Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

46

This is not as simple as it may seem, and although your instinct may be to ban someone, you should first consider the following: How do you determine what is offensive or not? There are many surnames (last names or family names) that would be considered swear words in English, let alone some other cultures. So you run the very real risk of banning ...


23

It currently accounts for about 20% of the activity on the site. The fact that 20% of the activity on your site is private messaging indicates that your users consider private messaging to be of high value. So, you should be hesitant to remove it. Even if private messaging is not directly of benefit to your community, it still provides increased ...


17

First, as others said, people want to see that it'll be worth it before they register. That means (1) let them use the site in some reduced form (like it sounds like you're doing, and like StackExchange does for instance), and (2) communicate benefits that matter to them. For an image-storing site, it seems like being able to manage your images/albums ...


17

Users never really want to register, that's the first thing; registration places a barrier between them and a 'goal'. If you are going to make users register, make it as painless as possible; e.g. login with Facebook or other common service providers, and make sure you explain clearly why users should register, e.g. for benefits, rewards, etc.; I really ...


17

To me, this is all about alternatives, providing the "value menu" of things most people would want to say in a tiny comment, in one click. Provided you have made the alternatives, e.g. "click the +1/awesome/like button!" discoverable and easy, I favor a blocking message like: We prefer that comments be longer than 15 characters so they add ...


16

Hopefully my experience will be of some help, although it does involve social media. I used to work for a large music venue, we had a huge cinematic display screen and one of the interaction ideas we came up with was to get users to submit comments to Twitter using a particular hash-tag. The inevitable concerns were realised. How do you stop profanity, ...


13

There are many valid reasons to limit username format. Uniqueness. If you allow multiple character sets, you can end up with names that look exactly the same, but are technically different. For example, many Cyrillic script characters look exactly the same as Latin characters but are in fact different. "Нarry" and "Harry" aren't the same word, even ...


12

I always like thumbs up/down, especially when you can plot it on a timeline. However it could offer more depth. Have you considered offering a limited selection of emotions? How are you feeling? Music is intended to be evocative and the artist will want the audience to feel. The only bad emotion is bordom, generally indicating a lack of effect. Even anger ...


11

You need to distinguish between levels of negative behaviour and respond accordingly. Spammers Spammers or people posting clearly abusive content should be permanently banned without any warning. It is also useful if your site requires users to achieve some level reputation before they can do something to spam other users. This should be something that ...


10

I'm willing to bet that you are more concerned with users not getting their desired nickname than the user will ever be. Right now, users have no reason to care what their nickname is on your site because it doesn't show up anywhere on your site. Because of this, I recommend not pestering your users with any obtrusive process or notification (especially a ...


10

A lot depends on the purpose of the voting, but the general rules that I would follow are: Show the votes before voting: the primary purpose of the voting is the sorting the posts / options you are allowed to vote on more than one post / option there are potentially many posts / options and you don’t need someone to have read them all before they vote ...


9

Well...is it a problem? I forget where I heard this, but there's a story about how everyone assumes those "no dogs" signs are just put up in stores just because they've always been there, it's convention. But really, those signs get put up because someone brought a dog, and it caused problems. To avoid further problems, they banned dogs. Now, maybe they ...


9

Have you considered offering a recommended limit? For instance, if a comment is less than say, 15 characters, upon submitting the comment the user is presented with an alert suggesting that they elaborate on their comment. This will make the user consider the value of their comment, and will hopefully trigger the action of adding more substance. Always give ...


9

One way to filter out the bad apples might be take advantage of the disparity in motivation between fans and trolls. Get users to register (using their real identity?) for some kind of "fan club" closed community before they can comment. The effort of registering and giving up some anonymity would increase the effort (and risk) for trolls and so decrease ...


8

The notion of blocking users is inherently thorny, and is often resolved in the way that presents the least potential for social friction possible. Consider the use case in which one individual is being pestered by another, and wishes they could continue using the service as though the offending party didn't exist. They don't want a confrontation, they just ...


7

I work at a reviews software company, and we've found that it's a matter of authenticity. User profiles, avatars, number of votes, comments, etc, are all indicators that real users are contributing. If the brand says, "we like this review!" it's probably because it's positive. Users don't want to trust marketing copy or advertising, and if user generated ...


7

One of the simplest methods that I have seen for this is to assign every user a nickname based on their UserID. So one may be "user157" and another "user18" etc. Of course most people won't like these names, which is the incentive to get them to change them. It would also help to send everyone an email letting them know that this is the case and that ...


6

Show the result after the vote has been cast. This has to do with conformity (as you briefly mention yourself). Experiments (see f.ex. Asch's experiment) has shown that people in general, are affected by what other people do and say in groups, even if they initially was thinking or knowing differently. Therefor, showing a result before the vote is cast may ...


6

There are two different issues at hand here. The first is whether you a private message system is needed, and the second is whether you can reasonably remove one that already exists. Depending on the site, private messaging can be a huge administration nightmare. People sending spam, privacy concerns if you can read the spam to know when to remove it, ...


5

Users are more likely to trust a site and a product if there are signs of activity surrounding both. The numbers, for various reasons, help to create that sense of trust. Two random additional thoughts: At the product level. If you run your eye over an Amazon product page, you can quickly get an idea whether the comments thread is active or not. When ...


5

Any star rating on a public facing website that doesn't limit it to one vote per person, is essentially meaningless. If you want it to mean anything, you need to restrict it to signed in users. Anything else that you do may look like a rating, but will really offer none of the benefits of a rating. If there isn't some business reason that you want people ...


5

Short answer: No There are users who like obscenity and vulgarism, there are those who don't. Generally those kinds of people don't like to mix, and will always try to segregate into separate groups. If you ban offensive names (which is not that easy from technical standpoint), you remove one of the flags those people use to distinguish themselves. However ...


4

1) Technically, limiting post size should be pretty easy. 2) Having places to put: format of idea -> problem -> research -> solution chosen + why can't be that hard. The entries are fairly sequential. 3) Promote moderators. Before you decide to get too rigid, keep in mind, that your initial ideas for this site will probably not last. You'll ...


4

Take a look at this fantastic animation about the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation:


4

It depends on the service and your expected user base. Deciding between blocking and allowing potentially offensive usernames is fairly easy. The more difficult decision is where exactly you draw the line. You are making a tradeoff. You are disallowing some users from doing something they'd like to do (use a vulgar/offensive name) in order to create a more ...


4

The best solution is for a site to have "safety" levels. By default, content created by users who are identified as offensive is completely hidden from view. You don't see their questions, answers, comments or accounts at all, unless you switch to unsafe mode. When you switch to unsafe mode for the first time, you have to acknowledge a dialog that you're ...


4

Creating a white-list of allowed characters is easier than creating a black-list of all characters that might cause problems, such as code injection due to poor handling of strings.


3

users do not want to register for fear of being spammed or their email sold to others. And, the time, even 14 seconds is too long if I am just trying to get an image.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible