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5

Try using a modified version of the first one, perhaps like so: What this essentially is is the first one, but with a box above to give an elegant preview of what you are currently pointing at. It will be above the user's fingers, and therefore out of their way. The reason I chose the first slider is because it has a bar, which is definitely the best way ...


1

I think based on the naming scheme for the themes that it might be more of a semi-random convention rather than anything else. In fact, I think you'll find it very difficult to stick to the convention and expanding on it simply because of the ambiguity in the naming scheme. If you examine it more closely: light: could be referring to colour or weight, so ...


1

There are many different color-semantic mapping schemes, but most have some basis in color theory. Color theory is quite expansive so an explanation of how specific colors are matched to meaning is probably not suitable for UX.SE. Fortunately there are a lot of resources available to help you work through this. The term you want to look up is "color ...


3

Meanings of colors vary by culture. Of course, a few colors have similiar meanings everywhere, for example gold stands for sucess and high quality in most cultures. On the other hand in the U.S. white signifies purity and is used at weddings, but in other cultures white is color used for death and funerals. It's very likely that the authors used meanings of ...


4

Reduce cognitive friction by limiting the number of choices There are almost 17 million possible hex color combinations and limiting this to just a few options will reduce the cognitive load on the end user. I find traditional colour wheels really unintuitive for common colours ... I feel the same way. Traditional color wheels can be overwhelming so ...


0

Color picking is a common design pattern. There is no "ideal" widget here... ...because the right solution will depend on the needs of your application: How precisely you need users to be able to select a color (a professional designer may need #hex or rgb() interfaces for precise selection, a consumer will not necessarily understand a traditional color ...


3

I happen to disagree with the other suggested answers, so let me try to explain why. Appropriateness Is the use of your app in dark environments a core feature of the application? For example this is the case for an e-reader application or navigation application, but is not the case for a messaging application. If it is a core feature then I agree that ...


0

I've found the CIELab color space, and its transformation CIELCH, feel far more natural. The "L" dimension corresponds to lightness and that fits nicely into a user's mental model of color. Unfortunately we couldn't find a color picker out there based on these color spaces, so we built our own little color picker (warning, shameless self-plug). Here is the ...


29

A good example to consider would be the ibooks app in iOS which allows users to enable the dark theme automatically depending on the light sensor detection. However as PS86 rightly pointed out, dont build this automatically into the system but enable the user to set as a desired parameter. To quote this article, the ibook app enables this by an option ...


6

Yes, it's a good idea to dynamically change the theming of the application based on lighting. Also remember to add: the ability for the user to turn off dynamically changing the theme based on lighting The ability to change theme regardless of the current lighting ambience Sometimes users prefer having dark theme during the day and vice versa


3

Put it in a grid 3x3 below. It will be much easier to handle - you will shorten the distance. Take a look at photoshop swatches for order. Also consider names for colors on roll over / title="red" - 10% of males are color-blind.


0

I would say option A(or B). It's a good visualization of which colors is available and that it's connected to the color selected by the user. The mouse movement for selecting another color is way better for this option compared to for example option C or D. Moving the mouse straight to the right(preferred by me as a right handed person) or to the left is ...


0

As some of the comments have already discussed, it's more important that there is consistency throughout the application for all buttons. The user's response will come from a change in hue regardless of whether you choose to illuminate the button or shade it. To answer your direct question: For the reasons above, I don't believe that either way is ...


0

Illuminated on Hover is Likey More Intuitive You make a great point about the physical metaphor to a shadow cast over a button, but many interfaces have standardized a depressed button appearance to be a darker button with a small shadow cast by the button's "container". A dark hover state that transitions to a dark depressed button state would not ...



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