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I might not fully understand your reference to primary/secondary actions but it seems like the users were comfortable with the original color scheme so stick with it. In case you don't already do this I would suggest having a common layout for your action buttons. For instance... With Accept, Refuse, and Correct, a horizontal layout of Refuse, Correct, ...


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There are significant accessibility concerns in just using colors as visual indicators for users as colorblind users might struggle to differentiate different colors from one another making the app useless to them. To quote the WCAG guidelines Ensure that text and graphics are understandable when viewed without color. If color alone is used to ...


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As @laurendankiewicz proposed, you can use outlined icon, like pictured: But I think you also need to consider: You shouldn't use color code as the only mean to convey information for accessibility reasons. You could use tools like NoCoffee vision simulator to assess it If the color of the line is important information for a user, it's better to ...


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I’m not a programmer, but I’m interested in this topic. As I know (as an app user), Invert Colors in iOS device is to make the digital screen comfortable to look at and ease the eyestrain. The usage of Invert Colors in iOS is the same as F.lux in Windows/Mac computer, Twilight (a free app) in Android phone. Since Apple has lots of limits for approving an app ...


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Consistency First, let's define consistency (within desgin context): Things that share similar semantics should be presented or act in a similar way. And its misuse Now consistency is one of the most often misused concepts in design, for two reasons: Designers adhere to the guideline ignoring the actual problem at hand. In other words, the ...


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My general answer is consistency; Consistency can prevent user confusion and not make the user think. Muscle memory will remember where the buttons are. However - is there a reason why your users would expect the buttons to change? Is it something they might expect? Why not try a lowfi prototype and see how your users respond - you should have an answer ...


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Great question Mattias. I think you should lean toward consistency. In recent usability testing on our site we found that everyone accomplishes tasks differently and in a trial-by-error fashion. Consistency from page to page helped our users maintain a sense of clarity and made things appear more intuitive, even if it was an action they never performed on ...


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In principle it can be good design Benefits Highlighted buttons present a clear call to action or default action for users. For example, it can be frustrating to users to pop up a dialog box and not have a primary button, because the user has no indication for the preferred flow. Similarly, if a user fills out a long form and then is presented with 3 ...


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It's possible that there is a culturally specific answer to this but, as far as I know, there aren't any colors that have universally significant connotations. Even within cultures one should take these findings with a grain of salt. White may mean purity in one culture and death in another. Someone to whom white is the color of death isn't going to be ...


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Yes there is quite a lot of research on mood, perception, and bias related to color. The terms you are looking for are color theory and color psychology. Doing a search on these terms will yield the body of research. The research paper Effects of Color on Emotions should provide a decent overview as well as a good set of references if you need to dig ...



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