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112

I am thinking of designing a website that will have no color other than black, gray, and white. May I ask what the rationale is behind this decision? The reason I ask is because I don't think a pure B/G/W is suitable for most commercial designs, unless client's branding fits that scheme. So before you decide to go with this route, make sure your ...


62

High contrast such as black on white can cause eye strain. Also there is evidence that it is particularly bad for people with dyslexia. For further info read articles at UX Movement and The Bristol Dyslexia Centre. WCAG provide details on what is acceptable colour contrast, but dont state an upper limit. Personally, I like to use a different algorithm that ...


62

Just a guess: If they used black (minimum intensity for all three color channels) or white (maximum intensity for all color channels) you might think they are off, so instead they use only one of their base color channels (out of Red Green Blue). Red light may remind some people of an alarm and others of a district in Amsterdam. Green may seem like ...


50

Beyond just suggesting places like Adobe Kuler, ColourLovers, Color Scheme Designer, ColorMatch5K ColorJack, and ColorStream (iPhone app), you may benefit from learning about color theory and why and how colors should be combined and chosen. Here are some useful resources: Worqx's Color Tutorials Basic Color Theory Smashing Magazine's 3-part series on ...


46

Darker color scheme are often used effectively in software that focuses heavily on visual content. For example Adobe Lightroom, Adobe After Effects, Microsoft Expression Blend, and Kaxaml are interfaces that have a dark color theme. This allows the interface to fade into the background and let the content come alive Why is it not widely used? I guess it ...


41

Just because your brand color is red doesn't make the use of red for errors obsolete, it's just a matter of extent. Take the Viaplay signup form for example: Viaplay has red as their main accent color, which is used throughout the website for actions buttons, icons, header, graphic elements etc.. however, in the form they do tone down the use. They ...


41

Any sentence or fragment which is styled should apply the same style to its punctuation. In this case, the exclamation mark is part of the sentence being styled, so it should carry the same style as any alphabetic characters or punctuation within the sentence: The brown fox (trailing the chicken's feathers) jumped over the hill! A contrasting situation ...


38

The following screenshot is taken from the speech by Jon Wiley at UXweek 2011 (Original video). He explains the design decisions made by google in the past months. Look towards the end (after minute 27) of the video to see it by yourself: red is for "create something" green is for "share something" blue is for "do something" (e.g. submit a form) Keep ...


37

There has been a lot of research on this topic since the 1980s and a lot of it still holds true today. One study from the 1980s states this: However, most studies have shown that dark characters on a light background are superior to light characters on a dark background (when the refresh rate is fairly high). For example, Bauer and Cavonius (1980) found ...


35

First things first, this is what it looks like to color blind (deuteranopia; by the most common form of colorblindness) users: (also the zebrastripes are almost impossible to see, colorblind or not) Red on green is a classically bad color combo, though your magenta text isn't entirely unreadable. The background color is very loud though which can be hard ...


33

I think the blue goes back to the days of consumer-grade video cassette recorders with on-screen message displays. Superimposing an image on a video signal requires that one know which parts of the signal will be displayed where on the screen. If the video signal includes valid horizontal and vertical sync pulses, one can measure the time since the last ...


33

Rather than the other answers that just express personal opinions let me direct you to this article that in turn cites some actual research which I will quote here as well: However, most studies have shown that dark characters on a light background are superior to light characters on a dark background (when the refresh rate is fairly high). For example, ...


32

Legibility depends on high contrast between foreground and background, so black-and-white is the safest bet. See for example: Hall RH & Hanna H 2003. The Impact of Web Page Text-Background Color Combinations on Readability, Retention, Aesthetics, and Behavioral Intention, Laboratory for Information Technology Evaluation, Technical Report ...


32

Dark on light vs light on dark themes can have multiple affects, such as: Bringing attention to an application vs bringing attention to the application's contents People focus on brighter areas - darker background brings attention to the content, while lighter background bring attention to the window itself vs the desktop. Imagine if the box around ...


