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26

A button performs an action. E.g. Save, delete, register, submit. A link connects you to resource. E.g. a URL or a file. Think of buttons as verbs and links as nouns. That said, there are also other distinctions. Often a link is used where you would have a button, but where you want to de-emphasise the action. Often for secondary options or high risk ...


7

Have a look at http://www.tchibo.de/. When you scroll down something similar is used; it's called a visual scrollbar or preview scrollbar. It shows the position of the main window content on a thumbnail of the very long page content. Is this what you are looking for?


6

A component is a tool, in this case it's a piece of software. Many components and their relationships make a system. A feature is some functionality, that is what the tool does. E.g., "My system has a share-to component; it's written in python. Its features include sharing to personbook and whistler." Typically, you can install a component, as it's a ...


5

This question is quite broad, so I'll try and give a primer. The Graph Drawing entry in Wikipedia makes a good starting point for this genre of visualizations. Graph Drawing is a general term for pictures that show how things are connected. Synonyms and more specific variants abound: Node-Link Diagram, Relationship Diagram, Network Diagram, Social ...


4

If it as an internal website, then 'yes' display an error, something like the following: Data is currently unavailable; Currently unavailable; No data available, error 1234 Even follow it with an error code that you and your team will recognize, so if someone in the company reports it to you or another of your team, then you'll know exactly what it means ...


3

There are no specific rules for buttons v/s links. By definition, links should be used as navigational elements that would take the user to other pages of the site/app/product. Whereas buttons should be used to perform certain specific actions even though that action is performed on other pages. But in practice links are often used to de-emphasize ...


2

Keep it simple and make sure your error message and presentation denote the severity and context of the error. Take responsibility: Here's a great error message I noticed on Twitter yesterday: Also note the Twitter error message is dismissable and pretty small. If no user action is required consider moving the error message over the pane/content the error ...


2

If people are expecting to see a component that can't be rendered, you should tell them something. What you should display, and how, depends on the audience, severity and the context of the app. The graphic design should be roughly commensurate with the severity of the error - in this case, somewhat important. Visual "loudness" is relative to the context, ...


2

Based on your description, it's an abstraction of a Magnifying glass. The abstract content is small (whether or not its shown on the viewport) and the viewport is used in such a way as to give the user a sense that they're seeing an enlarged version of the content in much the same way that a pop-in of an enlarged image can be used over a thumbnail to give a ...


2

As I said in my comment: I'm not sure if I've seen such a visualization before... The closes concept I can think of, is "linking lines" and "synchronization links" used in various comparison tools. Screenshot from Araxis Merge:


2

I am not aware of a single place where you can look up ui components for any platform. Similar components are sometimes called differently based on a platform. Therefore it might be helpful to refer to the UX documentations for a specific platform: iOS (unofficial but nicely organized) ...


2

They referred to as "button groups" in bootstrap: http://twitter.github.com/bootstrap/components.html In the Android ICS you would probably use tabs to switch views: http://developer.android.com/design/building-blocks/tabs.html


2

Simply based on the information in the link you provided, I think the answer is "the sooner the better". Maybe it's something that's decided upon before realizing changes need to be made. i.e.: making the entire company's website more user-friendly > Finding out the shopping cart isn't user-friendly at all and deciding something should be done. If done ...


1

If Mr. X ask about an object Y, What Y is made of --> it's components ... What Y can do --> it's features ... for example, take Microsoft Office, Components: Microsoft Word again, it's components: spell-checker, Page designer, Word art etc. Excel it's components: formula editor, Graph editor, Diagram etc. But, features ? Microsoft Word ...


1

To my knowledge this would be called a "Long rectangular scrollbar" or a "Conventional scrollbar". This pattern has been around since the begining of GUI (Beware! This is the opinion of the writer, not a fact). It first saw daylight in 1984 (Steve Jobs introduction of Macintosh) if I remember correct. References: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrollbar ...


1

I think the "network" view would be a good visualizaton tool. You can easily see how things are related a la alternative to a site map above. You could also change the node size depending on amount of content or visits. However this is a great visualizaton idea for presentations or even small amount of links, it might get unwieldly for large scenarios. It ...



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