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32

What is the context of the question the user is answering, and what are the implications? This is the important question that helps guide the appropriateness of "Y" vs. "YES" (or "N" vs. "NO"). In this case you are dealing with a RSA certificate, which is a big deal. Accepting a certificate you don't mean to can have serious implications, so it is important ...


8

Yes, "mysqld --help --verbose" already exists to get more details on help. I would use "-- help --verbose" or "-help -verbose", this would at least be familiar to mysqld users


4

I would go with alphabetical ordering, even if I instinctively disliked it. When considering ease of use, think of the experience for a beginning user and an advanced user. A beginning user may not know what the name of a command is that they are looking for, so they'll just scan the list anyway, no matter the order. Alphabetical ordering won't slow down the ...


4

This might not be applicable in your case, but I've seen solutions where typing a command line command without parameters will bring up a short help or reference, and typing the command -help brings up the actual help. For example see screenshots below, from the cli for yeoman: Typing without parameters (yo) brings up (an interactive) help dialogue: And ...


3

Generally, I've understood this to mean that Y is the default, and if I hit something other than a Y or an N (such as hitting the spacebar, Enter, or even Q), it will use the Y option. You are correct that this implies that Y is the default, on pressing the Enter key. An input other then Y, N or Enter would generally product an error. Is this ...


3

Part of the commonly held belief by technical people is that not having an echo of * makes the password more secure as anyone watching over your shoulder is not aware of the password length - which they would be if they saw the number of * characters. So whether or not the original reasoning were security, the fact that most users perceive not having an ...


3

There are various way to improve the retro CLI feeling of your web app. Here are a few: 1) Block cursor I would add a block cursor that very slowly blinks, like: 2) Scan lines Scan lines are cool, period. 3) Sound Although it should absolutely be optional and be done really well, sound can really enhance the experience. You could go for the ...


2

Heavy use of CLI applications can improve recall, and can even develop muscle memories so that folks like UNIX operators can execute commands without thinking about the text they are typing. As a programmer, I experience this, and I many others who do also. For example, when naviagting folders on a remote server, I think the words "Go Up", but my fingers ...


2

I assume that this HAS to be a command line interface? Then first off: Why both "add" and "bookmark"? You should construct the commands with a verb/action as the first part. That is either: >bookmark entityX or >addBookmark entityX Then the trick is to find som memorable identifier. If you've ever tried using the filesystem on unix you will know ...


2

The pattern I have observed in CLIs that I use on a regular basis (Unix/Cygwin, perforce, ant, etc) is: "sub-commands" go first, required arguments go on the command line as-is; optional args go with option flags. For example: cp file-1 file-2 Both files are required arguments. ls -als There are no required args, but three options that ...


2

Your word order is pretty good, it's generally a good idea to keep to a familiar "sentence structure" like format, especially if you want a natural-language like search. Keeping similar to how the familiar CLIs (DOS and Unix) work is important too. Unix Standards are pretty much the standard for CLI applications and I wouldn't stray far from their model. ...


2

In my experience -h -v would be a confusing way to spell this. (Or --help --verbose, which is the same thing written in longopts format.) Three other ways: Some commands provide a quick summary of help if run without any options, with -h/--help providing longer help. If your command does something useful even without options, this might not work. Some ...


2

A Common Approach The most common way of drilling-down to see less frequently used options or greater details in --help messages seems to be appending to '--help' as the following sample options illustrate... command [--OPTION...] Does something useful in an intuitive way. Options: --quiet (-q) Execute command with no feedback. ...


2

I would also try to get the feeling of the curved screen, if possible, since that was the way thing looked back in the 1980s' when I learned programming. Also make sure that users can't save their work but must put their programs on paper and when coming back to the site - they need to put everything in the computer again.


2

I don't mean to offend, but it sounds to me like you might be going at it the wrong way. You've already done some testing and put your finger on the problem: "it tends to confuse people who are looking for a traditional browsing experience." That you've come that far is great. Now it seems you've decided the design is fine, but the users' expectations ...


1

Any chance for doing what Notepad++ does by telling a column number in the footer of the window? My cursor is in front of "command" and at the bottom you can see "Col: 18"


1

A more generic answer to this question might be that we are dealing with two different design considerations here: Firstly, we are talking about whether the question is more important than the answer, or if both should be designed to ensure maximum comprehension by the user. It seems like if the question is worded well it isn't enough to prevent the user ...


1

The way I think of it is that paper (or a Kindle) reflects ambient light, while a screen is itself a light source. With a surface that reflects light, you want that surface as bright as possible, to give you more contrast. If the printed page were black, with little white lines, the reflected light would be insubstantial and therefore difficult to ...


1

Provide only a single "version" of help. Put a short summary at the begining, and put the full details under it. If the short version is enough, then no scrolling is required. If it is not enough your users don't have to go looking someplace else, they just scrol down to it.


1

What is at issue is the use of the colon. In a text message, it's assumed that the sentence is a real sentence and does not contain jargon (or punctuation which is jargon-like). Colons introduce a result which is described by the introduction at the start of the line (rather like this sentence itself): Trains to Jonesville run at: 1053, 1153 and 1253 ...


1

I agree with Alex Ovtcharenko's answer, with one amendment: why not make these terse command line options the synonyms for old-school switches: prog import Proj1 MyHub would be equivalent to: prog import --Project:Proj1 --Hub:MyHub or shortened: prog import -p:Proj1 -h:MyHub That way, it can be as unambiguous as the user desires.


1

In sense of cognitive processes it is good to use first the objects of manipulation, because they are primary ones, and at the second — the context of activity. It seems, that projects are primary objects in your commands, and hub in some extent is just a property of the project (the hub itself is not the primary artefact of your application's goals). So ...


1

Unless you're going to actually write the entire sentence, you can't rely on the language to clarify the directionality of your command. Like you already found out, a sentence could be constructed to support either direction. In stead, the directionality we're used to in the left-to-right part of the world is much stronger. If the command will move data ...


1

I would say this post offers a good rational as to why many/most command line programs don't echo. To summarize, it is normally much easier to disable echo, than replace the text, with command line programs.


1

One feature I really liked in CLIs was called command recall or something that was on VAX/VMS systems: When you hit the up-arrow button the previously executed command is recalled. It is not executed, the text line is redisplayed and it can be edited or an will execute it. Hitting up-arrow again takes you back to earlier commands, and down-arrow takes you ...


1

Applications in that time period were not command-line oriented as far as I know. You're saying "library terminal", so I guess you mean VAX/VMS and SystemV / BSD apps of the age. Look at old BBS screenshots (Bulletin-Board System), old 80s actual library management systems, like Dynix which was one of the most widespread as Wikipedia suggests, AS/400 apps ...


1

I don't think you need any unicode characters to draw the board itself. One of the main characteristics of a chess board is the black & white pattern, right? You should add that pattern as a background instead of those lines. Especially those vertical lines makes the picture a mess.


1

I think the best way to approach this is to do the following Give examples of how to call your command line tool List the parameter inputs Explain what the parameters mean DateCalculator.exe [time1] [time2] [format|opt] time1 - The first date you want to compare time2 - The second date you want to compare format - List all of the different formats ...


1

It seems to me that CLI systems have been doing similar things for years: 1) help (cmd) and 2) (cmd) /? have both been used in OS like DOS and VMS. Asking (presumably novice) users to learn a new command to get help seems counter-intuitive. While not as pretty as your solution, those systems have been effective in providing help. Unless your command line ...



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