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12

Highlighting is more relative than absolute Non-designers often don't realize that the style of highlighting is much less important than the relationship between the highlights and non-highlights. There are all kinds of approaches to creating highlights. One might use font-color, background-color, size, font variation (e.g. italics, underlining) and ...


3

Use bold and italics to emphasize and colour to embody a feeling. When deciding when to use bold-italics-colour I tend to wield following guidelines: Emphasis, general: limit the use of bold and italics to the strict minimum as the added attention demand raises the cognitive load. If everything is emphasized, nothing is emphasized. Bold or italics. Always ...


5

First and foremost; highlighting text should be used sparsely. Otherwise it gets to be noise making it hard for the user to get what you’re trying to communicate. Christian Holst who wrote the article Scannability: How to Highlight Text on the Web says 10% highlighting is the maximum, but I think that’s pushing the limit. Here “less is more” applies. ...


0

I would avoid an omious black on a big button that will inevitably take money out of your pocket based entirely on your desisions to that point. I also feel like the right window's scheme works a little better based on this thought and that yellow works well with big buttons; black and white, not so much.


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Besides anything, take a look to the "Which Color Converts the Best?" article and then How To Design Call to Action Buttons That Convert. Just in case you don't want to read them, the absolute answer is "could be anything". In your specific case, yellow is quite possibly the best choice because of contrasting and disruption of the palette, but you'll need to ...


1

Since the only color added would be to the call to action I would certainly suggest using the yellow button. why? Color is very important when trying to create emphasis. I wrote a post on my blog that recommended you let your hyperlinks shine. Well, your call-to-action buttons should shine even brighter. After all, if you’re using them correctly, these ...


0

Snook colour contrast checker You can test foreground and background colour combinations with the Snook colour contrast checker. http://snook.ca/technical/colour_contrast/colour.html It gives you various results including whether the contrast passes various WCAG compliances. Example results: N.b. This is recommended by the BBC for their designers to ...


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Please use http://contrastchecker.com/ to check if the color combiantion of foreground(text) and background passes the WCAG criteria. Website lists 6 criteria for which you can check your combinations.


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The attribute you are looking for is “relative luminance,” L, which, for a standard monitor, can be calculated as: L = 0.2126 * Rg + 0.7152 * Gg + 0.0722 * Bg, Where Rg, Gg and Bg are R, G, B values transformed as follows: if R <= 10 then Rg = R/3294, else Rg = (R/269 + 0.0513)^2.4 if G <= 10 then Gg = G/3294, else Gg = (G/269 + ...


3

According to the WCAG 2.0 web accessibility standards, the contrast for a text and background color should be a ratio of at least 4.5:1. Their checker shows your current background colors as being too light. I have taken screenshots of the differences: There is not enough contrast between the background color and the text. If the eye has to ...


2

If you want to check the readability of text in contrast to the background use the following link - webaim.org/resources/contrastchecker It will allow you to easily identify whether there is enough contrast between the text and background to determine if people with visual impairments can read the text. It also helps with meeting Level AA (or AAA) ...


3

I think you're a bit confused here. HSL stands for Hue, Saturation, Lightness. If you need to know white= 100% Lightness. So the opposite to white is still L, only that at 0% (thus if you use any value for H and S, then add 0% for the L value, you'll get black). You can see the w3 recommendations with examples here As for HSV, it's a bit more complex, ...


2

Well, since you ask for it, here you have a very complete study with examples and a lot of data, another very conceptual study on what they call data hallucination , reference on Circadian clock. Keep in mind this is very technical information, and while very useful, maybe a bit overkill for your needs. Also, there's something that is not being considered ...


3

F.lux has some information that may be relevant to this situation. F.lux is a software that overlays your desktop screen and adjusts colors depending on the time of day to make it easier on the eyes. f.lux research Blue Light Affects Sleep (and here's why) We know that night-time exposure to blue light keeps people up late. We believe that f.lux ...


3

The calm/easy colors that normal convention dictates isn't just there because they are a bland and boring app, it it because those colors have been tried and tested to allow users to look at the screen and use the app long without eye irritation and usability issues. It is a trend now for entertainment focused apps to use more bold colors to attract users ...


3

From an accessibility point of view regarding the styling of visited links, the following links are good to read up on: http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-UAAG20-Reference-20140925/#sc_131 http://webaim.org/blog/wcag-2-0-and-link-colors/ Both provide good examples as to why it's important to style visited links differently. The first link is a direct ...


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There are plenty of sources online about visited link color, but one credible source is Nielsen Norman Group. Both Jakob Nielsen and Donald Norman have each spent more than 20 years researching user behavior and user experience. They say: People get lost and move in circles when websites use the same link color for visited and new destinations. To ...


1

Most brands choose a specific color for branding and stick with it. There is no general answer to why the specific color was chosen by what company. But in general, it seems to be a good idea for a brand to choose a color that is associated with it. In general, choosing a brand color helps building brand recognition. As you correctly stated, the colors of ...



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