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11

You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


7

Try Recommending instead of showing equal choices. The paradox of choice is a funny thing. You can give someone so many options that they no longer have any options at all. There are plenty of psychological studies that show how paralyzing too many choices can be. Presenting tons of options can be a barrier to entry. In order to combat such analysis ...


5

When you show the two larger circles with the players being compared, you could simply have some sort of selector below each one with the year. That way you're only bothering with the year for the selected players and it doesn't complicate your interface too much. There are many options for the year / season selectors: dropdowns a simple list of ...


3

I would reduce the information and show the user a window per attribute, but only attributes, where the value will change: When the user clicks on 'Discard' or 'Apply Changes' the next attribute will be shown until all attributes are merged. Update: If you do not want to use one window per attribute, I want to suggest you to list all changes and work ...


2

Here is my implementation of a solution. (watch video) I'm not arguing as much as Evil Closet Monkey did and I will certainly tell again many things he already told, but it should probably look like this if it was an iOS app with modern/flat design. At beginning, only the search field is shown, no ambiguity. When the field is filled, the second shows ...


2

Whatever your constraints, stick to conventions where possible. Check out Nielsen's 10 Heuristics for good rules of thumb. If an element is not editable, it should appear disabled or inactive. Help the user by explaining why something is locked with an alert. Set the users' expectations and afford them clues as to what is going on. Tabs are used as a ...


2

The solution I've seen is to not use a fixed grid, but a set of fields as required. Each condition has its own row, containing the necessary fields. Since every operator needs one value, one value field is always visible. When the user selects "between", a second field is added for this row only. I have no specific testing results supporting or ...


1

If I got you right, what you are looking for is an Identicon. It is similar to the text based representation you mentioned, and it's widely used on the web (take Stack Exchange for example). Here is an example:


1

Alternate approaches:- 1) You can think of showing summary of changes in a popup confirm dialog, when user click 'Submit' button. 2) Or mark modified fields(background color or border color), and show old value during mouseover in a tooltip. Above approaches satisfies both requirements :- 1) Uncluttered Modify UI without third column to show previous ...


1

I would just suggest a higher resolution display because frankly that's the easiest way to do it. 2560x1600/2560x1440 are generally 27" or bigger and aren't cramped like 4K monitors, and you can get high-quality displays for $250+. Assuming cost is an option, it's also possible to set each tab as an individual window and set each to 1230px (since that ...


1

Well, you can still have one button that says "Proceed". So a label must be placed somewhere saying that if you complete only one textbox a search will be performed and if both textboxes are completed then a comparison will take place.


1

This suggestion is probably a bit unconventional. But well, at least I had fun making it. edit: Sorry @JonW. Didn't know that. I will elaborate below and look into the mockup-tool, it looks nice. So what I did, is to make the button interactive. When the user wants to search, he just fills in Product A en clicks the button 'Search'. But when the user wants ...


1

Try to avoid different modes for the same button. A call-to-action should perform the same action each time and should not change its behaviour at all. Rather use two different buttons. You could enable/disable the buttons depending on the user input, but don't forget to add a hint why they're disabled then. E.g. "Please select two products to compare" ...


1

The only responsive industry solution i've met is http://www.samsung.com/nl/consumer/tv-audio-video/televisions/ . With a few adjustments it might even work nicely on the smallest viewports. Just take into account not to use too many products for comparison.



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