Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Colors should really match the theme of the site and be easy to the eye. For example, if the site is about valentines day, use shades of red and pink. Most importantly, make sure contrast is good. An example of bad contrast which many websites produce is light grey on white. Visit the URL shown below and put any URL in it to see if the website has good ...


2

If I understand the question properly then the answer falls into many different areas. You should be well read on the subject but I would recommend looking into a range of articles from the Gestalt School to Tufte to Nielsen to computer scientists looking into color and data visualization (as for example): Why Should Engineers and Scientists Be Worried ...


0

For the white train, you can outline the circle with gray (the circle itself would have white filling) and then your train would be outlined in gray. This way, you get your white background and the train is still visible. For black train lines, you can have the background circle black, with a white train.


0

The best way is to use black text on white background. Avoid using any background color. DO one experiment on your own. Paste a 2000 word article on white background vs some other color and give it to your friends and family for reading and observe their expressions.


0

You could: change up the color scheme of your foreground text so you don't have both black and white have a background pattern that tastefully change color behind the different foreground text colors (you would need to make sure the placement works with different screen sizes and this would probably get quite complicated) Also, suggest I checking out ...


3

Material design is, to my recollection, silent on this matter of header/footer matching. The documentation shows several variants: no footer, matching header and footer, different header and footer. The header may or may not be considered a "large area"...it really depends on your layout: material design contains examples of both large headers and narrow ...


2

Smashing Magazine did a huge article in October 2014 on best practices in color accessibility design. It covers the forms of color blindness and a number of tools to validate your designs. Here's a copy of the best practices outlined there: Test for color-contrast ratio, and document the styles and color codes used for all design elements. Create a ...


1

Samsung screens use differently shaped pixels than your iPhone. This is actually not a color calibration issue. It's called a PenTile screen and the main difference is that the red, green, and blue subpixels aren't the same as a normal display. Basically, instead of each pixel getting a red, green, and blue subpixel that are the same size, a PenTile pixel ...


0

Different computer screens, operating systems, and even different web browsers have different color characteristics, so it’s just about impossible to get a given color to look the same on every screen. You can get much more consistent results by calibrating your display, but this will only improve your situation — the colors that others see will still be ...


0

Speaking from personal experience, you'll be hard-pressed to find a black/blue combination that is readable. Any alertness benefit will come from the user struggling to make out what the text says -- and that's likely to increase user fatigue, not increase alertness.


0

I will say I can't tell the active state by the contrast of yellow and white. Maybe add some shadow/darker border to indicate a pressed button. If use the visual indicator as a states indicator, keep in mind the visual style should be consistent with the rest of the pages. Different visual styles will confuse users.


3

Every screen has its own way of displaying colours. That's where colour calibration comes in to play. For example, my iMac displays the green image differently to the external monitor (EIZO) attached to it. That doesn't make any colour "right" or "wrong" - it's all down to the monitor's reproduction. Equally, it's been suggested that humans perceive ...


1

The colors, although helpful, are not that important. I would use full-blue (That is, #0000FF, or rgb 000,000,255), but mainly focus on a font that is not distracting, and is easy to read (Don't be using exo on a text editor), and make it easily readable (Within a size of 12-14em). This will ensure the user will have the most focused workspace, allowing them ...


1

I kind of feel like if you have to ask, then you should be doing more to visually indicate which buttons are active than just using color. Google has some good guidelines along these lines: http://www.google.com/design/spec/components/buttons.html#


2

Well, I think there are a few factors that need to be considered. What does the rest of your layout look like? What colors are you using? Where are these buttons placed? All of those things (and more) will come into play when your users are trying to determine whether the button is active. My suggestion would to do some AB testing with your potential users. ...


-2

After finding a quantity of old black and white family negatives I photographed them using my mobile phone ( Samsung S3 ) Negatives were placed on an illuminated light box. Then through screen colour reversal I can view as a positive They can also be displayed on my laptop by using the same procedure. Although I have found this useful for this purpose I ...


0

The reason inverted color setting exist is for people with low visablility or that are considered blind but can still see… hope this helps See Microsoft's Accessibility Documentations


1

As a general rule, you should avoid presenting users with lots of fields at once (all on one screen). It is daunting for a user to be faced with this (unless they are a call centre data entry employee or similar). You need to break the form up into small, manageable tasks that are presented in a logical order. When you break up the form there will be less ...


0

Grey out the fields that do not require any input. Keeps the others in simple white color. For mandatory fields, you can put a small star besides the field The third point depends on the type of data, If some kind of big text is required you can open a separate textbox on clicking the field.



Top 50 recent answers are included