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Interactivity should be indicated by drawing on the user's experience of how real world objects behave. If you have everything grey except for buttons which are, say, green, how does the user know that a green flat rectangle is a button, but a grey flat rectangle isn’t? If the button “pops out” in some way reminiscent of a real world button, then the user ...


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Interactive elements should have affordance. Meaning, they should look like interactive elements. They should look like something you can push/click/tap. Color isn't the only factor when it comes to affordance. Borders, gradients, location, focus, whitespace and copy are all factor for affordance. Making everything gray except for your interactive elements ...


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Definitely avoid pairing red and green together on your website. It'll give low contrast between the two colors because color blind users will see them both as yellow. Why You Should Never Pair Green and Red Together on the Web


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...to see if it is useful for our company to put some extra attention into our designs for those who are colourblind. It's not just colour-blind users who can't see certain colour combinations - actual blind people can't either, so you need to ensure data isn't represented purely visually. Webaim have some useful info on this topic that covers off the ...


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We've done copius amounts of testing across various sites and markets and in all cases red buttons out perform other colours. My thinking is that, although we are inherently programed to react to red, our reactions work to draw our attention. The conversion is then far easier to achieve.


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Colour psychology and marketing is a specialist subject. If your designer has a good understanding of this subject, challenging them over the colour they've chosen is probably not the smartest approach. However, I'm not certain they have, given the context. The choice is certainly not the one I'd make in this situation. In European & North American ...


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It's not, unless red is already used as a confirmation/submit action consistently throughout your site and in this workflow. Google, to talk about the example Henrik Ekblom uses, has red like this because it's used consistently throughout the UI. It's a part of their overall user interface patterns on products like Gmail. This is a case where red would be ...


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First of all, that 'article' that you were sent supporting the notion that red is good is ridiculous. It is not even an article, it is some lady opining about her child's behavior. It's stupid and doesn't mean anything. Moreover, the invocation of evolutionary biology is silly and incoherent. Who's blood are we seeing here? Maybe red is such a striking ...


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I feel like the issue is not so much "is a red button ok", but that in that image you specifically have a white button, a light blue button, and a bright red button. Red by itself could mean a lot of different things, but the contrast between the two calm looking buttons and the red one seems to imply something special about the red one. A red button is ...


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It depends entirely on the page, site, situation. What works for company A may not work for company B. My suggestion is to use A/B testers, like Google's Experiments https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1745147?hl=en With A/B testing, you can measure your visitors reactions to different versions of your page (you can change elements in the page, ...


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Check out Google Drive - they use red buttons. I don't think that red signals error as long as the theme and GUI parts of the page goes in red (and that is probably why Google uses those colors). If there would have been a red and a green button, then I would have been suspicious about clicking the red, but in this case I don't get that feeling. The ...


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We are testing the exact same thing at the moment (hopefully I'll get back with the result when it'ts done). From our current experience and I've seen this on other sites, people tend do click the red button IF there is no other "actions". You have 3 buttons very close to each other and personally I would not click the red button. If it was Green I ...


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Since you have phrased your question 'Is it acceptable...', the answer is: Yes it is acceptable. A lot of things are sub-optimal and still acceptable. Depends on your standards :) Is it the best possible choice of colors for this particular action? No, very likely not! It does one thing and only one thing very good - stand out, however it also introduces a ...


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On web you need user's focus as much as possible and this can be achieved via images/color and typography etc. Red is associated with eagerness, energy and attention. So when we see red(traffic light, blood, danger signs, waitress with red lipstick , red apple) we stop. And then take an action. So as per your screen you want user to validate before he hit ...


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Color associations are very cultural thing. In computer culture I assume people usually don't think: oh blood, yammi. At least my experience is that red implies mostly one of the following: Attention: whatever it is, it must be important Error: As developers always wanted attention for errors, in the right context red is highly associated with errors. Just ...


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The Guidelines have been specified by the user below. A tool I like using is the Colour Contrast Analyser. A desktop application that allows you to eye drop any color on your screen and outputs the contrast ratio.


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As Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG2.0) claimed level AA requires a contrast ratio of 4.5:1 for normal text and 3:1 for large text. Level AAA requires a contrast ratio of 7:1 for normal text and 4.5:1 for large text. You can use contract color checker at WebAIM


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This is how I would try and do it.. I would also color code the numbers so that if you have a good mark it's green, but if you aren't doing so well then it would be orange like this... You could just do something in your code like if (PERCENTAGE <= 30) { makeColorOrange(); } if (PERCENTAGE > 30 || PERCENTAGE < 50) { makeColorYellow(); } else ...


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HSB, because it adheres better to the 'natural' way people perceive color. RGB is a problem for most people. They don't get how to mix yellow from red and green, for instance. That said, a color circle (H) with two sliders (S and B) may be better. But it takes up more space in the UI. Can you afford that? Another option, which could make a lot of sense, ...


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In my opinion, this is bad user experience. Everytime the product explicitly confuses you or make you not do something that is a legitimate action, it is a bad designed UX. I got frustrated when I first saw this behavior in Youtube. It made me want to further flag the video because I wanted to express how awful the video was and I couldn't find out if my ...


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Considering social patterns, people are much more inclined to up-vote or like things that down-voting or disliking. Which is the opposite of the normal behaviour that we expose on a day to day basis where people complain more than acknowledge good things. In social media, or sites that use social behaviours, the fact that people tend to feel bad about ...


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I personally prefer selecting from a color wheel. One advantage of a color wheel is that you can leave markers from other color choices visible on the wheel itself. That way if I'm trying to come up with a complement, I can quickly look to the opposite side to pick the trim color. Or I can gauge if my three main color choices are about 120 degrees apart. ...


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The colors represent different editors which are labeled to the right of the editing window. Each color label has the username of the editor and my guess is that Google thought users was going to communicate via inline chat. Possibly Google thought that phone conversations between users would use editor name rather than editor color. But since I don't work ...



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