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The final word on confirmation dialogs is given in the article Never use a warning when you mean undo by Aza Raskin on A List Apart. Here's the key idea: People habituate: they press 'yes' without thinking, because 99% of the time that's what they want. The confirmation dialog isn't effective at asking for the required attention. People shouldn't have to ...


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I like your design, but in my opinion it seems a little dangerous to place an invitation to delete content above the content itself. There are exceptions to this rule but generally I think it would be safer to place it beneath. Further to Brendon's answer, I think you could condense this further to just the one button: the word "Delete", with the trash icon ...


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The major issue here is I don't know how to answer the question about deletion. You've asked the question in plain English, but I assume you are expecting me to answer in symbolic form. Do I click the 'trash symbol' to delete the message? It would be much clearer if the symbol was appended with the words "Yes, delete this comment". How do I cancel? There's ...


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This is a content strategy issue. The question is: what is that content? On a lot of media sites, the comments are horrific content. Typically argumentative, factually suspect, poorly written, and for the most part, damage the actual content on the page rather than enhance it. In many cases, the comments aren't there to enhance the content in any way. ...


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It can be a very good idea as long as you don't consider your comments to be a very relevant part of the content. In your example the second news block is centered, which feels weird and breaks the reading flow. I think a news feed needs to be quickly scannable when you scroll through it. So keeping the Comments Block even if it's empty would keep a ...


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Usually I would say that mono column is the best but in this precise situation, adding comments on the right is smart, this way the user can read without scrolling up/down to understand what people are talking about ! :) One question : what happens when you have more than 7 comments? can you scroll thru the comments? EDIT : Comments column -> comments ...


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I agree this is a tricky one, there's no easy way around it. One of the more popular comment services these days is Disqus - their comments are responsive. It's not perfect, really only handles up to about four levels of indentation. Example. The other option, if you think you are going to get more and more levels of replies like this would be to just ...


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Wall O' Text - It's a wall! Typically, comments are ordered chronologically, top to bottom, with latest at the bottom (Facebook comments, Twitter conversations, StackExchange comments etc.). Now if a wall of text exists, like 10-20 scrolls long, who would want to continue down and find the rest? We're not talking about the UX of the writer, we're talking ...


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Many, Many more people read a comment then write it. It costs more to read a comment if it is longer. It takes someone longer to condense their thoughts into a short space. So by having short comments we put the cost on the writer, rather than every reader.


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It is not bad UX, it is good UX exactly for the reasons you listed. The site has some business reason to not want to have long comments. It doesn't matter what their reason is. They don't want them, and they know that they can't make the system so watertight so the users won't ever do it. So what they do is a very good UX. They 1) make it clear to the ...



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