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107

I am thinking of designing a website that will have no color other than black, gray, and white. May I ask what the rationale is behind this decision? The reason I ask is because I don't think a pure B/G/W is suitable for most commercial designs, unless client's branding fits that scheme. So before you decide to go with this route, make sure your ...


43

Beyond just suggesting places like Adobe Kuler, ColourLovers, Color Scheme Designer, ColorMatch5K ColorJack, and ColorStream (iPhone app), you may benefit from learning about color theory and why and how colors should be combined and chosen. Here are some useful resources: Worqx's Color Tutorials Basic Color Theory Smashing Magazine's 3-part series on ...


41

Any sentence or fragment which is styled should apply the same style to its punctuation. In this case, the exclamation mark is part of the sentence being styled, so it should carry the same style as any alphabetic characters or punctuation within the sentence: The brown fox (trailing the chicken's feathers) jumped over the hill! A contrasting situation ...


40

Just because your brand color is red doesn't make the use of red for errors obsolete, it's just a matter of extent. Take the Viaplay signup form for example: Viaplay has red as their main accent color, which is used throughout the website for actions buttons, icons, header, graphic elements etc.. however, in the form they do tone down the use. They ...


39

High contrast such as black on white can cause eye strain. Also there is evidence that it is particularly bad for people with dyslexia. For further info read articles at UX Movement and The Bristol Dyslexia Centre. WCAG provide details on what is acceptable colour contrast, but dont state an upper limit. Personally, I like to use a different algorithm that ...


35

First things first, this is what it looks like to color blind (deuteranopia; by the most common form of colorblindness) users: (also the zebrastripes are almost impossible to see, colorblind or not) Red on green is a classically bad color combo, though your magenta text isn't entirely unreadable. The background color is very loud though which can be hard ...


34

The following screenshot is taken from the speech by Jon Wiley at UXweek 2011 (Original video). He explains the design decisions made by google in the past months. Look towards the end (after minute 27) of the video to see it by yourself: red is for "create something" green is for "share something" blue is for "do something" (e.g. submit a form) Keep ...


31

Darker color scheme are often used effectively in software that focuses heavily on visual content. For example Adobe Lightroom, Adobe After Effects, Microsoft Expression Blend, and Kaxaml are are interfaces that have a dark color theme. This allows the interface to fade into the background and let the content come alive Why is it not widely used? I guess it ...


28

In and of themselves the colors are fine; I think it's the particular combination of colors that you are using. The red rgb(192, 55, 47) is at 46% luminance, and your eyes will adjust to that accordingly; but the white text is 100% luminance, which requires your eyes to adjust slightly. On bright enough monitors, it can actually be kind of jarring, although ...


25

Since you have phrased your question 'Is it acceptable...', the answer is: Yes it is acceptable. A lot of things are sub-optimal and still acceptable. Depends on your standards :) Is it the best possible choice of colors for this particular action? No, very likely not! It does one thing and only one thing very good - stand out, however it also introduces a ...


23

Convention is nice when your color scheme allows it, but internal consistency is more important, so don't feel like you need to stick to the blue/purple/red palette. It's also vital that your links are differentiated from normal text. Differentiation is usually accomplished by color, weight, or an underline. Different colors for different link states ...


23

In general, using only color to indicate information is bad for accessibility reasons. Red/green colorblindness is the most common and occurs in 8% of males. Using an icon, like an X or warning sign, is the best way to go. If you must differentiate color for business reasons (i.e. people at the top think it should be a different color), then pick one that ...


21

There are no colours that shouldn't be used, but there are combinations that aren't helpful in terms of aesthetic and in ease of perception, or inappropriate use of colour that clashes with culturally accepted symbols. Don't forget to check that the colour blind will not have difficulty with your UI, and that the use of colour to encode information is only ...


21

Legibility depends on high contrast between foreground and background, so black-and-white is the safest bet. See for example: Hall RH & Hanna H 2003. The Impact of Web Page Text-Background Color Combinations on Readability, Retention, Aesthetics, and Behavioral Intention, Laboratory for Information Technology Evaluation, Technical Report ...


20

A standard, such as #0000FF for unvisited links and #800080 for visited links, is only good if nearly everyone does it. Otherwise users cannot anticipate when the standard will and won’t be followed and thus can no longer use it to predict site behavior. Unfortunately most web sites do not follow these color standards. In a haphazard survey (not to be ...


