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32

What is the context of the question the user is answering, and what are the implications? This is the important question that helps guide the appropriateness of "Y" vs. "YES" (or "N" vs. "NO"). In this case you are dealing with a RSA certificate, which is a big deal. Accepting a certificate you don't mean to can have serious implications, so it is important ...


28

From English.Stackexchange: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/5789/whats-the-difference-between-to-confirm-and-to-verify Verification requires external evidence. Confirmation requires a re-issuance of a believed statement. To use your example: 'Confirm user account' is asking the user from their perspective. 'Would you like to do this?'. ...


13

I would start with different (and larger) icons for the notes in the table/grid e.g. an icon of a note with a padlock for internal notes and icon of a chat symbol for external notes Then I'd consider moving the icons closer together, to make the differences between them more noticeable (to prevent user from only noticing one). Make sure they are not too ...


7

I would say you should explicitly label them as such: Maybe even do a bootstrap-like popover notification when they hover the green, Client Notes, icon which explicitly states that These notes are visible to the client! Update After reading your comment I would like to update the answer to mention that adding alerts, confirmations, Captchas, etc...are ...


7

The expiration time should be the time it takes your system to send the e-mail, plus the time it takes a user to receive and read the e-mail, plus the time it takes a user to click the one-time confirmation link in the e-mail sent to the user, plus the time it takes your system to register the confirmation link. Plus any possible unforseen events at your ...


5

Rather than a second button or popup to ask for confirmation which I imagine would be a little fiddly and frustrating, consider using a long tap/click. The user would have to hold the appropriate button for ~3 seconds in order for their response to be accepted. I'd show a progress meter on that button while they are holding it. download bmml source ...


4

I've seen confirmation mails that decay and die over 2 hours and I've personally clicked on confirmation mails 4 months after their date of delivery and found them to be valid. Essentially - you should pick your decay algorithm (which determines when the validity is up) or formula based on the type of confirmation i.e. if its critical, casual or just a ...


4

First of all, never count on users to read anything. Not. At. All. They won't, and by the time you are explaining to them that the label was Right! There! On! Their! Screen!, the damage has already been done. Consider making the micro-interaction for composing a customer-visible note strikingly different — and slightly more difficult — than writing an ...


4

Yes there is a noticable difference. The user should Confirm they want to make the change but Verify that the email they entered is correct. Verify : to ascertain the truth or correctness of, as by examination, research, or comparison Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/verify Confirm : to acknowledge with definite assurance Source: ...


4

The first thing I'd recommend is to divide the inputs into digestible chunks. Make sure you're not presenting all of the open fields on one form. Bring the user's focus to one section at a time. For example, use gentle highlights or outlines on the first section, and disable or even hide the next sections. The second things I'd recommend is to acknowledge ...


3

Request Tracker (a trouble ticket system) handles this quite well. It has both comments (which are internal messages) and correspondence (which is sent to end users). When composing a message, the background of the textarea is white for comments, and light red (#fcc) for correspondence. The red background color makes you stop for a moment and consider who ...


3

Generally, I've understood this to mean that Y is the default, and if I hit something other than a Y or an N (such as hitting the spacebar, Enter, or even Q), it will use the Y option. You are correct that this implies that Y is the default, on pressing the Enter key. An input other then Y, N or Enter would generally product an error. Is this ...


3

Any cut-off you make will be at an arbitrary point in time, which may make sense for some users- but by equal amount not make sense for those who require access to legacy information. If you have the capacity to retain and provide access to all records, absolutely do so. Implementing arbitrary cut-offs break usage logic for the most part. With this in ...


3

My rule of thumb is to use custom dialogs whenever possible. Lately, I've been using jQuery's modal dialog for this, but that's just because we're already using jQuery on our current project. This allows you to customize the look and feel to match the rest of your site. It also allows you to modify button text appropriately. For example, with the OS dialog, ...


