes are single step ...


3

Navigating as a side effect of some other action is not a good idea, I feel. Similar to pushing the user around... Why not show an empty Topic page where some stuff looks like it will look after approval, such as title and creator link (if any), while the content area (where posts will appear after approval) shows a message saying "Topic is waiting for ...


3

By deleting this person you will also delete (lose) the following related data: financing - x records payout - y records Are you sure you want to delete this person? [Cancel] [Delete] And I would make Cancel the default (enter key)


2

I think the most simple and effective solution would be to change the labels and the interface of both modals. So there is a contextual and visual difference between the two functions. Because now the two different functions are almost the same in terms of Look & Feel, so people are likely to think it will work the same and will confuse the output of the ...


2

The answer is actually in the question: if you worry about users navigating away from a page that has a function they may need, offer that function elsewhere. Dialog with self I'm the user: "OK, let's register". "Fill in a few details". "Oh! I need to verify my email, let's check my inbox." "No, not there yet." "Hmm... let's click here see what happens." ...


2

I don't think either options is ideal. Save The problem with keeping is as 'save' is that the user has already performed an action. The user now expect (or predict) that something will happen. Now the error message shows, but now the user has to gather they need to use the same button for something else - to confirm they wish to save. This is confusing, ...



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