20

Dark on light vs light on dark themes can have multiple affects, such as: Bringing attention to an application vs bringing attention to the application's contents People focus on brighter areas - darker background brings attention to the content, while lighter background bring attention to the window itself vs the desktop. Imagine if the box around ...


20

This disparity is likely due to a variety of factors: It's not clear exactly how many colors humans can see. For example, the table at the top of this page about the number of colors distinguishable by the human eye cites various academic papers as saying anything from "more than 100,000" to "roughly 10 million." In any case, the number of colors visible ...


20

Grey buttons can still be used, provided you can give enough indication that the button is indeed not disabled. You could have a darker font color, like this: Even then, this approach is not recommended. Seconding Pasha's thoughts, such an attempt to make grey buttons seem "non-disabled" might still not be convincing to all users. Unless you're bent on ...


19

I would say it has to do with the following reasons : Contrast : Studies have shown that black or dark backgrounds provide the easiest contrast and can allow users to read discrete information quickly without having to make an effort to discern details when in a dark environment (which is often the environment in cars) Darkness adaptive : Another reason ...


17

It sounds like an out-of-date concept. I think there were problems when the colours could not be rendered, because they were sometimes shown as speckled - a combination of colours, that appear correct in large swathes, but would not work at all for narrower items like borders. Unless you are explicitly designing for very old computers, then I would not ...


17

It really depends on the nature of the equipment and the seriousness of the alert. Does a high temperature mean that over ten years, this particular piece of equipment will fail to weigh out precisely 1.2 kilograms of potatoes, and instead perhaps will weigh out 1.21 kilograms of potatoes? In that case, I would say blinking red text is perhaps overkill. ...


16

On ColorMatters.com there is a question about Colors for Food Products: Logos and Packaging One paragraph quoted below: ..blue is an appetite suppressant, although only in certain concentrations and by volume of use. But a color like Purple Martin used in a ratio of say 15-20% of total space with a dominant color such as Golden Wheat, add maybe a ...


16

I think red is pretty much the convention in this context so you should use red for errors that need to be fixed before you can move on/send the form. Yellow is in general for warnings (eg. user perhaps should/could improve something, but it does not stop from proceeding). Yellow can be used with for example with one of those password strength thingies where ...


16

Check out Google Drive - they use red buttons. I don't think that red signals error as long as the theme and GUI parts of the page goes in red (and that is probably why Google uses those colors). If there would have been a red and a green button, then I would have been suspicious about clicking the red, but in this case I don't get that feeling. The ...


15

Blue is the most common Favorite Color, which has been backed up repeatedly. (source) In addition to being the most popular color, blue just works well. Backgrounds are often white or black, and blue works on both. Blue is a friendly color for most common forms of colorblindness as well, as it doesn't mix in with any other colors in red/green ...


15

Instead of using colors, draw visual emphasis through other means, such as using danger icons, font weight, and/or jagged outlines. Here's a an example, excessively using all three of these cues: EDIT: The comments below suggest that I didn't make it clear enough in my original post that using all three of these cues together would be excessive. (I'd ...


15

If you want to get featured in the iOS app store, it's best to comply with apple marketing guidelines which require you to use the newest black version of their 'available in the app store' icon that has the apple instead of the phone. They don't usually promote apps that have marketing collateral that goes against their guidance. Google has similar details ...


14

There are no rules, at least no hard and fast ones. Following research to the letter can result in making an ugly site--blue links work best, but blue links on a red background are hard to read! The research however can guide you to the "best practices" and your maintain your sense of good aesthetics so you know when to break from convention. While there ...


14

Reds, yellows and oranges are spotted swifter by the human eye, and multivariant testing typically confirms that call-to-action buttons get the most clicks when they're orange - and by a significant margin. Reds and yellow both do well; greens often come out poorest. Yellow possibly fares a little worse on the web because humans have a harder time resolving ...


14

Research generally suggests light on dark is harder to read in most cases but considering we're talking accessibility, you should know that results for those with normal vision don't necessarily hold true for those with various vision impairments. I've heard higher contrast (the mode in Windows is called High Contrast mode I think) can be easier to read ...



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