3

While this answer may not relate to the titled question, it does relate to your particular case. I find the modal dialog itself very awkward, regardless of the color of the buttons. When a user enters text into the input field, the green add button (+) appears. Clicking this button enables the submit button (Update) and allows the user to add more ...


2

I think the problem is you are looking at the technological implementation instead of the user experience. The user generally doesn't care where they are saved, or how they are saved, only that they are saved. So instead of asking the user to deal with files, assume the user expects you to save them. It's then your choice of where to save them. Use a ...


2

Users do need confirmation e-mails. Those e-mails become receipts of sorts, or evidence, stating that the company acknowledged they were terminating the service. If the service, for whatever reason, was a paid service, the user would then have something tangible that could be used if legal action became necessary. For instance, if the service didn't ...


2

I think Matt's solution is the best but I'd also suggest a double tap with a visual feedback. The first tap fill an half of a rectangle and the second fill it completly, the choice is validated then. With this solution they don't have to wait for some seconds and can answer faster. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...


2

I didn’t think I would ever favor a confirm button click, but in your rare case, this is actually the best method. The circumstances here are a possibly overly tired user, who is woken up by an alarm and that has to take action. The user may be disorientated or affected by tranquilizers, which will have effect on the result. So at night time, which you’re ...


2

I think the most simple and effective solution would be to change the labels and the interface of both modals. So there is a contextual and visual difference between the two functions. Because now the two different functions are almost the same in terms of Look & Feel, so people are likely to think it will work the same and will confuse the output of the ...


2

The answer is actually in the question: if you worry about users navigating away from a page that has a function they may need, offer that function elsewhere. Dialog with self I'm the user: "OK, let's register". "Fill in a few details". "Oh! I need to verify my email, let's check my inbox." "No, not there yet." "Hmm... let's click here see what happens." ...


2

From a user perspective, it's not necessary, especially if your welcome/thanks email don't give an additional message. And because UX takes care about business perspective too, it can be interesting to send an email after the validation. It strongly depends of your kind of website / business. In some cases, you could want the user remembers your website ...


2

I don't think either options is ideal. Save The problem with keeping is as 'save' is that the user has already performed an action. The user now expect (or predict) that something will happen. Now the error message shows, but now the user has to gather they need to use the same button for something else - to confirm they wish to save. This is confusing, ...


1

I think that you should try to differentiate the columns more distinctly, something like that (I also moved both columns into one single pseudo column): At the picture above: I've used numbered links to show how many comments are attached to the items: using numbers instead of the similar icons will improve perception. I've used different colors to make ...


1

Although I'm not a fan of them, if this is important enough that you have had internal discussions sent to client in the past then ye olde alert box may be most appropriate here: If it has been damaging in the past, it may take a change to the workflow, i.e. client notes remain hidden until a manager/supervisor has reviewed them.


1

Here is a completely different approach then mentioned so far. If we consider the idea that notes to the user submitting them are always the same thing, so it's a matter of where they are submitting to. Here is an example from popular agile program JIRA When writing a comment on the side of the submit button is a "target audience" drop down, set by the ...


1

Use fundamental design principles to create visual distinction between the elements. Using color, layout, typography, and scale, you can indicate to the user on a fundamental level that there are two different kinds of notes. Most of the other commenters have stressed one of these concepts (layout), but have not addressed the other design fundamentals in ...


1

What about changing the text in the "Save" button to "Save Public" and "Save Private" respectively (or something similar). If you want to make it even clearer give them different colours. After a while your users would associate the colours with private/public messages.


1

Are notes to clients also shown internally to other staff? Do notes to clients have the same structure and info as notes used internally? If so, on the compose message screen, consider using a simple checkbox immediately before the "Post" button that say: [ ] Make this note available to client [Post Note] cancel On the table you have, consider combining ...


1

Both are valid, which is why both are in practice. However, when it comes to the question of mobile, sending a code may work best, the reason being that in order to access the internet on a mobile, you will likely be using a smartphone or similar relatively sophisticated device. When you are sent a message on such a device one of two things typically ...



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