30

A good example to consider would be the ibooks app in iOS which allows users to enable the dark theme automatically depending on the light sensor detection. However as PS86 rightly pointed out, dont build this automatically into the system but enable the user to set as a desired parameter. To quote this article, the ibook app enables this by an option ...


29

Issues You are right about the use of color. Users are unlikely to remember what it means if you have 8 states. It also creates problems for color blind users. Using a legend is not great because it forces the eye to dart around the screen. It also doesn't solve the color blind issue. 300 items will be difficult to navigate, so careful cell design ...


28

In and of themselves the colors are fine; I think it's the particular combination of colors that you are using. The red rgb(192, 55, 47) is at 46% luminance, and your eyes will adjust to that accordingly; but the white text is 100% luminance, which requires your eyes to adjust slightly. On bright enough monitors, it can actually be kind of jarring, although ...


26

Since you have phrased your question 'Is it acceptable...', the answer is: Yes it is acceptable. A lot of things are sub-optimal and still acceptable. Depends on your standards :) Is it the best possible choice of colors for this particular action? No, very likely not! It does one thing and only one thing very good - stand out, however it also introduces a ...


25

This disparity is likely due to a variety of factors: It's not clear exactly how many colors humans can see. For example, the table at the top of this page about the number of colors distinguishable by the human eye cites various academic papers as saying anything from "more than 100,000" to "roughly 10 million." In any case, the number of colors visible ...


24

Convention is nice when your color scheme allows it, but internal consistency is more important, so don't feel like you need to stick to the blue/purple/red palette. It's also vital that your links are differentiated from normal text. Differentiation is usually accomplished by color, weight, or an underline. Different colors for different link states ...


24

How about: not making the text flash, but the background. This will improve readability of the text itself. work with an "animation" so that the background does not flip on/off but gradually fades in and out.


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In general, using only color to indicate information is bad for accessibility reasons. Red/green colorblindness is the most common and occurs in 8% of males. Using an icon, like an X or warning sign, is the best way to go. If you must differentiate color for business reasons (i.e. people at the top think it should be a different color), then pick one that ...


22

A standard, such as #0000FF for unvisited links and #800080 for visited links, is only good if nearly everyone does it. Otherwise users cannot anticipate when the standard will and won’t be followed and thus can no longer use it to predict site behavior. Unfortunately most web sites do not follow these color standards. In a haphazard survey (not to be ...


22

Corporate colors are for visual branding NOT UI development. The UI is supposed to assist and get out of the way of the user. That's why most tend to be neutral in their colors (grays, gray blues, etc.)


22

I would say yes. To quote this research article Different colors mean different things to people in different cultures. For example, Ricks et al(1974) give an example of a company with packaging having green label was not well received by some Malay- sians, because to them green symbolized the jungle with its dangers and diseases. However, green ...


22

Grey buttons can still be used, provided you can give enough indication that the button is indeed not disabled. You could have a darker font color, like this: Even then, this approach is not recommended. Seconding Pasha's thoughts, such an attempt to make grey buttons seem "non-disabled" might still not be convincing to all users. Unless you're bent on ...


21

There are no colours that shouldn't be used, but there are combinations that aren't helpful in terms of aesthetic and in ease of perception, or inappropriate use of colour that clashes with culturally accepted symbols. Don't forget to check that the colour blind will not have difficulty with your UI, and that the use of colour to encode information is only ...


21

Research generally suggests light on dark is harder to read in most cases but considering we're talking accessibility, you should know that results for those with normal vision don't necessarily hold true for those with various vision impairments. I've heard higher contrast (the mode in Windows is called High Contrast mode I think) can be easier to read ...


21

You are talking about Stroop Effect. stroop effect by Wikipedia It is more intuitive and easier to remember to show a colour name in the colour itself.


20

I would say it has to do with the following reasons : Contrast : Studies have shown that black or dark backgrounds provide the easiest contrast and can allow users to read discrete information quickly without having to make an effort to discern details when in a dark environment (which is often the environment in cars) Darkness adaptive : Another reason ...



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