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100

The site Good-UI argues for Undo: Try Undos instead of prompting for confirmation. Imagine that you just pressed an action button or link. Undos respect the initial human intent by allowing the action to happen smoothly first and foremost. Prompts on the other hand suggest to the user that he or she does not know what they are doing by questioning their ...


37

Delete with confirmation Delete with confirmation looks like this: Assuming the user tries to get from 1 to 3 (ie, she intended to perform action 2), the user has no interest in step 2b. We put delete-guards in place to reduce user errors, but if the action was intentional (which it is more often than not) step 2b is superfluous. Undo Undo, on the ...


30

As a counter-argument to the (well-expressed) claims already stated in other answers, confirmation dialogs should be used when an action is not performed often and difficult to reverse. A common example is installing a program on your computer: Windows machines provide this confirmation dialog any time a program requests access to your administrator ...


28

From English.Stackexchange: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/5789/whats-the-difference-between-to-confirm-and-to-verify Verification requires external evidence. Confirmation requires a re-issuance of a believed statement. To use your example: 'Confirm user account' is asking the user from their perspective. 'Would you like to do this?'. ...


11

In the general case, I agree with Evil Closet Monkey: Undo creates less friction than Delete, so it is preferable. But there is at least one case where Delete+Confirm is preferable: When your users are overwhelmed. A user is overwhelmed when he wants to complete a task, but has no idea how to do it, and expects to fail. It can be so subtle that the user ...


9

My suggestion: Delete John Doe? You will lose his financing and payout information. [Cancel] [Delete] Make clear what action will occur. Use verbs in the text.


8

Great question. I've been thinking a lot about "confirmless deletes" because of a behavioral issue with models that is outlined here. In short, most users actually intend to delete an item when they initiate the interaction, so throwing up a traditional confirmation is annoying most of the time. I totally agree with Lauren's answer on the basic ...


7

There would be a third way that i actually chose to implement in a small cms ui – and the clients seem to be happy with it so far. I also wanted to avoid the confirmation message and implementing undo just wasnt an option. So instead of adding an additional step after the user already tried to delete the content, I added a step before the user does so – so ...


6

This will largely depend on what the verification entails in terms of user access. Option 1 I would say that (option 2) sending a verification code is more secure as users will have to input their verification code before the verification is complete, particularly if this is part of login ( 2 step verification). Option 2 This being said if the ...


6

My rule of thumb is to use custom dialogs whenever possible. Lately, I've been using jQuery's modal dialog for this, but that's just because we're already using jQuery on our current project. This allows you to customize the look and feel to match the rest of your site. It also allows you to modify button text appropriately. For example, with the OS dialog, ...


4

While this answer may not relate to the titled question, it does relate to your particular case. I find the modal dialog itself very awkward, regardless of the color of the buttons. When a user enters text into the input field, the green add button (+) appears. Clicking this button enables the submit button (Update) and allows the user to add more ...


4

The first thing I'd recommend is to divide the inputs into digestible chunks. Make sure you're not presenting all of the open fields on one form. Bring the user's focus to one section at a time. For example, use gentle highlights or outlines on the first section, and disable or even hide the next sections. The second things I'd recommend is to acknowledge ...


4

Yes there is a noticable difference. The user should Confirm they want to make the change but Verify that the email they entered is correct. Verify : to ascertain the truth or correctness of, as by examination, research, or comparison Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/verify Confirm : to acknowledge with definite assurance Source: ...


4

It has absolutely no effect on security. Use both for maximized UX. If your priority is security, either one is fine. The purpose of the procedure is not to add a layer of security to your application, it's to verify that indeed the user has control over the email address he claims to be his. Email is insecure by default, your secret can leak no matter ...


4

Severity and recoverability of the action can help guide the style you use. Also the platform you're on. Platform standards also playing a role. Dialog vs. Undo This was discussed in the following Q&A. When dialogs vs. undos make sense: Deletion: Confirm or Undo? Which is the better option and why? Slide to Delete Gestures on mobile devices ...


4

How critical/catastrophic would this operation be? Trivial: no prompt needed; rather, provide a simple undo button. Non critical or easily undone: prompt near the button, as to not annoy users too much and make them lose focus. Critical and can't be undone: centered in the page


3

Navigating as a side effect of some other action is not a good idea, I feel. Similar to pushing the user around... Why not show an empty Topic page where some stuff looks like it will look after approval, such as title and creator link (if any), while the content area (where posts will appear after approval) shows a message saying "Topic is waiting for ...


3

"Are you sure" type of confirmation messages are typically shown after button clicks for potentially destructive actions (e.g. irreversibly delete an item) or other actions that can have side effects the user may not know about (e.g. this item will no longer be searchable once its hidden). Most friend requests and invitation processes are single step ...


3

Blocking the user is bad UX unless the operation is catastrophic (i.e. causing great damage and/or suffering)     Imagine the following scenario... You want to copy a folder full of files from one location to another so you begin the operation and the computer is nice enough to let you know that files are copying and that it will take about 2.5 ...


3

I think the Android Gallery "filmstrip view" and its swipe-down-to-delete is a strong counter-example for the idea that "delete and undo" is preferable. It's easy to accidentally delete while trying to browse, and the same type of action (unintentional touching) that deletes can also move you away from the opportunity to undo. To me, this is a huge UX ...


3

By deleting this person you will also delete (lose) the following related data: financing - x records payout - y records Are you sure you want to delete this person? [Cancel] [Delete] And I would make Cancel the default (enter key)


2

I don't think either options is ideal. Save The problem with keeping is as 'save' is that the user has already performed an action. The user now expect (or predict) that something will happen. Now the error message shows, but now the user has to gather they need to use the same button for something else - to confirm they wish to save. This is confusing, ...


2

The main reason for preferring Undo over Confirmation Boxes is laid out by Alan Cooper in 'About Face 2.0, The Essentials of Interaction Design' Confirmations illustrate a quirk of human behavior: They only work when they are unexpected. If confirmations are offered in routine places, the user quickly becomes inured to them and routinely dismisses ...


2

For consumer apps and websites - delete with undo option For enterprise apps that staff use at work - delete with confirmation notification This is to prevent from employees deleting important stuff accidentally. Since "undo" function normally disappears after X seconds. That way, there is a real risk of items being deleted permanently by accident. ...


2

Yes, I'd say you are correct. The standards are: let the user do what they want to do, but provide a way to undo let the user do what they want to do, but confirm before doing


2

The answer, not surprisingly, is "it depends on the app". (eg how catastrophic is the loss, is it recoverable, how familiar are users with the app, and other parameters that are specific to your application). But the good news is, you've already laid out the options very thoughtfully in order of progressive levels of disclosure, so you're 90% of the way ...


1

Feedback If your entity creation process has "serious" implications for your users, and especially if it may involve them taking actions outside your app (booking a ticket somewhere, buying something and retrieving a tracking number), you may want to print a summary page where they get key information about how you identify the entity they've created and ...


1

Why not just doing this? If you have the freedom to change a little more the design you can follow a path to completion approach:


1

If you can't change the buttons, I would just widen the textarea to the full width of the box. And I would provide a reason for WHY you want me to give you a reason to delete something, like "We can make our service better with your feedback", or something along those lines.


1

I agree with Okavango, and this is a continuation of his answer. Different clients: Say your user is on the mobile app; that way it's more easier for him to enter a code and get on with his business. Whereas if it's a link, the process is: Register in app> email(to get link)> browser(for link verification)> open app for re-login. I'm going a step ...



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